Ventilation on a nuc
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Douglassville Pa
    Posts
    175

    Default Ventilation on a nuc

    How do you all vent the top of your nuc's

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: Ventilation on a nuc

    Do you mean in the wintertime? If so I custom built a quilt box for mine and checked on it last week. It seems to be doing a good job of dispersing the water vapor from the colony safely to the outside w/o causing condensation inside.
    I notice a little mold growing on the inner cover on top of the box but it was limited in size and was easily scrapped off.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,536

    Default Re: Ventilation on a nuc

    As they are being prepped for winter I give them an upper entrance (plugged or screened until after the robbing season has really stopped). By now they are using the upper entrance in the feeding rim almost exclusively, except for hauling out the corpses which they only do on warmish days from the (much reduced) lower entrances. There is a 1" diameter hole in the feeding rim which I cover with a piece of cardboard with a fingertip-sized hole. I let the bees gnaw it open as much as they want to as the winter progresses. I use a separate cardboard wind baffle in front of it. I use a quilt box on every stack and tonight (temps just below freezing) when I checked on them I could see moisture venting out of all of them.

    In the spring I observe the colonies: some will stay completely devoted to their upper entrance. Others will gradually switch back down to the bottom one. Either way, I oblige them by adjusting the openings to favor whichever one they favor - or leave both of them open if they are doing a good job of guarding them. (I watch from inside the hive to see how that goes.) I usually run with robbing screens for most of the year, anyway, as I have a lot of feral colonies nearby; I protect the upper entrances of all my colonies with nuc-style robbing screens and displaced, semi-concealed entrances.

    My "nucs", BTW are in normal 10-frame deep boxes with internal insulation and follower boards to reduce the space inside to a five-frame width. I'm too lazy to bother with separate equipment for nucs - as they grow out in the spring I just remove successive layers of the insulation to allow for horizontal expansion. They winter in a 5+5+5, plus a 5 medium stack. Next year they, like all my colonies, are going to be just three deeps high. I will decide if I want to make then six frames wide, or just go with triple fives, depending on how big they are. (I have also run deep 4+4+4 +4 mediums with success.) Either way, on top of the boxes is a winter feeding shim (with upper entrance as described above), QB, vent shim and insulated top - no inner cover.

    Enj.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    syracuse n.y.
    Posts
    5,284

    Default Re: Ventilation on a nuc

    popsicle sticks
    mike syracuse ny
    Whatever you subsidize you get more of. Ronald Reagan

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: Ventilation on a nuc

    I use a Vivaldi box. A Vivaldi box is similar to an inner cover, but with 4 sides that are 2-3" tall and screened vents on the front and back. I place some sugar bricks around the hole in the middle for some added food, a 2" high screen over top of that to keep the bees enclosed around the hole and overlay a layer of burlap to absorb moisture and keep out the draft. Spreading the burlap across the top of the screen increases its exposure to hive air for moisture absorbtion versus putting it right over the hole.

    Jim.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bell County, KY, USA
    Posts
    590

    Default Re: Ventilation on a nuc

    Rear ventilation

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Derry, New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,295

    Default Re: Ventilation on a nuc

    I made quilt boxes with wood shavings. 3 of my nucs appeared to have no moisture and the shavings were not moist and hard sugar was still hard. the 4th one however the sugar was mush and the quilt box was dry. the holes on the sides have a 2 inch clearance but the other hives are making a windbreak. wondering if this is why this hive in particular was wet. and yes the entrance was clear. I also drill a 1/2 hole at the bottom of my quilt boxes for a top entrance.

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