Requeening using cells
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    North Okanagan BC Canada
    Posts
    275

    Default Requeening using cells

    I would like to requeen about a dozen of my hives that have older queens. Most are in single deeps with excluders and supers on. I have read much on the idea of just putting the finished queen cell in the hive let it hatch and let nature take its course. This seems a simpler and less time and effort needed method of requeening.
    It also sounds too easy...... What am I missing here. I would be buying queen cells so I assume they are a week or so old. I have read various opinions.
    Any one who has done this your input would be very valuable.
    thanks

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    cool ridge, wv, USA
    Posts
    195

    Default Re: Requeening using cells

    Remember that not all queens cells will have a queen emerge and not all emerged virgin queens will successfully mate and return to the hive and start laying

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Rib Lake WI
    Posts
    1,737

    Default Re: Requeening using cells

    Hoping for more answers because I'm planning on doing this with my hive with chalk brood .

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ridgeville, SC, USA
    Posts
    561

    Default Re: Requeening using cells

    If you want to minimize your risk, you can make some nucs with old.queens.6 or so. Then add cells.to some.hives without removing old.queen. That way if you have some queens,.some brood to use if something doesn't work. Then you will know. You can use nucs as a increase or recombine when the hives are successfully requeened.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    2,643

    Default Re: Requeening using cells

    I prefer laying queens so that the production hives don't go off-line. For that, I use the Laidlaw queen introduction cage.

    If I had a bunch of queen cells, I'd use them to make up mating nuc's, then combine them with the hives to be re-queened a month later, after the mating nuc's showed a solid laying pattern. My idea is aimed at lowest risk.

    Mid-August is the best date for the Northern Hemisphere's beekeepers to give the strongest IPM varroa mite treatment of the year, and some of the treatments are rough on queens. I'd treat the large colonies on August 15th, then combine with the nuc's after that.

    I'd use a mild mite treatment 19 days after making up a nucleus colony - a treatment that won't hurt a queen. That is a unique time to hit the mites - there's no brood. Starts nuc's out mite-free, about right for combining with the large hives later.

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