Questions about removing supers and storing equipment
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Johnstown, OH
    Posts
    273

    Default Questions about removing supers and storing equipment

    Hello. A follow-up to my previous, way-too-long thread. Can anyone give some insight and help out? Thanks

    Can I take a super off now and extract in 2-3 weeks?
    Wasn't originally planning on having much harvest or buying an extractor until next year, but now I have just one super to extract but decided to just go ahead and get the extractor now that I was planning on purchasing later. Of course, I waiting too long to order the extractor and now it's backordered I want to take the fully capped super off now because I need to do a mite treatment. How long can I wait between removing it and extracting it since now I'll need to wait for my extractor to arrive? And what are your suggestions for storing it until I can extract? I was thinking I could put it in my basement (temp controlled, no mice or pests, etc.). Is that okay?

    What are your recommendations for storing frames of drawn comb?
    Once I extract, what's the best way to store the frames and drawn comb for next season? I've heard that it's good to freeze them first, but for how long?

    Thanks a million for any suggestions you can give!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Questions about removing supers and storing equipment

    Do you have SHB in your hive? If so, then more vigilance needs to occur whenever the super is off the stack.

    Storage for a couple of days might be OK (depending on the prevalence of SHB ad temps); for storage for weeks , I'd freeze the frames for several days then store them at room temp in a place where SHB can't get at them again.

    But I have a question: Don't you also have a hive that has only minimal stores that you are frantically trying to feed enough to scrape by? (Maybe I am confusing your situation with someone else's?) But if it is you, then why are you extracting honey that can be used to make sure the under-supplied colony will survive? In my world the bees get enough chow (through frames of donor honey or syrup feeding) before any surplus is mine to take.

    As far as after an extraction, many people allow the bees to lick the frames dry by putting the super back on for a couple of days. That, once again, exposes the frames to SHB, so if that is an issue another round of freezing and then storage in a place where SHB, wax moths and mice can't get at them is best. I store frames in their boxes with the box set down in an upturned wooden telecover, with another wooden telecover on top, and concrete block on top of that. I keep them in my unheated, northern NY barn on a bench.

    Although I have some, I don't have much of an issue with SHB (and my frigid winter temps would do them in), and I've even stored whole frames of capped honey this way w/o preliminary trips to the freezer. But then, for frames taken off in October/early November when I've finally packed up my hives - my whole farm could be described as a freezer every night until mid-April. My two biggest risks are wax moths and rodents.

    Enj.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
    Posts
    2,569

    Default Re: Questions about removing supers and storing equipment

    To add to to what Enj. said, I don't worry about SHB here in Wisconsin, but I pay attention to wax moths. I avoid them by storing combs under fluorescent light. Secondly, when extracting the super if it is not warm it is going to be hard to get the honey to come off the frames. I suggest finding a way to warm it to 90 degrees before you start.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Johnstown, OH
    Posts
    273

    Default Re: Questions about removing supers and storing equipment

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    But I have a question: Don't you also have a hive that has only minimal stores that you are frantically trying to feed enough to scrape by? (Maybe I am confusing your situation with someone else's?) But if it is you, then why are you extracting honey that can be used to make sure the under-supplied colony will survive? In my world the bees get enough chow (through frames of donor honey or syrup feeding) before any surplus is mine to take.
    Enj, yes that was me. Okay, scratch all of my above posts on this thread! Got some good advice on a phone call with an experienced beekeeper and I have a new, much more logical plan. I'm going to combine the weak hive with the strong and leave the entire super on to overwinter. The rest of the discussion and some follow-up questions are on a previous thread:
    https://www.beesource.com/forums/show...y-empty-deeps-
    Last edited by clarekate; 10-12-2016 at 05:19 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •