Farmers market single frame observation hive question - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Isle of Wight, VA
    Posts
    2,762

    Default Re: Farmers market single frame observation hive question

    single frame observation hives are tough on brood. I will try and get mostly capped brood with emerging bees so the kids can watch a bee crawl out of the cell. If there are a few cells of open brood or eggs, that is nice to have that to show all stages, but I will frequently see the worker bees dragging those out of the cells before the end of the 2 days at the county fair. They just can't regulate the temperature and humidity well enough in an observation hive to keep them growing. But remember, the 10 or so larvae that you will lose are far outweighed by the educational value of what the kids take away from observing the bees up close. Just don't pick a frame of all open brood.

    I have taken an observation hive when it was about 45 degrees out and attached a heating pad to the back of the hive. Had a temperature probe in there to watch how warm it kept it, and it was a balmy 80 (still not warm enough for raising brood but kept the ladies moving around)

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lee\'s Summit, MO
    Posts
    2,514

    Default Re: Farmers market single frame observation hive question

    Quote Originally Posted by lemmje View Post
    I'm not advertising, but this is what I use. Pull the frame with the queen up and close the shutters. The nuc has a frame feeder, and the top has a queen excluder keeping her up there in the glass. Pretty slick. Not cheap, but i really like it.

    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com...ductinfo/U501/
    I don't know how to do a thumbs up emoji but lemmje get one here. I use one of these for when I'm presenting at schools or garden clubs. The hive stays relatively calm being corked up but because they can smell their queen and they've got syrup to work it's much less stressful on the nuc. The wide base and the weight of 4 full frames and 1 feeder make it very stable as well. The only additional thing I'd recommend on it though is adding another layer of screen under the bottom. The first one is countersunk and bees can cling to it and get food and fly out at inopportune times. Putting another layer of mesh on the bottom creates a gap that won't allow them to get food or shelter from the bees inside the nuc. If I did farmers markets (especially once or twice a week) I'd bring this one, no questions asked.
    Ninja, is not in the dictionary. Well played Ninja's, well played...

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Woodbridge, VA (But planning to move to NW Louisiana soon)
    Posts
    279

    Default Re: Farmers market single frame observation hive question

    Several years ago, at a Louisiana state fair, we were admiring an observation hive, with the queen, the largest bee of the bunch, marked with a bright pink dot. As we were looking on, an obviously experienced beekeeper walked up, took a quick glance, and said that wasn't the queen, it was a drone! The OH owner immediately said yes, it was too hard on his hive to pull the queen for an extended period.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Moscow, ID
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Farmers market single frame observation hive question

    Thanks Ruth, that's very helpful! I'm down to 2 hives right now and they're still trying to build up, so unless it's a nice mild day I think I will wait until June to use the observation hive. I'm not willing to suffer the losses after the winter we just had, and there will be more opportunities to show off the girls in following months

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