Anyone sell in large urban areas? pricing? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Oct 2011
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    I got a call Sunday morning from my sister in Manhattan. She was at a farmers market and a guy had his nyc local honey for sale. He had $10 for 8 ounces of light honey and $20 for dark per 8 ounces.

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  3. #22
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    Jun 2012
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    Suffolk Co, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigGun View Post
    I got a call Sunday morning from my sister in Manhattan. She was at a farmers market and a guy had his nyc local honey for sale. He had $10 for 8 ounces of light honey and $20 for dark per 8 ounces.
    Yup.
    The flip side is a fairly large non NYC metro area beekeeper who sells at many of the NYC green markets charges $8.00/lb for his honey
    in plastic bottles (urban bohemians don't care for plastic, by and large) and is glad to get it. He can't get that price where he's from and has a lot of it to move.
    It's conceivable the price range at a NYC green market for a pound of honey is $8 to $25 and the sellers make sales.

  4. #23
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    Jul 2015
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    To me this topic is fascinating, who among us remembers Economics 101 and all the hours discussing Maslow's hierarchy of needs and economists' supply and demand curves!?!?!

    I know there are absolutely buyers at those prices in smaller quantities, I think it is just a question of how much volume across what period of time.

    My only observation of real life high(er) volume sales in the cumulative $20-24/lb range was either last season, or the one before, at the premier hipster market here in Boston named SOWA/NEOM. A local honey vendor was working the crowd fairly well, people always stopped by to listen, many took samples and some were leaving with product. They had a range of products and prices, but the most popular item seemed to be 4oz glass hex jars that they priced at either $5 or $6 each, resulting in an effective price of $20-24/lb not including the cost of the hex jar, label and so on.

    We watched for quite some time to gauge activity, then came back much later in the day to determine what type of total volume they were doing. We guessed they probably moved fifty or sixty of the 4oz hex jars at that price, but not much else seemed to have had traction. Assuming the price was $6 and not $5 for each hex jar (my mind is failing in old age) and a few other sales as well, they probably took down $400+ cash for the six hour market.

    This is real money for sure, but the market table fee there is I think $65, plus parking, plus gas and time to drive in and out of Boston (they had an hour ride each way) not including the cost of the hex jars, labor and six hours for the market plus a couple hours for setup/take down. They may have cumulatively made $24/lb before accounting for costs, but at least in that location, at that price, on that particular day, the total sales numbers would have been a disappointment to me after deducting our costs. Perhaps it was just a lousy day for sales, we have all had them, but the other possibility is their price for larger quantities was just too high to encourage any volume. I think in these hip urban communities five or six bucks is truly pocket change, completely disregarded to satisfy any impulse buy, but twenty something dollars for a one pound jar will cause potential buyers to stop and think about that whole hierarchy of needs thing - which we try to avoid!

    My only other data point is from friends who are much closer to downtown Boston while we are up on the New Hampshire border, they also sell in the $12-14/lb range and with a good market in an affluent neighborhood of Boston they say they often move just about $600 of product in a four hour farmers market. It sure isn't $25/lb, but I think many would still be quite envious!

  5. #24
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    Clinton, TN
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Quote Originally Posted by clyderoad View Post
    Yup.
    The flip side is a fairly large non NYC metro area beekeeper who sells at many of the NYC green markets charges $8.00/lb for his honey
    in plastic bottles (urban bohemians don't care for plastic, by and large) and is glad to get it. He can't get that price where he's from and has a lot of it to move.
    It's conceivable the price range at a NYC green market for a pound of honey is $8 to $25 and the sellers make sales.
    Good point. I like the idea of bottling and packaging in front of them but if you are bottling from a plastic bucket with a honey gate that might be a huge red flag for these folks. Probably will want a stainless bottling tank.
    Luke 24:42 - And they gave him a piece of a broiled fish, and honeycomb. And Jesus took it, and did eat it before them.

  6. #25
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamBeal View Post
    Good point. I like the idea of bottling and packaging in front of them but if you are bottling from a plastic bucket with a honey gate that might be a huge red flag for these folks. Probably will want a stainless bottling tank.
    I don't know about plastic bottling buckets and how they would react-no bottling at the markets here.
    They sure like glass though and if it says Mason on it, all the more.

  7. #26
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    My urban sales is basically signs at the bee yard that say call or text with a number. Pretty primitive.

    Was hoping to use all glass mason jars. They say "made in USA" right on the jar plus I can buy them locally from many places.
    Turned out people wanted plastic bears so I bought and sold about 500 twelve-ounce bears at $5 a bear. Then something clicked around July and alluva sudden everyone wants it in glass. $20/quart.

    I think there is a learning curve where you have to melt the face off one of them bears in the microwave then you decide glass is better. I hod to do it once. Maybe they're recycling the bears.
    Internet credibility is an oxymoron

  8. #27
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    Jan 2017
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    Houston, Texas
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    I'm new to bees and honey, but I started a different small business years ago and sell to high end clients all around the world. Very similar to what you are are saying, keep it on a small scale & charge more. I can say that after 10 years with that business that it helps you still like it when things are tough, keeps the stress down!
    I have found that people will pay what they think it's worth. They honestly don't care what your competition, or other beekeepers think about your prices. Either they can afford it and want it, or can't afford it or don't want it. It's that simple. I will say I've seen people with more money than brains pass up a high quality product because it was priced too low. You might say that you don't want that customer, but I'll take them any day of the week. Business isn't about other's feelings. If you take good care of your bees, let them take good care of you.

  9. #28
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    Feb 2017
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    St. Croix County, Wisconsin, USA
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Instead of bottling honey right in front of them perhaps cutting comb honey right from the frame would be more attractive to them. Just a thought.

  10. #29
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Quote Originally Posted by SandyCreekApiary View Post
    Instead of bottling honey right in front of them perhaps cutting comb honey right from the frame would be more attractive to them. Just a thought.
    Handling honey that's not in a sealed container will bring in bees who are curious. Bees hanging around your booth is an excellent way to spook customers.
    Ninja, is not in the dictionary. Well played Ninja's, well played...

  11. #30
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    True - Knockin, bobbybee.

  12. #31
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    Aug 2017
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    Chicago
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Wanted to update with what I've been pricing my honey at. This is my first honey harvest, I took one super and proceeded to bottle 36lbs of honey. I bought sleek straight-sided glass bottles with black caps, made 'upscale' labels and shrink seal the jars. I have been charging in Chicago:

    4oz: $6
    6oz: $8

    I've gotten comments from some urban 30-something women (friends) that I should be charging more. For a super local product with an upper-middle class demographic, I can probably go as high as $10 for a 4oz. I've only been selling in my social circles so far, but might try the neighborhood at $7 & $9.

  13. #32
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Went snoopin' at the farmer's market in Urbana, Illinois this morning.
    Prices at one stand were comparable to what I charge.
    Another had it sky high and was calling it "Queen Anne's Lace" honey.

    Both people got upset because another beekeeper was asking "how much?".
    Wanted to know where I was selling my honey at. I told them "at my house in Champaign".
    What a buzz kill.
    Internet credibility is an oxymoron

  14. #33
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    Mar 2015
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    St Louis, Missouri, USA
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    Default Re: Anyne sell in large urban areas? pricing?

    Quote Originally Posted by aunt betty View Post
    Another had it sky high and was calling it "Queen Anne's Lace" honey.
    I've got a lot of Queen Anne's Lace. I've never seen a honey bee on it.

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