Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers - Page 3
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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Lake Worth, Florida, USA
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    235

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Around here, honey is around $10 a lb. I have a couple of friends that sell their honey for a dollar an ounce but both of them associate with the holistic/naturlistic crowd. I do however sell cut comb honey for a dollar an ounce and have no problem selling it.
    South Florida, 9 hives, TF, foundation free, slatted racks, bottom entrances, zone 10b

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Grimes County
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    82

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/comp...s/price-fixing

    Price fixing is an agreement (written, verbal, or inferred from conduct) among competitors that raises, lowers, or stabilizes prices or competitive terms. Generally, the antitrust laws require that each company establish prices and other terms on its own, without agreeing with a competitor. When consumers make choices about what products and services to buy, they expect that the price has been determined freely on the basis of supply and demand, not by an agreement among competitors. When competitors agree to restrict competition, the result is often higher prices. Accordingly, price fixing is a major concern of government antitrust enforcement.

    A plain agreement among competitors to fix prices is almost always illegal, whether prices are fixed at a minimum, maximum, or within some range. Illegal price fixing occurs whenever two or more competitors agree to take actions that have the effect of raising, lowering or stabilizing the price of any product or service without any legitimate justification. Price-fixing schemes are often worked out in secret and can be hard to uncover, but an agreement can be discovered from "circumstantial" evidence. For example, if direct competitors have a pattern of unexplained identical contract terms or price behavior together with other factors (such as the lack of legitimate business explanation), unlawful price fixing may be the reason. Invitations to coordinate prices also can raise concerns, as when one competitor announces publicly that it is willing to end a price war if its rival is willing to do the same, and the terms are so specific that competitors may view this as an offer to set prices jointly.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    I'm getting $8 a pound with no balking what so ever. It's selling fast. Regardless of size, $.50 an ounce seems to sell fine. My wild hive honey sold out in 3 days at $10 a lb. Market to it's strengths, there is a demand out there. Given a pint is a pound and a half, I'd price accordingly.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    St. Stephen, N.B. Canada
    Posts
    266

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by usngunr View Post
    I've been selling mine at $8.00 a lb. I had a super off of a wild hive that was dark and thick, I sold that with a description of "wild hive, very limited supply" for $10 a lb and it's sold out already. Frankly I didn't expect for it to sell like that. But my description in the listing must have worked. I've got some nice labels and hang tags coming, we'll see what happens. I've been telling the older guys around here that $15 for a quart is way cheap for real honey. But hey, we charge what we feel it's worth. I got my bees for my honey stock, I'm growing past that. I'll not give it away though. Too many hours sweating in that veil and getting stung.
    Did you get your labels and tags? If so do you like them and would you mind disclosing your purchasing source?
    R2

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Northern Illinois
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    58

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by frogpondwarrior View Post
    Did you get your labels and tags? If so do you like them and would you mind disclosing your purchasing source?
    R2
    Yes, yes I did. I ended up going with our local print shop, they printed up some very nice hang tags that I tie on with some polished jute string. Love them.

    15002377_1898129667076525_6715697960734192540_o.jpg

    Best picture I have right now.


  7. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    34,541

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by BattenkillJB View Post
    I thought this might open a discussion on just what beekeepers are basing their prices on since the price of honey seemed too low at markets.
    Then why didn't you say so?
    Mark Berninghausen

  8. #47
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    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by hivemaker View Post
    I get 6.00 a lb and sell direct to customers. I can't produce enough to justify bottling and sending to market.
    You could raise your price $2.00/ lb and still sell all you make. Then you would be closer to the retail store price and you would make more profit.
    Mark Berninghausen

  9. #48
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    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee's Bees LLC View Post
    I don't sell my honey for any more than I would pay for it. Depending on location we sell for 4-6 bucks a pound
    I can't believe you aren't loosing money doing that. Is that the retail price?
    Mark Berninghausen

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Northern Illinois
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    58

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    I get $8.00 US a pound with absolutely no qualms and I'm sold out in short order.

  11. #50
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by TalonRedding View Post
    Makes me want to raise my prices...
    You should. I sell all of my honey direct store delivery wholesale. My honey is more expensive than any other honey on the grocery store shelf and it moves. Moves just as fast if not faster than the store brand, which is cheaper and often on sale.
    Mark Berninghausen

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Madison, AL, USA
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by BattenkillJB View Post
    Let's bee smart like the Canadians were about Maple Syrup pricing and get a consensus on prices that are sustainable at small marketplaces.
    We shouldn't even go down near supermarket prices for what ever they call honey. So lets start the bidding at $15.00 a pound at retail stand.
    What is your opinion out there? Remember lowering prices for competition is usually a downward spiral for everyone I've seen prices much too low lately.
    I'll take my chances with the free market before I work with people like you! #MakeHoneyGreatAgain!

  13. #52
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    Aug 2016
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    St. Stephen, N.B. Canada
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    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by BattenkillJB View Post
    Let's bee smart like the Canadians were about Maple Syrup pricing and get a consensus on prices that are sustainable at small marketplaces.
    We shouldn't even go down near supermarket prices for what ever they call honey. So lets start the bidding at $15.00 a pound at retail stand.
    What is your opinion out there? Remember lowering prices for competition is usually a downward spiral for everyone I've seen prices much too low lately.
    That is a Quebec thing. We don't have this in New Brunswick.
    On the border near 04619
    Zone 5B @ 29m

  14. #53
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    Aug 2016
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    St. Stephen, N.B. Canada
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    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by frogpondwarrior View Post
    That is a Quebec thing. We don't have this in New Brunswick.
    Actually in Quebec you have to sell your syrup to the marketing board. It is illegal to sell it on your own. They own it and set the price. You certainly don't want this......free market all the way please and thank you!
    On the border near 04619
    Zone 5B @ 29m

  15. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    bedford virginia
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    116

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    off my 1 and only hive I got 1 gallon and 2 splits. sold 10 pounds for 10 dollars a pound at the and kept 4 pounds for my self hoped to do better this year.

  16. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    2,087

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Supply and demand rule. I get very little honey because of our weather, flow, and being surrounded by dry grassland in drought half the time. I don't care if I sell my honey or not, as I get very little. My business model is services rather than honey sales. I charge $10 for 8 oz. they want to buy cheaper, well the feed store honey is higher. and the corn syrup in the grocery store honey section is cheaper. It is up to the consumer.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  17. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Southern NSW Australia
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Interested if the prices people quote they are selling honey for are the price for honey or the price they sell honey packaged.
    Im in Aus and new to bees but did read one post on this forum that made a lot of sense to me.

    Set your price for honey $ lb/kg that you are happy with
    add 3x container cost to get your sale price for packaged honey.

    The 3x container cost covers the container the & labels the consumer is purchasing along with the honey, time to bottle and gives you funds to purchase additional containers.

    With this method you get the same $ lb/kg regardless of the size you sell in. The consumer pays more if they want a premium jar, smaller jar etc. Obviously if they buy in larger containers the consumer would think they are getting a discount on the price per lb/kg but are actually paying the same $ lb/kg you are just passing along the reduced cost to you as a producer in the packaging.

  18. #57
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Well, 220, I don't know what others do, but I sell, by the case, one pound jars of honey, labeled and capped, for $5.00 each in cases of 12. I think a case of empty new glass one pound jars costs me $7.00. Caps about 10 cents each, or $1.20 per dozen, and labels about 15 cents each, 2 labels per jar most cases, or $3.60 per case for labels. So that's $60.00 per case of one pound jars of honey minus $11.80 which equals $48.20. $4.01 per pound for the honey itself, if I did my calculations correctly.

    I never have bought honey not in some sort of container.
    Mark Berninghausen

  19. #58
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    The Garden Centre down the road, which has ten hives, sells their honey for $16 per pound.
    I have never had the guts to charge that much.

    I sell 1lb plastic squeeze jars for $10
    And 12 ounce squeeze bears for $10
    The occasional customer does the (very basic) math , looks at me quizzically and says but I get more honey in the regular jars! Many fall for the cute bears and are happy to pay. Go figure.
    It sells to people who want local raw honey.
    Folks who don't care go to the grocery store and get theirs for $4 a pound.

  20. #59
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    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
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    3,794

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Well, 220, I don't know what others do, but I sell, by the case, one pound jars of honey, labeled and capped, for $5.00 each in cases of 12. I think a case of empty new glass one pound jars costs me $7.00. Caps about 10 cents each, or $1.20 per dozen, and labels about 15 cents each, 2 labels per jar most cases, or $3.60 per case for labels. So that's $60.00 per case of one pound jars of honey minus $11.80 which equals $48.20. $4.01 per pound for the honey itself, if I did my calculations correctly.

    I never have bought honey not in some sort of container.
    So you invest $11.80 in every case of honey you sell. For how long? Do you make money on that investment? If not why not? Do you make any money for the service you provided for there to even be a label a box, a bottle or a cap in the first place. If not why do you work for nothing? I have lot of work for you at that rate by the way. What about the cost you pay to market your honey and make it possible for your customer to find you? What about the time it takes you to deliver that product or be available for it to be picked up? Now you may say that $4 a lb is for your time to keep bees remove honey extract it bottle it. label it purchase bottles labels caps and transport it to your customer. I say you work dirt cheap and don't get a cent for most of what you do. You would not get me to come work for you for that same formula. and you would not borrow my money to purchase your packaging for free either. I don't borrow my own money to do so for free either. My money when invested makes me money. I have bottles that when sold make me more money than the honey that is inside them. I guess you could then consider me a bottle salesman that throws in honey for free. I don't care as long as it sells.
    Everything gets darker, as it goes to where there is less light. Darrel Tank (5PM drawing instructor)

  21. #60
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    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    10,840

    Default Re: Pricing to Cooperate not Compete with Fellow Beekeepers

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    I have bottles that when sold make me more money than the honey that is inside them. I guess you could then consider me a bottle salesman that throws in honey for free.
    One needs to consider the 'scale of the operation' when pricing honey. As I recall, Daniel supports his family with a state government job, not honey sales. Mark (sqkcrk) is producing honey on a larger scale and supporting his family on his beekeeping income.

    I'd say that if Daniel needed to support his family on his beekeeping income its likely that his pricing strategy would be different than his current thinking.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

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