A Sad Week for Pooh Bear - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    I have a Varrox vapor and it works quite well. I used Wood Bleach as the source of OA as many others have done on these forums.

    Yes treating from the top was a concern but after reading several posts about here on beesource it seems that people have had success with it. Now I'm not so sure; I even hit one the hives for an extra treatment just to be sure (fat lot of food that did me).

    Since I can now manipulate the hive boxes any which I want for next year I'm going to replace the solid bottom board on one with a SBB and then add in a shim box below both that will allow me to snake in a vapor wand at the very base of the hive. The opening for the wands will be at the rear of the box so no bees to deal with and the wands will be low enough not to be concerned about melting wax / fire. (Would have to take trays out for treatment - obviously)

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    Sorry for the typos. Working from my phone and it likes to correct me from time to time

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,080

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    Sorry to hear about your troubles. I think everything has been covered but, I will give my two cents too. The older the hives get and the better they do the harder they are to keep alive. The more bees that the hives raise means they are also raising more mites. I was treatment free my first couple years and had never lost a hive. I made it up to 20 or so hives by my second year and then took a hard hit late during my second summer. I now treat regularly and keep good mite counts. Now I still loose some hives but, I also make splits so typically I make more than I loose and sell the extras.

    I will also give my two cents on Oxalic. I think it is a great product that has it's place in the mite killing tool box. But, I think there are going to be some upset beekeepers who are putting all their faith in it. All you have to do is read the treads on mites and someone is always recommending it like it is the best thing out there. If you do some further research coming from across the pond you will find that the recommendation of 3 treatments a week apart is not good enough when there is brood present. They are finding 4-5 treatments closer together are working better. Oxalic vapor and dribble have there place either work great when the hives are broodless, or for treating swarms or packages, treating splits 19 days after making them up or for cleaning up mites after say a treatment of one strip of Maqs. As with any treatment doing mite counts after a treatment is always a good idea.

    Look at the bright side at least you know now early into the year that you will need bees next spring. You have plenty of time to get in early on someones list for bees next spring. Do everything you can to save your drawn comb and your new hives next spring will have a big head start. All this is JMHO so take it with a grain of salt.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,467

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    Quote Originally Posted by D Coates View Post
    My findings as well. I've bought various "mite resistant" queens early on from different breeders through the years.
    I am grateful for the efforts of folks such as those working in the bee lab in Baton Rouge. They brought Russian genetics into the greater American gene pool. I'm not sure we fully comprehend all the mechanisms for mite tolerance or mite resistance that those Russian bees brought with them. But I'm just not enamored with queens that result from selective breeding for hygienic traits alone without regard for those other known or unknown mechanisms. Overly specific breeding approaches can hit the target but miss the aim. (Is somebody writing all these down.)
    David. The way you want to keep bees is most likely at least as good as any way that I could suggest. Probably better.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    1,123

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    Quote Originally Posted by D Coates View Post
    My findings as well. I've bought various "mite resistant" queens early on from different breeders through the years. My first year I ignored mites with my 2 hives and they did fine. My 2nd year I played around and tried a few things and had a loss with my then 5 hives. Third year I was up to 8-9 hives and lost 2-3 but still didn't get serious. Year 4, 15 hives and went cold turkey. Lost 14 of them and the 15th superceded the queen early in the season. Having to buy 14 hives worth of bees taught me my lesson well. For those who don't have to treat or manipulate to control mites, great!, I'm seriously happy for you. If I didn't have to treat or manipulate for 20-30 hives, I'd be ramping up queen production to sell them for stupid money in small volumes. Since I've gotten serious and treat and feed going into winter my losses are negligible (-10% on 30+ hives & nucs) and easily handled by my treated and overwintered nucs.
    Almost my same experience The first couple of years there is so much to learn that mite control did not seem so important. Then you get hit with the losses... Now that I take it really seriously, the losses are way down, the colony populations are way up, I have patterns set up and it is time to learn queen rearing.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    Grafted daughter queens from the commercial operation queens. I tried a new little bee experiment on all of my new nuc hives this season.
    Instead of treating them with the usual oav around this time, all hives went brood less manipulation resetting the mite button.
    With a newly mated Autumn queen they will never went brood less this winter.
    All the cap broods with the mites went to the one hygienic hive with a newly mated
    queen laying 2 weeks ago. Empty drawn comb from the consolidation will be use for all the
    queens to lay in fresh eggs. All the attaching bees on the frames got brushed off into the empty drawn frames to make
    a very compact nuc hive going into winter. Of course, with a brood less/egg less hive I can oav if I wanted to with my homemade
    oav gadget under the hive, oav crystals generating unit and the glycerine oav mite strips. Wanting to
    repeat this experiment next year I have to save some mites too as we have the most aggressive mites here. This is another way to keep the mites in check here. All the big fat winter bees that recently emerged from the mite free environment will enjoy a quiet
    winter. It only took me 1 day to manipulate them all on a weekend. Easily be done if you have
    2 to 10 hives. Some queens even laid across the boundary more
    than what these young nurse bees can handle. So the saying that queen will only lay up to what the
    bees can cover the broods is no longer true from my experience. Then I have some queens that never lay across the boundary as those are
    the exception. Will not use those for my expansion program. Maybe she can sense the winter bees will live longer taking
    up this chore. Then again the newly mated Autumn queens thinking it is still early Spring time building up their brood nest for the winter.
    Big fat mite free emerging winter bees. Expected to see an explosive bee growth this coming Spring. Actively managing the bees through out
    this winter. Balancing out queen grafting, mite control and hive manipulation all at the same time!
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Deerfield, Illinois
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: A Sad Week for Pooh Bear

    I would be careful freezing and keeping diseased frames. I think that works for wax moths, but I take the dark frames that look diseased and just toss them. It is rather easy to tell if they look unhealthy regardless of the disease. Probably toss about 30% of frames in brood boxes every year and about 5% of super frames. Every year I test for AFB.This year I will send some to the Lab but I suspect Mites or related viruses.
    Quote Originally Posted by bee keeper chef View Post
    Save and freeze all the comb if you are going forward and get more bees use them next year. Drawn comb and comb with honey will get new bees or a nuc off to a real good start

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •