Move to foundationless? - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 53 of 53
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Dutchess County, NY, USA
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    I have no idea how many hives we are going to end up with. This has started as a "hobby". We'll see if it grows into something bigger.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,057

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    Jwcarlson
    Make sure that your goal and your management methods can be scaled together. If your goal is to get to 25 or 50 production colonies I'd highly doubt foundationless is a sound management choice. That's all I'm saying. If all you want is a couple hives in your backyard. Don't mind a jigsaw puzzle of combs to deal with when swapping frames from colony to colony. And don't mind if you get more than whatever honey your family needs to eat... go for it.
    I agree with this. I am a cheep skate and also don't want to sell stuff. I want it for my family. I really like the ideal of adding lots of boxes at once but don't like the ideal of pouring money to stuff just so I can do it. I figured I might not be good at it, if I end up having a "green thumb" with bees, I will want all the stuff that makes it better. If I kill them every year now I lose nothing but time. It is a sorta which came first the egg or chicken. When I start buying stuff I want to "know" I have an avenue to recoup from the bees.

    I would like to have foundation but would not like to make a job out of it to justify having it. I don't mind the piddleing around but don't want a job. I do like what the guy that has the honor stand does. If I could put it in a stand or get someone else to do the selling I might consider expanding and then I would spend the money to streamline. I feel most on here are in it for the money and it makes sense to cut down on the time invested in management.
    I do agree with your points on this.
    gww

    Ps I also agree that since this is what I am doing now that it is nice to see others experiances and learn some tricks to making it work.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    6,034

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    Quote Originally Posted by JimH845 View Post
    I have no idea how many hives we are going to end up with. This has started as a "hobby". We'll see if it grows into something bigger.
    Don't be hesitant to change, that's all I'm saying. Wish you the best of luck Fluidity in your beekeeping practices are crucial.

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    Ps I also agree that since this is what I am doing now that it is nice to see others experiances and learn some tricks to making it work.
    Certainly not some sort of referendum on your beekeeping style. I wish there was more vocal "opposition" on here to some of the lunacy promoted on here when I was first starting. To an extent I ignored what little there was. I think people get worn down trying to talk sense... so eventually they drop out of the pool. And it only takes one or two zealots to make things sound like a real good idea.

    I just try to be honest about it. I still use foundationless (because I like giving them somewhere to put drone brood instead of between boxes and drawing out foundation a little goofy). And there's still frustration with it even between drawn brood frames. I actually just straighted out a really really wavy comb of drone cells in a colony last week. It's a nice little reminder of how screwed up everything can get with foundationless if you let it.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Nashville, TN, USA
    Posts
    144

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    As someone who is also mostly foundationless and moving away from it, that's why I like the idea of cutting sheets of plastic in half and centering them in the frame. You get the straight start of foundationless with the open areas to allow them to build what they want on both sides. Halving the sheets also stretches your dollar a lot farther (although admittedly it's still money you wouldn't have spent going 100% foundationless). My time is more valuable than the cost of foundation.

    I'm expanding my apiary and I don't have time to straighten comb. If I were staying with a few hives, say five or less, I wouldn't bother, but it's incredibly frustrating having to straighten comb and rubberband it to hold it straight inside the frame. On top of that, I have many frames that were started off center on the comb guide that will never be perfect (I used Kelly F-style frames, which were purpose-designed for foundationless).

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    6,034

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    Quote Originally Posted by bsharp View Post
    I'm expanding my apiary and I don't have time to straighten comb.
    Well said, bsharp. I lost focus on what inspections are all about because I was constantly tweaking combs. That's what made me step back. I realized I was skipping the fundamentals to chase some silly ideal.

    Glad I got over it.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Dutchtown,Louisiana,USA
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    If you want to try foundationless just do it. Make sure the hive is level and give them a starter strip. Plenty more time before the final results but every frame so far looks just like this with no intervention from me.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    6,034

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    Quote Originally Posted by dtrooster View Post
    Plenty more time before the final results but every frame so far looks just like this with no intervention from me.
    So did my first 50-75 foundationless frames too.

    There's a little bit of a luck aspect to this too, don't get me wrong. My first few colonies were flawless comb builders. Then I ran upon a she-beast of wide comb building monsters who also liked to take 90 degree turns for no reason and ignore starter strips. I don't wish them on anyone, but someday you too will likely skip merrily into foundationless martyrdom as I did.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Dutchtown,Louisiana,USA
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    The frames they made just for honey stores are extra thick but I don't see that as a problem. Some people run 9 or even 8 frames in a 10 frame box to get that on purpose. You're right tho it's to soon to have an opinion but so far so good. Plastic on the other hand has already been a pain in the ***, but to early for that too

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,407

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    That's the other side of it. Plastic can be a real pain as well. I get lots of finny stuff even after rolling extra wax on it. I'm even finding that the queen doesn't like to lay in it if she has an alternative. I found that surprising. That said I have some plastic (bought 72 medium frames today). I use it especially in my partial boxes. Say I'm moving a few frames of honey out of the brood nest but don't have enough to fill a box. Just put plastic in the remaining slots and there won't be big surprises when I come back. If it gets drawn out, its a bonus. But if I relied on just plastic, well I could see problems with that too.

    Its all about learning about the limitations of different approaches and avoiding big messes. And those wonky combs? I need some extra wax to paint that %&%($* plastic

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Warren County, NJ, USA
    Posts
    540

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    Show and tell!
    My foundationless looks just like roosters. My foundation on the other hand...well, not all are as bad as this. And we all know what bad foundationless looks like. image.jpgimage.jpg

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Morro Bay, California, USA
    Posts
    2,270

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    My preference:
    1) Wire and Wax -- just catching the scent when slipping in a new fresh wax "medium brood" foundation makes me smile from ear to ear.
    2) Foundationless -- its like winning the lottery, when the they pull lemon yellow comb overnight without screw ups.
    3) RiteCell -- snapped into wood frames and hoping for the best.
    4) Pierco/Acorn one piece plastic. -- like winning a penny ante slot in a crooked Casino in some fake Rancheria when you get a comb that is not all wings and flaps and glued solid to its neighbor.
    5) Dead Last -- the notorious PF-126 4.9 one piece. -- what a disaster -- all the disadvantages of Pierco, in a cell size the bees won't pull until desperate, in a flimsy frame that warps if you attempt to spread warm wax on it. The ears are short, and will fall off the frame rabbet long before any other frame. I've had those PF-126 in brood boxes for 3 years solid, and they still haven't been pulled out. And its default color is this indescribable off-tint of greenish mustard. Just pulling them out of a box make me want to vomit.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Dutchtown,Louisiana,USA
    Posts
    406

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    I've got Dadant waxed plastic brood cell and without extra wax it aint worth a flip , with extra it's not so bad so far. Actually no, I dont know what bad foundationless looks like, yet. :-)
    Last edited by dtrooster; 07-20-2016 at 08:33 PM.

  14. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    6,034

    Default Re: Move to foundationless?

    Foundationless:


    Nothing really wrong with this other than they'll likely never connect it to the frame around the edges or bottom until I make another manipulation and smash some wax in there (you can see where I did this in a couple places). Then they seem to give it a shot. I'm bored with tricking bees into making foundationless more stable. Also a hugely fat honey band. Another lovely byproduct of foundationless frames. This happens at least three times as often with my foundationless than it does with foundation. I don't have an answer as to why. But they just don't seem to draw foundation out too deep.

    New plastic foundation this spring:


    And for those keeping score at home... a 4.9mm Mann Lake plastic frame. An absolute horrible piece of rubbish that bees sometimes utilize and other times treat as a follower board:


    They warp when you look at them funny and for every one frame like this there's one that's half drawn/half rejected and one in the garage that's been in a junk box after having about five failed attempts at drawing.
    Last edited by jwcarlson; 07-21-2016 at 12:15 AM.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •