MAQS and Internal Hive Temps
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Keene, NH, USA
    Posts
    254

    Default MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    My beekeeping buddy, Rick, and I each purchased Broodminder Hive Monitoring Systems at EAS. The system includes a hive scale and 2 internal monitors, 1 for just temperature, the other for RH and temp. While I think the internal temp and RH will be most interesting in winter, Rick had what I think is a great question about treating hives with MAQS when the instructions say to use it only between 65-90º with possible queen issues above 90. Regardless of the ambient temperatures during the week, both of us are seeing our hives maintaining a consistent internal temp between 92-95, as expected. If the internal hive temperature is 95ish, what difference does the ambient temp make? It seems the internal hive temp is what is going to matter and will–during the summer–always be above 90º. Thoughts?

    John
    11 yrs, TF 6 yrs, moved to OAV in 2014, MAQS 2016. 6 hives and 5 nucs Zone 4B
    www.nhbees.wordpress.com

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Robeson County, North Carolina
    Posts
    739

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    Just a WAG, but pesticide labels are designed around the "most" common denominator. Since not everyone monitors internal hive temperature, daily high ambient air temperature is used as a guideline. And there is certainly a few corporate lawyers reviewing the labels for liability reasons. You do pose a very good question though. Temperature range with MAQS really limits our treatment times here.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    West Jordan, UT, USA
    Posts
    1,140

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    The bees will keep the brood cluster at about 94*F. Outside the cluster, temps may be higher or lower than that. When ambient temps are lower, outside the cluster temps will likely be lower. The more stressors you place on the bees at one time, the more likely you are to see problems. Heat + MAQS = high stress. So follow the instructions to keep stress to a minimum.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    3,408

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    The bees move away from the strips when you put them in the hive, so you have to be careful not to use them when it's above 90F outside -- the bees are not going to control the temp in the brood nest very well for a couple days until the concentration drops. That means the temp can get too high both for the brood and for the MAQS vaporization, resulting in too high a concentration of formic acid. Below the minimum temp, the formic acid won't penetrate the hive properly, and you will miss a lot of phoretic mites.

    I think it's safe to say the people who developed them did their homework and figured out the optimum treatment conditions.

    I need to order some tonight, it's coming up on treatment time here....

    Peter

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Creal Springs, IL
    Posts
    233

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    I picked up some MAQS couple days ago from a local beekeeping supplier. They said a change in the labeling on this product is fixing to come out, reducing the numbers of strips to use from two...to one. They recommended using only one strip. AND too hot to do it now.

    Has anybody else heard of this.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,469

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    Quote Originally Posted by psfred View Post
    The bees move away from the strips when you put them in the hive, so you have to be careful not to use them when it's above 90F outside -- the bees are not going to control the temp in the brood nest very well for a couple days until the concentration drops. That means the temp can get too high both for the brood and for the MAQS vaporization, resulting in too high a concentration of formic acid. Below the minimum temp, the formic acid won't penetrate the hive properly, and you will miss a lot of phoretic mites.

    I think it's safe to say the people who developed them did their homework and figured out the optimum treatment conditions.

    I need to order some tonight, it's coming up on treatment time here....

    Peter
    Good point. Well explained!
    Frank

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    1,039

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    Quote Originally Posted by Eyeshooter View Post
    My beekeeping buddy, Rick, and I each purchased Broodminder Hive Monitoring Systems at EAS. The system includes a hive scale and 2 internal monitors, 1 for just temperature, the other for RH and temp. While I think the internal temp and RH will be most interesting in winter, Rick had what I think is a great question about treating hives with MAQS when the instructions say to use it only between 65-90º with possible queen issues above 90. Regardless of the ambient temperatures during the week, both of us are seeing our hives maintaining a consistent internal temp between 92-95, as expected. If the internal hive temperature is 95ish, what difference does the ambient temp make? It seems the internal hive temp is what is going to matter and will–during the summer–always be above 90º. Thoughts?

    John
    In my personal experience MASQ is a waste of money. Several beekeepers had very very poor success and lost hundreds of hives last year. The company had every excuse in the book of what the beekeeper did wrong. Treated and untreated colonies in my experience mite counts did nit change. Dont waste your money.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    3,080

    Default Re: MAQS and Internal Hive Temps

    The instructions I've followed for MAQS and 50% formic acid are to place the material right above the broodnest, and the whole purpose in doing so is that the bees provide the correct temperature to vaporize the formic acid at the correct rate. If it were not for the bees regulating hive temperature, the rate of acid release would be all over the place, and way too low at lower temperatures.

    I've had good luck with both MAQS and the WVU method. But read the directions and follow them closely.

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