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Thread: Wisconsin

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    12,001

    Default Wisconsin

    Laws pertaining to beekeeping in this state.
    Regards, Barry

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Atkinson, WI, USA
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    22

    Default Re: Wisconsin

    94.76 Honeybee disease and pest control.

    (1) The department shall maintain surveillance of the beekeeping industry for the detection and prevention of honeybee diseases and pests, and may promulgate or issue such rules or orders or adopt such control measures which in its judgment may be necessary to prevent, suppress or control the introduction, spread or dissemination of honeybee diseases and pests in this state.

    (2) In the execution of its functions under this section, the department and its authorized agents shall have free access at all reasonable times to all apiaries, buildings, structures, rooms, vehicles or places where honeybees, beehives, beekeeping equipment or appliances, or honeybee products may be kept or stored, or in which they may be transported, and may open any package or container believed to contain honeybees, honeycombs, honeybee products, beekeeping equipment or appliances or any other materials capable of transmitting honeybee diseases or harboring pests, and obtain inspectional samples from such products or materials for further testing, examination or analysis.

    (3) Honeybees shall be kept in movable frame hives. No person shall knowingly store, hold or expose honeybee products, beehives or any other beekeeping equipment or appliances in a manner which may contribute to the spread or dissemination of honeybee diseases or pests.

    (4) No person may bring or cause to be brought into this state any honeybee, beehive, drawn comb or used beekeeping equipment or appliances without reporting the shipment to the department. Reports shall be made on forms furnished by the department which shall include the name and address of the consignor, name and address of the consignee, date and manner of shipment, and any further information that the department requires. All reports shall be accompanied by a certificate from an official inspector certifying that the materials have been inspected as required by the department by rule and are apparently free from honeybee diseases or pests.

    (5) The department shall charge fees sufficient to cover the reasonable cost of inspections made at the request of any beekeeper to enable the interstate movement of beekeeping equipment or appliances, or honeybees or their products, and may bring an action for the payment thereof including reasonable costs of collection. History: 1975 c. 39; 1993 a. 216; 1995 a. 307.

    94.761 Beekeepers, etc.; agricultural pursuit. The moving, raising and producing of bees, beeswax, honey and honey products shall be deemed an agricultural pursuit. Any keeper of 50 or more hives of bees who is engaged in the foregoing activities is a farmer and engaged in farming for all statutory purposes.
    --Sherman

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Atkinson, WI, USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Wisconsin

    ATCP 21.13  Honeybees; import controls.

    (1)  Reporting import shipments.

    (a) No person may ship live honeybees or used beekeeping equipment into this state without first reporting the import shipment to the department in writing. A single report may cover 2 or more import shipments made in the same calendar year.

    (b) A report under par. (a) shall include all of the following information for each import shipment covered by the report:

    1. The name and address of the person making the import shipment.

    2. A description of the import shipment. The description shall indicate whether the shipment includes any beehive or used beekeeping equipment, or whether it includes only a queen, a queen and attendant honeybees, or adult honeybees.

    3. The expected date of the import shipment. If 2 or more import shipments are covered by the same report, the report need only include the expected date of the first import shipment.

    4. The name and address of the beekeeping operation from which the import shipment will originate, including the state, county and local address of that operation.

    5. The name and address of the person receiving the import shipment in this state if that person is a wholesale distributor of honeybees or beekeeping equipment.

    6. The original copy of each certificate required in connection with the import shipment under subs. (2) to (4). Each certificate shall be issued by a pest control official in the state of origin, prior to the import shipment date. Each certificate shall be based on an inspection performed by the pest control official within 12 months prior to the import shipment date. A single certificate may cover 2 or more import shipments and may combine certifications under subs. (2) to (4).

    (2) Species certification.

    (a) Except as provided under par. (b), no person may ship into this state any live honeybees or used beekeeping equipment originating from a county or parish in which, according to the National Agricultural Pest Insect Survey published by the United States department of agriculture, undesirable honeybees have been found.
    Note: The National Agricultural Pest Insect Survey (NAPIS), which is published on a regular periodic basis by the United States department of agriculture, identifies counties in which Africanized honeybees and other undesirable honeybees have been found. Recent issues of the National Agricultural Pest Insect Survey are available from the department.

    (b) Paragraph (a) does not apply to either of the following:

    1. Honeybees that a pest control official certifies under par. (c) as being European honeybees.

    2. Used beekeeping equipment that a pest control official certifies as being free of live honeybees.

    (c) A pest control official may use any of the following methods to certify that honeybees are European honeybees:

    1. The Fast Africanized Bee Identification System published by the United States department of agriculture, agricultural research service.
    Note: Copies of the Fast Africanized Bee Identification Systems (FABIS) are on file with the department and the legislative reference bureau. Copies are available at cost from the department.

    2. The Morphometric Method for Identification of Africanized and European Honey Bees Using Large Reference Populations.
    Note: The Morphometric Method for Identification of Africanized and European Honey Bees Using Large Reference Populations is described in Rinderer et al.,"Morphometric identification of Africanized and European honey bees using large reference populations," Apidologie (1993) 24, 569-585. Copies of this article are on file with the department and the legislative reference bureau. Copies are available at cost from the department.

    3. Any other method approved by the department.

    (3) Varroa mite certification.

    (a) No person may ship live honeybees into this state unless those honeybees originate from a colony which a pest control official has certified as being apparently free of Varroa mite infestation.

    (b) A pest control official may certify that honeybee colonies found at any location are apparently free of Varroa mite infestation if the pest control official does any of the following:

    1. Examines at least 20% of those colonies using the ether roll method, and finds fewer than 3 mites per 250 honeybees in each examination. Under the ether roll method, the pest control official shall treat 250 honeybees with ether, and shall count the number of mites accumulated in the sampling jar.

    2. Examines at least 20% of those colonies using the sticky board method, and finds fewer than 200 mites in each examination. Under the sticky board method, the pest control official shall treat a colony with a miticide approved by the federal environmental protection agency, shall collect the mites killed by the miticide during a period of at least 24 hours, and shall count the collected mites.

    3. Examines at least 20% of those colonies using another test approved by the department, and finds that every inspected colony is apparently free of Varroa mite infestation based on a standard specified by the department.

    (c) No person may ship used beekeeping equipment into this state unless a pest control official first certifies that the beekeeping equipment is apparently free of Varroa mite infestation.

    (4) American foulbrood certification.

    (a) No person may ship live honeybees into this state unless those honeybees originate from a colony which a pest control official has certified as being apparently free of American foulbrood.

    (b) A pest control official may certify that colonies found at any location are apparently free of American foulbrood if the pest control official visually examines at least 20% of the colonies at that location, and finds evidence of American foulbrood in fewer than 3% of the colonies examined.

    (c) No person may ship used beekeeping equipment into this state unless a pest control official first certifies that the beekeeping equipment is apparently free of American foulbrood.

    History: Cr. Register, December, 1994, No. 468, eff. 1-1-95.
    --Sherman

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Atkinson, WI, USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Wisconsin

    Check this link for Department of Agriculture info and updates on beekeeping.

    https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/Programs_...gulations.aspx
    --Sherman

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Wisconsin

    Selling Honey in Wisconsin
    ​​Few people may realize that “America’s Dairyland” also produces another sweet delight that is in no way related to dairy—honey.

    The bees stayed busy in Wisconsin producing more than 3.4 million pounds of honey in 2015—making Wisconsin 11th in the nation in honey production. The work of 52,000 colonies of bees statewide amounted to a crop valued at more than $8.4 million.

    Food safety, grading and labeling laws may seem complicated to beekeepers who are hobbyists or just trying to earn a little extra money. Here are answers to some of the most common questions we get. Before you set up your facilities, be sure to contact your local town, village, or city and county governments to find out if there are local ordinances you need to meet to process and/or sell your honey. Farmer’s markets may have their own rules, too.

    What kind of license do I need?
    You don’t need a license if:
    You extract, package and sell only your own honey from your own bees, and

    You don’t process the honey or you process it only minimally by straining, heating, and/or making spun or creamed honey using starters from your own honey, and

    You sell your products directly to your customers out of your home, over the internet, or from a farmer’s market. This includes commercial customers using your honey as an ingredient, such as a brewery.

    Even if you don’t need a license, you do need to follow the other regulations discussed here.

    You need a retail license if:
    You gather honey from others for bottling, packaging or processing, or
    You process your own or others’ honey by adding color, flavors or other ingredients, and
    You sell less than 25 percent of your products wholesale (to distributors rather than directly to customers).
    You need a food processor license if:
    You gather honey from others for bottling, packaging or processing, or
    You process your own or others’ honey by adding color, flavors or other ingredients, and
    You sell 25 percent or more of your products wholesale (to distributors rather than directly to customers).
    What kind of facilit​ies and equipment do I need?
    Whether or not you require a license, if you’re going to sell your honey, you must have a separate room dedicated to your food business with commercial-grade equipment. This means you can’t extract, process, or bottle your honey in the same kitchen where you cook your family meals, or in any room that’s part of your normal living space. Because honey is not a potentially hazardous food, we’re not looking for operating-room sterility, but you do need to have equipment in good repair and maintain good sanitation in the place where you handle honey. Some specifics:

    This room must have washable floors, walls, and ceilings.
    You must have adequate light to see well enough to keep things sanitary.
    The room must be properly ventilated to prevent steam and condensation and to keep exhaust air from blowing onto the honey.
    All the doors and windows must be well-screened so birds, insects and rodents can’t enter.
    You must have a three-compartment sink or NSF-approved dishwasher for washing your equipment and utensils. (NSF is a non-profit, non-government organization that develops standards and certifies products for public health)
    Equipment such as extractors, stoves, sinks, tables, shelving and storage containers must be easily cleanable and in good repair.
    Utensils like pans, bowls, knives and spoons must be smooth, impervious, and easily cleaned. Just about all utensils manufactured these days meet this requirement.
    You must keep your facilities and equipment clean and in good repair.
    Honey that you sell must be in new containers, and if it’s comb honey, in new sections.
    Read the entire rule that covers food processing plants.

    What is grading?
    Grading is not about food safety – it’s about quality. It’s voluntary, but if you do choose to grade your honey, you need to follow these regulations whether or not you are licensed as either a food processor or food retailer.

    You can grade your honey according to Wisconsin standards, U.S. Department of Agriculture standards, or not at all. But if you do, it’s an all-or-nothing proposition. If you sell part of a year’s crop as graded honey, you must sell it all as graded. The only exception is that you can sell ungraded honey from your own premises even if you’ve sold graded honey at a farmer’s market. Grade standards don’t apply if you process your honey by adding flavoring, coloring, or other ingredients, or by creaming or whipping.

    Wisconsin standards are outlined in ATCP 157.

    What are the standards for Wisconsin grades?
    There are two Wisconsin grades for cut comb and chunk honey: Wisconsin Fancy White and Wisconsin No. 1. Comb and extracted honey can also be graded Wisconsin No. 2. The standards for Wisconsin grades are listed briefly below.

    Comb honey – Wisconsin Fancy White must:​​​
    Be under 35 on the Pfund color scale
    Weigh at least 12 oz. net or 13 oz. gross
    Be free of propolis or other stains
    Be firmly attached and not projecting beyond the wood, uniformly colored, evenly capped and entirely sealed except in outside cells.
    Comb honey – Wisconsin No. 1 must:
    Weigh at least 11 oz. net or 12 oz. gross
    Be free from propolis or other stains
    Be firmly attached and not projecting beyond the wood, and entirely sealed except no more than 6 cells on each side in addition to outside cells
    Have no more than slight travel stain and surface irregularity, with no more than 10 cells on each side with honey that’s a different color than the one listed on the label
    Comb honey – Wisconsin No. 2:
    is good quality comb that falls below the standards for Fancy White or No. 1.
    Cut comb honey – Wisconsin Fancy White must:
    ​Be cut to uniform size
    Be free of open cells, weeping or bruised surface or wet edges
    Be wrapped in transparent material to prevent leakage and packed in a container (which can be open at the top)
    Meet all other requirements of Wisconsin Fancy White comb honey except weight
    Cut comb honey – Wisconsin No. 1 must:
    ​Meet all the requirements for Wisconsin Fancy White cut comb honey
    Meet all the requirements except weight for Wisconsin No. 1 comb honey
    Extracted honey – Wisconsin Fancy White must:
    ​Weigh at least 11 lbs. 12 oz. per gallon at 68 degrees F.
    Be clean, clear with no air bubbles and other substances in suspension, and free of honeydew, foreign odors and flavors
    Heat-treated to prevent fermentation and delay crystallization
    Extracted honey – Wisconsin No. 1 must:
    ​Weigh at least 11 lbs. 10 oz. per gallon at 68 degrees F.
    Be clean, clear with no air bubbles and other substances in suspension, and free of honeydew, foreign odors and flavors
    Extracted honey – Wisconsin No. 2 must
    ​Weight at least 11 lbs. 8 oz. per gallon at 68 degrees F.
    Be fairly clean, but may contain a few air bubbles or edible substances in suspension
    Have flavor or odor unaffected or only slightly affected by overheating or other means.
    Chunk Honey – Wisconsin Fancy White must:
    ​Contain Wisconsin Fancy White comb honey and Wisconsin Fancy White extracted honey
    Contain half its net weight in comb honey that is in one or two pieces, with no broken pieces
    Chunk honey – Wisconsin No. 1 must:
    ​Contain Wisconsin No. 1 comb honey and Wisconsin No. 1 extracted honey
    Contain half its net weight in comb honey that is in one or two pieces, with no broken pieces
    Find out more about USDA standards for comb honey or extracted honey.

    What does my label need to say?
    Your label needs to include:

    ​Your name or your business name and address, including city, state, and ZIP code. You don’t need a street address as long as it’s available in the local phone directory.
    Net weight of contents (contents only, not the container). For honey that you package uniformly, you need to list the weight in pounds/ounces and in metric measure. For products packaged in random weights, like comb honey, you can list the weight in either pounds/ounces or metric measure.
    Grade, including the word “Ungraded” if that applies
    Color of honey if it is Wisconsin No. 1
    Ingredients if you have added anything
    You can label your honey by predominant flavor or main source if people in the business could clearly distinguish the flavor or source. You can’t name more than one flavor or source, or name the honey by season.​
    Help is here to never misplace that hive tool again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvwlSiOzgOU

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