Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up - Page 4
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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
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    6,034

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    What planting zone are you in in Nehawka, Michael?

    I'm 5B/5A border here, similar colony count, and have no problem populating a cell builder, mating nucs, and getting queen rearing rolling grafting the Thursday nearest April 15th.
    When's bee camp? Early April? Maybe you're doing a lot more nucs than I am though. First round is usually 15ish nucs (2x deep frames each usually in 4-way boxes). Then it balloons up after that obviously.

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  3. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    53,768

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    USDA says we are 5b. I think they are mistaken based on the bitter cold we usually get. I try to buy fruit trees that are zone 4 if I can. I settle for zone 5 if I can't. I might experiment with a few zone 6 ones now that some of the USDA maps say we are officially zone 6... but the one I just looked up still says 5b, or they changed it back due to this winter... I was feeling pretty pessimistic about the bees this year due to colder and longer than normal colder temperatures, but it was 65 F day before yesterday and there were bees everywhere. Some of the hives they are going in and out of are probably dead outs getting robbed out, but there were bees coming and going from all the boxes.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
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    4,012

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    I am supposedly 5b and we have some pollen now. I could never tell what was activity and what was robbing. I know I can not see them going directly fly from one to the other. The activity peaks from each hive do not come at exactly at the same time of day. I only have eight hives and at least saw a bee at each hive bringing in pollen. That may not prove that the hive is not being robbed but was my best gauge of robbing but hoped it showed that some of the old hive is still alive inside.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  5. #64
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
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    3,061

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    Gm



    I got this quote from here.
    http://articles.extension.org/pages/...uctive-biology

    I did see that the mite can start up to 7 (baby mites) but that they are not viable because of the time of uncapping and so the real rate in worker brood is about 1.6 and in drone brood due to longer being capped it is like 2.4 or so that actually live.
    Cheers
    gww
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...tb00261.x/full


    Seems there is a bit conflicting data (surprise surprise) but both papers agree the
    number of FERTILE mites increases. the actual ratio of fertile mites in worker is closer to 1.1

    Charles
    500-1000 hives mostly honey

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
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    1,448

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by msl View Post
    The US numbers come from here
    https://bip2.beeinformed.org/survey/

    the french number was off.. I flipped the seasonal loss with the winter loss number by mistake
    https://ec.europa.eu/food/animals/li...n_mortality_en


    as you can see the state of losses is very different else were then it is in the US
    Interesting map - losses fairly obviously related to geographical location - suggesting that temperature and/or starvation are responsible (rather than mites/TF etc). Use VOA, deal with temperature and feed, and winter losses drop dramatically. My losses have been zero for the last 6 or 7 years - although I may have lost one or two this winter, due to the 'weather bomb' we're just about to emerge from - will know in a day or two.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  7. #66

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    I read in our bee magazine that losses were 30% in germany last winter. Treated hives.

    The spring is getting more and more to be later in year which is very dangerous to the colonies in respect to starving or freezing if they are weakened by mites. A sign of climate change and a more virulent virus perhaps.

    This leads to more importing of bee packages early in year and therefore to introduce more disease like the SHB which is not present for now.

    Itīs not a spacing of 100 m only which prevents mite infestation, itīs the preventing of drift via robber screens or other managements IMHO.

  8. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
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    4,012

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Charles
    Seems there is a bit conflicting data (surprise surprise) but both papers agree the
    number of FERTILE mites increases. the actual ratio of fertile mites in worker is closer to 1.1
    1.1 is better then 1.6.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,768

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    >I am supposedly 5b and we have some pollen now.

    You are ahead of us. We have nothing yet.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  10. #69
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,448

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by SiWolKe View Post
    Itīs not a spacing of 100 m only which prevents mite infestation, itīs the preventing of drift via robber screens or other managements IMHO.
    I'd agree with that. Right now 90% of my hives have anti-robbing screens - soon to be 100%, even the big ones.

    FWIW - winter losses still at zero %, although I do have had one colony on 'life-support' (dummied-down, extra stores and temperature maintained at 20-25C) since January. Should be ok after I donate some capped brood ...
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Penobscot County, ME, USA
    Posts
    1,206

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by SiWolKe View Post
    I read in our bee magazine that losses were 30% in germany last winter. Treated hives.

    The spring is getting more and more to be later in year which is very dangerous to the colonies in respect to starving or freezing if they are weakened by mites. A sign of climate change...
    So, you are saying that it is getting colder and Winters are getting longer?
    If you want to be successful, study successful people and do what they do.
    Zone 4a/b

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,549

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Well it is certainly getting colder and longer here.
    Proverbs 16:24

  13. #72

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by BadBeeKeeper View Post
    So, you are saying that it is getting colder and Winters are getting longer?
    No, warmer, which is even more dangerous. Burning stores, no brood brakes, wet hives....winter is in jan-feb, not around solstice anymore. And maybe longer, october to march. And more rain, less sunny days.
    I believe this works against the bees instincts and they have to adapt.

    Now suddenly itīs 18°C and "shock flow" this could mean itīs blooming much earlier and the flowers will freeze. Our last nightly frost is mid may often.

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