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Thread: Bee bee trees

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Romney, IN, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Well, I got several Evodia trees about seven years ago. I have three left. Every time they get close to some size, we get temps down to say, -14 or so, and they freeze back to the ground. They are supposed to be hardy in Zone five, but just surviving doesn't cut it for me. I sure wanted something to flower in the fall. Here, Locust is the main flow in the spring. After that, it's clover and soybeans. I planted several Basswood trees. Those are just getting big enough to bloom, but no bees as yet. It seems like every nursery cuts the taproot which really sets the tree back.

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Bethpage, TN, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Quote Originally Posted by judyv47954 View Post
    Well, I got several Evodia trees about seven years ago. I have three left. Every time they get close to some size, we get temps down to say, -14 or so, and they freeze back to the ground. They are supposed to be hardy in Zone five, but just surviving doesn't cut it for me. I sure wanted something to flower in the fall. Here, Locust is the main flow in the spring. After that, it's clover and soybeans. I planted several Basswood trees. Those are just getting big enough to bloom, but no bees as yet. It seems like every nursery cuts the taproot which really sets the tree back.
    We don't cut the taproot. We use a root pruning container that encourages the tree to make feeder roots. A container full of non circling roots will out perform any bare root or smooth pot tree. Transplanting any tree will cause a delay in growth the year it is planted but, after that, ours generally grow well.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    When is the best time to take cuttings to grow it frok the cuttings?
    How well do they grow roots by cutting method?

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Bethpage, TN, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Quote Originally Posted by scituatema View Post
    When is the best time to take cuttings to grow it frok the cuttings?
    How well do they grow roots by cutting method?
    Basswoods are difficult from cuttings. I am trying the first time this year. I will know more in a few months

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Quote Originally Posted by Farmer Dave View Post
    Basswoods are difficult from cuttings. I am trying the first time this year. I will know more in a few months
    How about bee bee tree cuttings?

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Romney, IN, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Quote Originally Posted by Farmer Dave View Post
    We don't cut the taproot. We use a root pruning container that encourages the tree to make feeder roots. A container full of non circling roots will out perform any bare root or smooth pot tree. Transplanting any tree will cause a delay in growth the year it is planted but, after that, ours generally grow well.
    The Basswood had the central taproot cut, not the evodia. I got those as small starts. Even the nut tree that I got a couple of years ago had the taproot cut.
    I can grow peach trees here, so why so much trouble with the evodia?

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Bethpage, TN, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Quote Originally Posted by judyv47954 View Post
    The Basswood had the central taproot cut, not the evodia. I got those as small starts. Even the nut tree that I got a couple of years ago had the taproot cut.
    I can grow peach trees here, so why so much trouble with the evodia?
    Evodia can be tough to grow. It is susceptible to several soil fungi and can get freeze damage especially when young. Field grown nursery stock usually has a severed taproot which is hard on the tree. That is why I like the root pruning containers. It solves the taproot problem without trauma to the tree.
    Some people grow Evodia with no trouble, others struggle to keep it alive. Soil type, soil nutrition, competition with grass, disease, deer and rabbits, the reasons have no end.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Romney, IN, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Bee bee trees

    Yes, I have tree collars on my evodias, as well as my fruit trees, because of the rabbits.
    I might try to start cuttings this year and plant them as understory trees along the creek where they might get more shelter from the wind.

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