Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up
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  1. #1
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    Default Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Free download (use link): http://link.springer.com/article/10....592-016-0443-9

    Distance between honey bee Apis mellifera colonies regulates populations of Varroa destructor at a landscape scale
    Maxcy P. NOLAN IV, Keith S. DELAPLANE
    Apidologie (2017) 48:8–16
    DOI: 10.1007/s13592-016-0443-9

    Inter-colony distance of Apis mellifera significantly affects colony numbers of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. We set up 15 apiaries, each consisting of two colonies. Each apiary pair was assigned an inter-colony distance of 0, 10, or 100 m. Colonies were rendered nearly mite-free, then one colony in each pair was seeded with 300 female mites (mite-donor colony), while the other remained uninoculated (mite-recipient colony). After 4 months of monitoring, a whole-model analysis showed that apiaries in which colonies were spaced 100 m apart contained lower average mite numbers than 0 or 10 m apiaries. There were interactions among colony type, distance, and sampling date; however, when there were significant differences, mite numbers were always lower in 100 m apiaries than 10 m apiaries. These findings pose the possibility that Varroa populations are resource regulated at a landscape scale: near-neighbor colonies constitute reproductive resource for mites in the form of additional bee brood.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    What would be interesting is a longer term study looking at spatial arrangements. In year 2 would mites once established, devastate the colonies anyway?

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    There is definately some BIAS within this work!

    Basically it is stating that somehow mites are disappearing into the landscape when hives spaced further apart whereas they are magically stepping directly into the neighbor-hive when placed within close distance.

    Anybody believing this?

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Says the mite counts were always lower in the hives spaced 100 m apart. How much lower? Only conclusion I came up.with is this. If you are going to place a couple hives with low mite counts in a new yard , and you are going to put 300 mites in one of the hives, then place them 100 m apart.

  6. #5

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Prof. Tom Seeley found the same in his experiments.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVj4A6F1D_s

  7. #6

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    For many many years the beekeepers in europe prevented drifting by marking the entrances with colors or pictures.

    They considered the food supply and kept only low numbers of hives in one location. Food supply was much better then, since today only agriculture provides much food supply.
    Old bee homes have 5 -10 entrances. There was no migrating.

    Multiplying was done by swarming, no brood combs were shifted. There was no comb hygiene, honey was taken out of brood combs too. Not much pesticides no miticides.
    Honey harvest was one third of today. Propolis was accepted.

    Magazine beekeeping and agricultural managements changed all that.
    Who knows the impact varroa would have had if those methods never changed?

    There are may paths now to go back to a more natural beekeeping.
    But as long as those bees are treated, nobody knows how tolerant they really are. Even in most scientific tf breeding programs the bees are still treated.

    Bienenhaus 2.jpg
    This bee home was built 1933, because itīs not possible to treat the keeper uses the boxes in background.

    Bienenhaus 1.jpg
    This I saw in switzerland, itīs used for swarms by a swarm catcher. The boxes inside are "Hinterbehandlungsbeuten". Natural comb.
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinterbehandlungsbeute

    He shifts the colonies to his tf production bee yard if they survive one winter.
    The swarms he catches are escaped domesticated treated bees, sometimes with marked queen.
    Last edited by 1102009; 02-07-2017 at 01:41 AM.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by SiWolKe View Post
    Even in most scientific tf breeding programs the bees are still treated.
    Because, if you don't treat at all you will end up beeless. That we can see from all TF-keepers. All of the ones promoting TF beekeeping for the last decade has more or less losed all of their hives and yet have not find any stability. Varroa is even a bigger problem now than ten years ago. Even minimal Varroa population can be deadly nowadays, because of the virus infections are more serious it looks...

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Erik Österlund has some interesting thoughts...
    http://elgon.es/resistancebreeding.html

  10. #9

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunajavelho View Post
    Because, if you don't treat at all you will end up beeless. That we can see from all TF-keepers. All of the ones promoting TF beekeeping for the last decade has more or less losed all of their hives and yet have not find any stability. Varroa is even a bigger problem now than ten years ago. Even minimal Varroa population can be deadly nowadays, because of the virus infections are more serious it looks...
    Seems to me you do not know many tf beekeepers.
    There are high losses but there are some, even in europe, who do it for years now and still have survivors, but they do not post in forums.

    And what about Juhani Lunden or some? They have setbacks, like everyone, but still breed better bees and go on with the survivors.

    Iīm in contact with Erik. He uses thymol as treatment for the not susceptible hives. He does not breed queens from those.
    But he realized that he has not enough progress doing this so now he has a bee yard to do the hard bond.

    Erik:
    Your strategy
    Now what should YOU do?
    I say like John Kefuss on the conference in Sweden some years ago. Even if you don't know what to do, do anyway at least something you think is in the direction of becoming a treatment free beekeeper. There are enough of us around giving you ideas. And your are not without brain!
    Maybe you are right to say we will end up bee less, maybe the world will end up beeless.
    So what?
    Is that a reason not to try?

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Juhani is probably is one of the few we can actually trust telling the truth - he down to 12hives last spring, lets hope for a better report next year!

    As for others...., I don't know but losses are huge for M. Bush and S. Parker.
    Hobby beekeepers mostly tell the good stories and disappear when things go down.

    Erik's approach has been different. His Elgon bees are doing well in Varroa-counts in treated hives around Europe, probably due to Monticola.

    I have myself done TF-tests, but I do not see any hope in the tunnel... VSH is good, but just another aid, I do think we need to treat in all future with somekind. I myself treat only once a year with oxalic acid or thymol.

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    >Because, if you don't treat at all you will end up beeless. That we can see from all TF-keepers. All of the ones promoting TF beekeeping for the last decade has more or less losed all of their hives and yet have not find any stability

    I'm not beeless. Last time I was beeless was 2001.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Doesn't this contradict the, My Treatment Free Neighbor Mite Bomb, theory?
    It is a tall, right handed, world! I am neither!!!!

  14. #13

    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunajavelho View Post
    Juhani is probably is one of the few we can actually trust telling the truth - he down to 12hives last spring, lets hope for a better report next year!

    As for others...., I don't know but losses are huge for M. Bush and S. Parker.
    Hobby beekeepers mostly tell the good stories and disappear when things go down.

    Erik's approach has been different. His Elgon bees are doing well in Varroa-counts in treated hives around Europe, probably due to Monticola.

    I have myself done TF-tests, but I do not see any hope in the tunnel... VSH is good, but just another aid, I do think we need to treat in all future with somekind. I myself treat only once a year with oxalic acid or thymol.
    You can trust me about telling the truth! I do not fear setbacks and what you say only makes me more stubborn.

    Erik. oh god, treated hives! I pity him. All this work in vain! If I were him I would give those people the queens I took out of selection.
    To me his queens are golden nuggets.

    We, my co- workers and me have Elgon genetics in our yards and we do not treat. So far Eriks queens show very good performance.

    Treating once in the season is treating always. I have no problem with people who treat. I have problems with people who say they want to reduce treatments because they will blame me if their hives die.
    I, who do not treat, know itīs difficult for the bees, so Iīm blaming no one except me for losses.

    In three years I have not seen anyone to have tf bees after doing the soft bond. But I know of some going blended or hard bond and still having bees.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    @ Bernhard
    Since he is a human too even Tom Seeley may be in error - at least from time to time.

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    To me it makes perfect sense that the higher the population density the easier it would be to spread diseases and parasites. Not just in bees but in any organism. I've always assumed that horizontal transmission is one of the great obstacles that commercial operations face when trying to keep their hives healthy.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    To me it makes perfect sense that the higher the population density the easier it would be to spread diseases and parasites. Not just in bees but in any organism. I've always assumed that horizontal transmission is one of the great obstacles that commercial operations face when trying to keep their hives healthy.
    Makes sense to me. Even a cursory study of epidemiology shows that to be the case. Isolated individuals don't get sick as often, while disease is easily spread in clusters of population.
    Last edited by BadBeeKeeper; 02-08-2017 at 04:55 PM. Reason: Fat-finger typo
    If you want to be successful, study successful people and do what they do.
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  18. #17
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Living in a semi urban area surrounded by blueberry fields, and which also hosts regular come-and-go treatment free survivor yards and the odd "neighbours, what neighbours??" research project....our local beekeepers have debated the wisdom of just running all colonies with robber screens on to eliminate drift. Seeley is advocating spacing to do the same.

    For most of us, spacing is impractical.

    I am pleased to see that Varroa research is gaining momentum, and increasingly the gene editing technologies now coming into wide use are pointing to a solution via tinkering with the Varroa genome. This offers not only a robust control tool, but the very real possibility of eradicating Varroa from our honey bee populations.

  19. #18
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Varroa mites – bees’ archenemies – have genetic holes in their armor

    http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2017/va...n-their-armor/

  20. #19
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    Quote Originally Posted by Delta Bay View Post
    Varroa mites – bees’ archenemies – have genetic holes in their armor

    http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2017/va...n-their-armor/
    Indeed, and given this technique is already used in controlling cattle ticks, offers huge promise, a welcome alternative to twisting the bee genome into a (meaningfully) Varroa resistant shape.

  21. #20
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    Default Re: Very wide spacing of hives (100m) reduces mite build up

    It makes perfect sense that frequent influx of new genetic material from other hives could result in a more aggressive mite/virus disease complex. As has already been pointed out, bees do not normally locate their hives right next to each other, so no doubt their is very little evolutionary resistance to diseases that thrive with a lot of hives in close proximity. And aren't we presuming that the natural altruistic response of a sick worker (whether from mites or viruses) will be to abandon the hive - and quite possibly wander into another hive?

    At what point should uniquely painted hives and robber screens become standard equipment for hives?
    Last edited by Boxelder; 12-06-2017 at 02:36 PM.

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