bone head split so far, somebody save the day. - Page 25
Page 25 of 28 FirstFirst ... 152324252627 ... LastLast
Results 481 to 500 of 550
  1. #481
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Il, USA
    Posts
    630

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    novice
    If I would have set the supers on their side and left both ends open and even out in the weather, I probably would not have had issues except for maybe wood rot. I keep all my unused hive outside now and so don't worry too mush about rot (might come back and bite me later though).
    gww
    I stack them all in the garage. I hate the thought of my home-made boxes getting rot, so pretty much everything gets a coat of paint every year. I value the wood itself, since most of it came out of my dad's barn. I helped him build the livestock pens when I was a kid, and now am reusing the same wood for my bees 50 years later. Some of the wood was from his uncle, so maybe 80 years old.

    I buy the returned paint at Farm & Fleet or Ace for <$10/gallon. Sometimes odd colors. Last year line marker paint, for painting stripes on parking lots was really cheap. So I have some very vivid yellow, red and blue boxes now. Interested to see how well it holds up in the weather.

    Boxes full of comb go outside when the temps are below freezing, which seems to kill moths.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #482
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    3,883

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by AR1 View Post

    I buy the returned paint at Farm & Fleet or Ace for <$10/gallon. Sometimes odd colors. Last year line marker paint, for painting stripes on parking lots was really cheap. So I have some very vivid yellow, red and blue boxes now. Interested to see how well it holds up in the weather.

    Boxes full of comb go outside when the temps are below freezing, which seems to kill moths.
    Being a cheap-skate, I pickup free paint only (craigslist, etc) - whatever it is - goes.

    Moths - this is how the mid/late fall dead outs are the best - you clean the bees out, then have the entire winter to use the hive as in-place storage (no moths).
    Until then, I use the live hives as storage units - bees take care of it all.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #483
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    This is how I store my hives. It seems like no matter how much space I get for storage, it never stays empty enough to use. I built a 50 by 20 pole barn two or so years ago and though I have some hive stuff in there, no real room left.

    Cheers
    gww
    Attached Images Attached Images
    zone 5b

  5. #484
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kirksville, Missouri USA
    Posts
    1,770

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    gww, I can relate to you needing to see for yourself about the moths. I tend to just think something won't happen in my case, until it happens. Robbing was my biggest eye opener early on.

    This fall as it cooled down, empty supers that had to come off, I left them outside on end and they did fairly well. It was when nights were getting pretty cool in October. If I put them in the storage shed they would have been pummeled like yours was. How do I know that? The ones in the storage shed were getting moths. I consider moving all comb outside when it gets frigid for a few days in case something is wintering over in the stored combs.

    A Novice, that's an interesting result using the light on with comb. I would like to know if anyone else had such a result.

  6. #485
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Danial
    It was great to hear from you. Hope all is well. I could not have made it this far with out you.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  7. #486
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kirksville, Missouri USA
    Posts
    1,770

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Gww, everything is good. I have been quite busy for a few months, but have an easy day today, which means not such a rush. I haven't been on here for some time though. Good honey harvest per hive, but queen mating has not gone too well.

    Encouragement goes both ways here. Good to hear you are still buzzing there.

  8. #487
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Smile Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    It is 59 degrees today and the bees are mobbing the maples in my yard. They are bringing off white or yellow looking pollen in and I assume some nectar.

    I have one hive that is only two mediums high and is the one I fed last year. It is the only hive I have an entrance reducer on and has had bees covering the entrance in some pretty cold weather.

    So, I took the three mediums that I let the wax moth destroy the comb in and combined all the comb left in it into one medium. There were a few full combs but mostly just partials with holes or the bottom parts eaten off. It is some pretty raggedy comb with some webbing and cocoons here and there. I put this on top of the above mentioned hive. It is probably still to cold for this but time will tell.

    The hive looks really good at the entrance but not as good from the top of the top box. I looked down and did not see any real stores in it and so it is a good thing for the maples. I did not pull frames to see for sure but am pretty confident they are pretty empty.


    This probably means the rest of my hives are on edge of starvation as well. However, they are still all alive and I am going to let it ride and see where it takes me. I am not going to pray for snow though.
    Cheers
    gww
    Attached Images Attached Images
    zone 5b

  9. #488
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kirksville, Missouri USA
    Posts
    1,770

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Hi gww, it is good to hear the maple bloom is getting close to me up here. I was expecting by next weekend first pollen with the predicted weather. I am watching the maples closer this year since tapping sap for maple syrup on my one tree in the yard. No bud break yet but the sap has slowed considerably today.

    If the weather has enough warm days to fly the maples should keep your bees going, but if it goes cold for a week, that would be a concern if they are going dry. March is considered the biggest risk of loss I think. they are brooding up and almost out of food.

    One year in mid May we had a cold wet week so I checked on some and found several to be bone dry and pulling open brood. An emergency feed on the ones needed saved the day and warmer weather happened a couple days later. I would suggest checking for actual stores if I were you, and add for a little surplus. March is a risky month for bees if they don't have a good storage anymore. If there's some flying weather most days I wouldn't be concerned as much.

    I have concluded a hive with an extra super of honey at this time will be a lot stronger in May than one without. They have more food to expand faster. My big busting hives always has had extra stores coming into spring. I have early on wondered if I needed to extract the extra for room, but they manage to consume most of it by May.

  10. #489
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Danial
    I am still reeling from my first year when we had that strong early warm spell while the hives had stores and everything decided to swarm. Don't get me wrong, it was a blessing and why I have nine hives now. However, I have decided to gamble knowing it slows them down tremendously, cause I like my hive numbers more then I like as much honey and splits as I can make.

    I could do as you say and make sure and may regret it when I don't but probably won't do it till it is 70 degrees for a day or two. I do believe we are going to get week long cold spells yet but also see that the forecast is min flying temps for the next week if it does not change. I am going to hope that the bees have it figured out and don't over brood for their resources. If I make a mistake, I will try and not repeat it next year but am just seeing how it works this year.

    I realize that I am not taking advantage of what could be possible with the bees and the brood they could raise with more resources. In Doolittles book written in the turn of the century, he called it giving the bees "millions of honey" and thought it was necessary for massive production. I, on the other hand have the goal of slowing the bees down so that swarm worries come with much warmer weather then is possible with super strong hives. I don't really want to kill them though but do want to see if that is where it goes. Hope not and I may still get scared.

    Just cause I may be crazy and not always listen to good advice, I hope you keep giving it cause you have saved me with your thinking a few times already.

    My goals are to sorta see what is possible with little resources and effort. I get into the hives sometimes even when not needed just to look but also am trying to do very little while there so I can learn when to do stuff and when not to for my kind of bee keeping which is to never spend money or buy things I can build myself. I am still playing at danial boone where I get by without stores. I did buy bee repellent for harvest though. That and a turkey feather as a bee brush.

    I am a terrible sales man and still have a couple of gal of honey from last year and probably a gal from the year before and I only made ten gal each year and so making honey is only so nice. I only keep the number of hives I got for disaster, so if several die, I will still not have to buy bees. Stupid way to keep bees but they are much better to me then my chickens are. I have came out ahead every year from year one and so that was the goal and I am meeting it. Granted, only a couple of hundred ahead and being very good to my kids ahead. I like it though and would do no work with out it and so it is probably good for my health also.

    All my maples are in various stages of death now. I don't know if they are silver or red but do not think they are sugar maples. I have always thought about getting the sap but it is one thing I never got to and don't think my trees are suited for. I am curious about you doing it though. I would love your thoughts on it and if you like doing it or not.

    I did grow mushrooms last winter but am out of that now.

    It is great to hear from you and I hope your bees are well.
    Thanks
    gww
    zone 5b

  11. #490
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    I am going to hope that the bees have it figured out and don't over brood for their resources.
    GWW:

    I always enjoy reading your updates, and I am glad that your experiment in minimalist Fall feeding appears to be working.

    More generally, I agree philosophically with your goal of wanting bees that are equipped to 'read' the environmental cues and plan appropriately (most years) in my specific locale.

    It sounds optimistic that you've got stock that mirrors your goals, so I expect that is 90% of the keys to success.

    Good luck to you in this coming year- and congratulations on yet another highly successful overwintering.

    I'll look forward to your continued updates.

    Russ
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  12. #491
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Russ
    I like to know what might be possible in handling bees even if I take a different rout. Who knows what the future will bring. I have little ambition but might have more in future years if I figure other things out in my supply change. If I had an avenue of cheap, accessible equipment, I might try and raise some bees to sell. I can not do that building my own and don't want money more then I want lazy.

    Getting to yours and my situation of trying to raise bees with out treatments, I do wonder if my holding the bees back from their possible potential, might not be a benefit towards survival (as long as big mistakes are not made walking the edge). Since mites reproduce in brood and eat fat bodies, maybe having depressed bees fits the time line to not let mites get out of hand. I don't know this but it does play on my mind and in my thinking toward actions I take.

    Of course if you starve a hive to death, you don't need mites to kill them.

    I go more by feeling then by knowledge cause I have no comparisons to my own experiences. I am trying to pay attention and reading others actions for potential but do what I do.

    It is nice to know there are many ways to skin a cat but you can only try so much stuff cause it takes real time to try it.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  13. #492
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kirksville, Missouri USA
    Posts
    1,770

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    gww, I understand your desire not to split or have piles of honey. I remember going from 9 gallons one year to 95 gallons. It was fun to pile up all that honey in 5 gallon buckets, but took a while to figure out how to sell it. That's been 3 years ago, and I finally have caught up and only have enough left for some regular customers and us till July. I was mainly thinking to verify and know what the bees have in stock if some long cold or wet weather comes along. I just like to know what hives have plenty and which ones are barely ahead on stores. Again, I don't feed unless it's critical, but it takes some looking to know that. Most of my feeding is bricks in winter for just in case.

    I do get it about your not spending money and experimenting to see what happens with no intervention. It sounds like you are on track then.

    Regarding tapping the maples, I just made up some tapered tubes with what I had and attached some tubing to them into some buckets with a lid held on with bricks. There's a lot of advice online about weather and timing, which I am just figuring out. A friend got me started last year and we only have one bigger maple, but we got about 9 gallons out of it this year, which boils down to a quart or better. It's dandy tasting stuff though.

    A silver maple has silvery undersides on the leaves and they are messy trees dropping twigs and branches a lot. Sap boils down at different rates for different tree species, but average is 40 to 1. you can use any maple, and other species.

  14. #493
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    Getting to yours and my situation of trying to raise bees with out treatments, I do wonder if my holding the bees back from their possible potential, might not be a benefit towards survival (as long as big mistakes are not made walking the edge). Since mites reproduce in brood and eat fat bodies, maybe having depressed bees fits the time line to not let mites get out of hand. I don't know this but it does play on my mind and in my thinking toward actions I take.
    GWW:

    Good insight- from my very humble vantage point, I see a lot of wisdom in this approach. The only thing I would tweak regarding your thoughts personally would be the idea of 'depressed' bees. Ultimately, my sincerest hope is to have healthy bees who are able to respond appropriately (i.e. brood rearing timing and intensity) to their external cues. I do believe that when we 'bend' the curve to help them, we may at times unwittingly harm them by inducing heavy brood rearing too early which not only means more mouths to feed (and to your point) more opportunities for mite reproduction, which only leads to compounding interest as our relatively long season wears on.

    All that said, I think you are wise to only tinker on the edges of what you have been doing. It has been working for you, so if it ain't broke, don't fix it, right?
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  15. #494
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Russ
    The only thing I would tweak regarding your thoughts personally would be the idea of 'depressed' bees. Ultimately, my sincerest hope is to have healthy bees who are able to respond appropriately (i.e. brood rearing timing and intensity) to their external cues.
    The thing is, it takes a whole year or two to see what is happening when you do something with bees. I can have many ideals but time is what proves stuff. I agree with you though.

    Danial
    Last year is the first year I did not have at least some sugar blocks on some hives. I keep heading to a lower standard towards failure. I hope I am smart enough to recognize when I have stepped over the line but am not sure I am. Time will tell.

    On the maples. I may try that at some point. I also heard that sycamore taste like butter scotch. It does seem like a lot of fire for what you get in the end but I have thought about trying both. My original thought was that I had chickens and so was using the extra eggs for waffles which I was eating every morning. I thought if I got bees, I could eat honey. In the end, I learned I liked syrup better then honey on my waffles. It worked out cause the few bottles of honey I could sell bought lots more syrup then honey. I buy the cheap fake stuff and so I may need to get off my butt and try and make some real stuff.

    I hope to hear about your bee keeping a little this spring and summer and maybe hear how you do on this years harvest. I have always enjoyed knowing and comparing my little operation to yours. See if you have another 200 lbs hive this year. My biggest so far from one hive has been about 50lbs.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  16. #495
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    The thing is, it takes a whole year or two to see what is happening when you do something with bees. I can have many ideals but time is what proves stuff.
    No argument here- now that you have 5 years under your belt I'd humbly suggest that you have a good baseline to work from to see what impact small 'tweaks' you make has on your overall success.

    I'll look forward to reading how Spring unfolds for you- if I were a betting man, I would put my money on it working out .
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  17. #496
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Ok. I lost one more hive and am down to eight hives. If I count the one that died or I killed last oct, that is 20 percent loss this year.

    All I saw in the dead hive was a few capped drone and quite a bit of honey. Maybe a little over half of a medium give or take. I had seen bees taking pollen into this hive but knew the traffic was down at the entrance on my two end hives. One good thing about the way this hive died is that the comb has not been ate up yet by wax moth. Maybe just enough bees in it to protect the comb?

    I miss-judged the other hives. I put my four supers on them and pulled a few half brood combs and put in empties on the others. I thought I might be a little early and that the hives might be low on stores. They surprised me and may be ready to swarm soon. I don't judge this from bee density but more from stores and how much room they have.

    Here is one example. These pictures are from the second box of a three box hive.


    That is quite a honey dome and it means most brood is contained in one medium.

    So for my adding my four supers from last year, I put two under the full boxes of honey and two on top if there was any brood (even half combs) that did not have a honey band on top of the comb.

    The rest, If they had brood in the top box (even if only a few half combs worth), I pulled a comb or two each and put in the empty boxes and put empty frames in their place in with the brood. I did not look for queen cells or dig lower then needed to accomplish just adding space and have no ideal about the hives other then stores on top. It might not be enough and it might be too late but I am out of shape and that was all the energy I could come up with on my first venture into the hives. I am a fair weather bee keeper and today was a really fair weather day where everything was right.

    We are just now getting out first few dandelions and I should be on time but the bees must have did better on the trees then normal or I am a slob and they started with more stores then I thought they had.

    I did not see a bunch of drone brood in what I pulled but did not really look very deep.

    Now I need to decide if I want the honey in the dead hive or want to shake and use as supers or want to use it in splits. Maybe I will catch a swarm. Maybe from my own hives.

    I do seem to be getting lazier as the more years I get in and so I don't even know myself what I am going to do.

    I had all the hives open and did pull some frames and no stings and so the bees are happy right now.

    Well, this is my little update.
    Cheers
    gww

    Ps The guy I sold a few bees to last july said all his bees made it through winter.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by gww; 03-30-2020 at 02:06 PM.
    zone 5b

  18. #497
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    So for my adding my four supers from last year, I put two under the full boxes of honey and two on top if there was any brood (even half combs) that did not have a honey band on top of the comb.

    The rest, If they had brood in the top box (even if only a few half combs worth), I pulled a comb or two each and put in the empty boxes and put empty frames in their place in with the brood.
    GWW:

    Good update- sorry to hear you had a late colony failure.

    I read through your update a few times and was curious (if you don't mind):

    1. So all your colonies were found brooding in the bottom box of the stack?

    2. Assuming (1) is correct, you found the core of the broodnest in the bottom box, most colonies had brood starting in the second box, and a few had brood in the third box?

    3. Assuming (2) is correct, you added four (4) boxes to all colonies generally as follows:

    Those colonies with no brood in third box- two supers between boxes 2 and 3 and two supers on top of former box 3?

    Those colonies with brood in third box- two supers between boxes 2 and 3 and two supers on top of former box three with some brood pyramided up?

    Best of luck to you this Spring.

    Russ
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  19. #498
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    russ
    I do not communicate clearly. I only had 4 supers in total. So, One each hive till I ran out with some going under the third box and some on top based on what was in the top brood box. Some were pure honey and so to add space on top of brood, it took under supering. Any that I found with brood in the top box, if the brood did not have a big band of honey at the top of the comb, I just put the super on top of the hives. When I ran out of supers and only had empty boxes, I baited those boxes which also opened the brood nest a little. I found no full combs of brood in the top boxes but did find comb with brood. I did not dig any deeper then to be able to add space. I still had to pull quite a few frames as any brood I did find was center of the boxes.

    Most of my brood nest are not in the third box and I only got to the second box if the third box was full of honey and no brood. I did not really get down into the nest and for all I know the bottom might be empty but I don't think so.

    I was in that place that I was scared of letting the bees start making plans to swarm and not knowing if they had even got into spring build up hard. There were nice enough days to get in the hive earlier but it was a swamp here. We got wind yesterday and so today I did not sink to my ankles when walking to the hives and so I got in them today but only to buy myself some time, just in case.

    I was going to add space if they needed it or not but all the capped honey in the hives kinda scared me that I might be pushing it and the bees might not have room.

    Bee keeping for me is like mushroom hunting. I usually have to see a couple to really start seeing. I always feel lost. I will look closer when I don't have to mess with all the hives and can pick just a few to look deeper. I have seen hives boiling with bees harder then I saw today but I am not used to seeing all that honey on top and so it was harder to tell and I did not concentrate on brood nest.

    I sometimes forget things I do see and that is why I type it down. This was my first time in this year.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  20. #499
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,913

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    Bee keeping for me is like mushroom hunting. I usually have to see a couple to really start seeing. I always feel lost.
    Thanks for the clarification, GWW. That makes a lot more sense- I suppose I was WAY over-complicating it.

    My how do I identify with always feeling a bit bewildered when doing hive inspections. It has helped me to:

    1. Think twice before opening them up- have I really thought through what the consequences of my inspection might be?

    2. Having a clear purpose in mind before I go in- why am I doing this right now?

    3. Considering 'what if I find...' what am I going to do? Usually nothing, but I want to be prepared to take decisive action if necessary.

    Even then I seem to always have more questions than answers- this seems to me to be one of the charms of beekeeping, however- always something new to learn.
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  21. #500
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,233

    Default Re: bone head split so far, somebody save the day.

    There is still a little pollen being carried into the below mentioned dead hive. I am assuming the hive is got a small amount of laying worker or something. I did not go through the hive and look at every frame. I did see in the second box a few capped drone brood and saw that there did not seem to be signs of a cluster of any sort that looked like it might be covering brood when looking down at the top of the frames. Very slow traffic but for sure pollen loads coming in.

    It just goes to show that pollen loads coming into a hive is not sure sign of life.

    I just found it interesting. I am going to have to break it down further and just see what is there. If I could make 15 more days and not have wax moth issues, I could be in good split territory or I could just shake the frames and use as supers for what I have. Decisions decisions.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

Page 25 of 28 FirstFirst ... 152324252627 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •