How long does a laying worker live? - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    2,105

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    I added eggs in July, not sure what date, and they did not make a queen cell. They did make a queen cell on their own when I asked whether that could be a queen. At the moment the top 2 boxes that I moved out of the apiary are being robbed out. Oddly they seemed to have young and furry workers in them.

    Would they fail to cap drones? because those eyes are going purple.

    Have set up another hive stand. Will try to get some pictures. it is fairly easy to winter down here as long as they don't lay a bunch of brood late
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kirksville, Missouri USA
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    1,765

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    Laying worker hives don't generally make emergency queen cells unless you give them frames of brood once a week for 3 weeks strait, then they can start queen cells. They think they are queenright, but after several weeks of brood present, the laying worker are suppressed and they then see the need to make a queen. A better description of a laying worker hive is, they think they are queenright, but something is not quite right, so they eventually attempt to supersede but can't do it with their own eggs. Supersedure is done with a built cell specific for that task, and they are the only ones that can lay in it. When the egg/brood frames suppress the LW, then they utilize emergency queen cell building, which involves current eggs in regular cells, which are now fertile from another hive.

    I don't know what to tell you about the purple eye drones, but LW hives are always messy drone patterns. Maybe they are running out of the resources to get the job done. Maybe someone can explain that one.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    2,105

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    It was lavender eyed drones and they were capped today when I went out. The top 2 boxes are being cleaned out by bees from other hives, I don't know how young the youngest workers were but they either found a hive, died or are flying around confused. about to go into the bottom 2, where I put my purchased queen, and decide what to do. I'm guessing use her for a split from the big hive, and my 2nd queen either sell or if the big hive can spare the bees, use her for a second split, and shut them down tight to prevent robbing? Drive the laying worker hive off my property a bit and dump the bees?
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    2,105

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    well I do not have the bees to use both queens from the big hive, so I did a re-dump at a distance of the laying worker hive, farther distance, and I have the queen in there, still in her cage, cork still over the candy. I pulled the drones and fed them to my hens, opening the cells. I found 3 mites. out of both sides of a frame, and part of another, that is not too bad. I like to check.

    I have to pull enough frames of bees from the big hive for the 2nd queen in the morning. (if I had ordered one you know she would have died in shipment, murphy's law being what it is.) wish me luck on the LW bunch. they were making queen cells, it is my hope that they will accept the queen
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    2,105

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    Update: Both queens are still alive. I used a push in marking cage over the one in the spot where the old laying worker hive was. The workers in with the other queen were greatly diminished, possibly due to lack of water, and there weren't many to start with , the newspaper above had held the laying worker bees out of the queen's nuc. so I made #8 hardware cloth cages about 6 inches long and as tall as the comb would allow, and both queens are in them. Hives are fed, newspaper is out of the moved low number hive, but they have a super robber screen and are well ventilated now. Lots of feed in that nuc.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    2,105

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    whoever said I would fail was fairly correct. to date both queens are alive only because I built them screened cages. the laying worker nuc, one box, still has laying workers. the queen is alive and has her servants but with the screen over her I couldn't see if there were eggs, hope the photos will tell me more.

    The nuc I started with bees from the big hive and the laying worker hive has dwindled to maybe 25 bees, the queen and her attendants are alive inside their cage, the robber screen prevented robbery but apparently bees get out and get lost and don't make it home. going to try to split my big hive tomorrow and at least get enough nurse bees and foragers to get this one going. Going to try to sell the queen from the laying worker hive and dump the hive half a mile away, removing the box from its current position. Photos later, have to tend the dogs
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    2,105

    Default Re: How long does a laying worker live?

    I am kind of sorry I dumped the laying workers and took their hive down, in time they would have just died out and I didn't need to feed them. They did not manage to join another hive and are presently living in a bait hive with no comb unless they build some. But hey, they will die out in their too, they just won't make any honey while they are doing it.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

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