Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017 - Page 24
Page 24 of 25 FirstFirst ... 1422232425 LastLast
Results 461 to 480 of 488
  1. #461
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Thank you, Russ.
    David Matlock

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #462
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    My preferred smoker is a Dadant 4x7 with a heat guard. I was working on a Kelley and a Dadant side by side today. The Dadant has better fit and finish. I have a Dadant 4x7 and a 4x10. The 4x7 is a little more stable and handy than the 4x10. Heat guards reduce mishaps. I carry the smoker in the back of my truck in a stainless pot salvaged from a scrapyard with a 2" section of heavy gauge 4" iron pipe in the bottom of the pot so it won't tip over. I use a propane torch with a push button igniter to start the smoker. I mostly burn scrap wood shavings and dry punk wood for fuel.
    David Matlock

  4. #463
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    The reason that the bees of the Arnot Forest are famous is not because they are unusual, but because of their proximity to Dr. Tom Seeley. Nature selects for survival. That includes productivity, but, unfortunately, not docility. If the bees in one of my colonies are overly “twitchy” they experience Sudden Emergency Queen Cell Syndrome. Fortunately, that has not had to happen very often.
    David Matlock

  5. #464
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    If the bees in one of my colonies are overly “twitchy” they experience Sudden Emergency Queen Cell Syndrome.
    Funny!

  6. #465
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    “First catch your rabbit.” To keep bees treatment free, consider starting with a swarm or cutout with “good form”, that is, reasonable provenance of several generations of treatment free feral pedigree. Starting with bees that already have the uncommon characteristics of varroa resistance and virus tolerance and then breeding toward commonly found desirable domestic traits, such as gentleness, is easier than starting with common desirable traits and trying to select for the uncommon trait of strong varroa resistance.

    If there is a background feral or drone rich treatment free population in your area and you allow your colonies to naturally supersede their queens, then you will be leaning into traits of survivability. By eliminating aggressive queens and making increase from good colonies, you can select for such qualities as gentleness, productivity, and non-swarming as you choose. As a bonus, the population buildup of longstanding local feral stock will be reasonably synchronized with local nectar flows.
    David Matlock

  7. #466
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    If you’re not confident about what is going on, then do nothing right now or wait awhile and then do nothing. Whatever the bees are doing, most of the time there is a good reason for it. They know a good bit about being a bee. Show them some respect. They have good instincts for things like arranging their winter stores and superseding queens. Most of the problems of relatively new beekeepers are either (1) imagined or (2) self-inflicted. If you do something with the hive, then do it. Don’t do it half way because you’re not sure whether you should do it. If you’re not sure, then you probably shouldn’t do it or you should at least check with an experienced beekeeper before you do something. Not after, and certainly not after you’ve done it half-way. Or do what you want. You probably know more about it than I do anyway.
    Last edited by Riverderwent; 10-21-2019 at 11:17 PM.
    David Matlock

  8. #467
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    If you’re not sure, then you probably shouldn’t do it or you should at least check with an experienced beekeeper before you do something. Not after, and certainly not after you’ve done it half-way.
    GREAT advice, David. This is a lesson I have (unfortunately) had to learn more than once already. Somehow I fear I might stumble into this issue a few more times...

    Have a great week.

    Russ

  9. #468
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Having some treated commercial hives in the area is fine as long as they don’t crowd out feral bees by over foraging. Typically, because of commercial practices, there are relatively few drones in a commercial colony compared to a feral colony of comparable size. So feral hives have a disproportionately large influence on the genetics of colonies that have naturally superseded, locally raised and mated queens. This, along with the commercial practice of frequent requeening, is likely why some studies show disparity between the gene pools of feral and commercial colonies in the same geographic area.

    If you allow natural drone rearing by using foundationless frames in the brood area, over time your treatment free hives will also have a disproportionately large influence on local genetics. And anyway having drone congregation areas with some commercial influence combined with some sound and simple husbandry helps bend the curve toward positive traits such as gentleness and productivity. Depending on local conditions, the beekeeper can nurture the positive influence of both feral and commercial colonies by eliminating queens in aggressive colonies and allowing them to naturally replace the queen and by making any increase and replacement stock from healthy, productive, and gentle colonies.
    Last edited by Riverderwent; 10-23-2019 at 09:32 PM.
    David Matlock

  10. #469
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default

    Good post, David. As always, I enjoy reading about the thoughts you have about the genetic environment you are working in- it provides good insight for us mere mortals.
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  11. #470
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    I noticed this weekend that there is a remarkable amount of goldenrod blooming in central and southwest Arkansas right now.

    This afternoon, having more or less recovered from my fractured hip, I decided to inspect some hives and pull queen excluders and any unused supers. The weather was cool (60 degrees) and cloudy. When I pulled up to the first bee yard I expected to see some bees flying, but there was almost no activity. As I worked through the hives, despite my smokescreen and judicious and efficient (almost ninja like) movements, the bees decided that foul play was afoot and became more and more disturbed and defensive. They really don’t like being meddled with when their larder is full and the days are getting short. By using a sophisticated technique of lifting the back of the hive I determined that their larders were, in fact, full. After nine or so hives, we came to a mutual understanding that I would leave and come back in a day or two. They also not so kindly let me know that my jacket was not completely zipped up, and they had a few score of their finest guard bees escort me off the premises to avoid any misunderstandings.

    I proceeded (or as we say around here, went) to the next yard and made about the same amount of progress. I did determine that we had lost one colony over the late summer and fall, and we have around twenty-one production hives and a couple of nuc size colonies going into winter.
    David Matlock

  12. #471
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    6,602

    Cool Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    I noticed this weekend that there is a remarkable amount of goldenrod blooming in central and southwest Arkansas right now.

    This afternoon, having more or less recovered from my fractured hip, I decided to inspect some hives and pull queen excluders and any unused supers. The weather was cool (60 degrees) and cloudy. When I pulled up to the first bee yard I expected to see some bees flying, but there was almost no activity. As I worked through the hives, despite my smokescreen and judicious and efficient (almost ninja like) movements, the bees decided that foul play was afoot and became more and more disturbed and defensive. They really don’t like being meddled with when their larder is full and the days are getting short. By using a sophisticated technique of lifting the back of the hive I determined that their larders were, in fact, full. After nine or so hives, we came to a mutual understanding that I would leave and come back in a day or two. They also not so kindly let me know that my jacket was not completely zipped up, and they had a few score of their finest guard bees escort me off the premises to avoid any misunderstandings.

    I proceeded (or as we say around here, went) to the next yard and made about the same amount of progress. I did determine that we had lost one colony over the late summer and fall, and we have around twenty-one production hives and a couple of nuc size colonies going into winter.
    Strange that you would post this David. Been back down in the "Ark-La-Tex" for about a week now and noticed this years Goldenrod phenomena as well. I'm usually here a week or so later when its mostly bloomed out and was thinking about posing the question to you about its late season flow potential. I've seen aggressive behavior when bees are on a flow but the conditions aren't quite right for flight so I'll take the flow potential as a definite maybe. Forecast for good flying weather dosent look particularly optimistic so, perhaps, its a moot point anyway.
    Btw, glad to hear your recovery is going well.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  13. #472
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    Strange that you would post this David. Been back down in the "Ark-La-Tex" for about a week now and noticed this years Goldenrod phenomena as well. I'm usually here a week or so later when its mostly bloomed out and was thinking about posing the question to you about its late season flow potential. I've seen aggressive behavior when bees are on a flow but the conditions aren't quite right for flight so I'll take the flow potential as a definite maybe. Forecast for good flying weather dosent look particularly optimistic so, perhaps, its a moot point anyway.
    Btw, glad to hear your recovery is going well.
    The goldenrod bloom this year seems late to me, and the amount north of the Louisiana line is like nothing I've seen in recent years.
    David Matlock

  14. #473
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    For me, a beehive consists of a bottom board, eight-frame medium hive boxes, twenty-four foundationless frames (placed in the bottom three hive boxes), frames with plastic foundation with standard size cells (placed in the fourth and higher hive boxes which function as honey supers), a metal queen excluder placed above the third hive box, an inner cover with an approximately 2" hole in the center and a ⅜" by 1" notch in the upper front rim for ventilation, and a telescoping outer cover. The bottom board has a ⅜” rim on top (which makes the entrance ⅜” high by about 13˝” wide). In my location with my bees, this prevents rodents from entering the hives in winter, is defensible, and is not overly crowded during flows. The bottom rim of the bottom board is roughly 1˝” high. I purchase frames, but the other equipment is handmade from cedar and unpainted. The decking of the bottom boards and outer covers is cedar. The decking of the inner covers is thin scrap luann or interior plywood. The outer covers are covered with aluminum flashing. Construction is with Titebond II and staples, with screws for any repairs to honey supers. I use welded metal hive stands about fourteen inches high and about ten feet long.

    I place the queen excluders above the third box and remove them or place them above the top hive box in winter to avoid isolating the queen from the warmth of the cluster. My bees are derived from local, generally frugal, feral stock, and they winter in three or sometimes four eight frame medium boxes with no supplemental feeding.
    Last edited by Riverderwent; 10-30-2019 at 05:15 PM.
    David Matlock

  15. #474
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Good report, David. I think you are where many of us hope to be someday.

    Thank you for outlining what is working for you.

    Russ

  16. #475
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    When I walk from the truck to the hives, two of the things I carry are a cast aluminum frame grabber like this: http://www.amazon.com/Frame-Grip-Hol...t_feature_div;

    and a stainless steel hive tool like this: http://www.amazon.com/KINGLAKE-Beeke...Y8MG5FZFH2W137.

    I spray paint them with hi-vis fluorescent yellow paint.

    Right now they’re both sitting on top of a hive at one of my bee yards because they’ll stay but they don’t heel.
    Last edited by Riverderwent; 11-01-2019 at 10:48 AM.
    David Matlock

  17. #476
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    David Matlock

  18. #477
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    Fall swarm?
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  19. #478
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    Fall swarm?
    Just a box on a tree. This is what my swarm traps look like.
    David Matlock

  20. #479

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post

    Right now they’re both sitting on top of a hive at one of my bee yards because they’ll stay but they don’t heel.
    Sorry to hear, hope you get better soon.

    Your messages are like a crossword puzzle for a person not speaking english as mother language.
    I can imagine the blink in your eyes. Laughter and humor makes one live longer.

  21. #480
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,819

    Default Re: Riverderwent Survival Treatment Free 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    Right now they’re both sitting on top of a hive at one of my bee yards because they’ll stay but they don’t heel.
    Too funny. Maybe you can teach them to come when you whistle?
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

Page 24 of 25 FirstFirst ... 1422232425 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •