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  1. #261
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    Default Re: Washington

    -29C. It’s 2C here and already cold enough for me!

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  3. #262
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    Default Re: Washington

    We had a week of severe cold (for Zone 8) and snow, followed by another week of cold and snow/rain. Winter cherries lost their flowers and bulb plants were buried in the snow. The bees did not go foraging.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •2/4 - 2/17/19

    •New blooms

    •Birch (Betula): airborne birch pollen was first reported in late January by pollen.com (https://www.pollen.com), which probably came from the native paper birch (B. papyrifera). Today I saw some catkins of European white birch (B. pendula, a common landscaping tree) producing yellowish pollen. Both are medium-sized deciduous trees with white, peeling/cracking barks and male catkins in groups of 2 - 3.
    [Birch & honey bee] https://backyardhive.wordpress.com/2...trees-of-eldo/

    •Red-flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum): a deciduous native shrub starting to show clusters of rosy pink, 5-petal flowers. Palmately lobed leaves will emerge soon. The majority planted in my neighborhood including ones with white flowers are probably some cultivars.
    [Red-flowering currant & honey bee] http://fernwoodsy.com/2011/05/hungry...ering-currant/
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  4. #263
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    Default Re: Washington

    The bees had a few, sunny 45F+ afternoons and brought back small amounts of pollen (crocus and snowdrop), after ~4 weeks of interruption. This past February was the coldest in 28 years and the snowiest in 50 years.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •2/18 - 3/3/19

    [Honey bees on hardy cyclamen and winter aconite]
    Cyclamen.jpgWinteraconite.jpg

    •Red alder (Alnus rubra): a very common medium-sized deciduous tree, usually taller than a utility pole but not twice as tall. It has small, pine-cone like fruits from last year’s female flowers and reddish male catkins (~4” long) in bundles of 3+, some of which began releasing yellowish pollen. This native tree may be one of the first major pollen sources in non-urban areas. Airborne alder pollen was first reported on 2/16 by pollen.com.
    [Alder (probably grey alder) & honey bee] https://mudsongs.org/honey-bee-friendly-flower-unknown/

    •Winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis): a small bulb (actually a tuber) plant with yellow flowers.
    [Winter aconite & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shni-T86GcI
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  5. #264
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    Default Re: Washington

    In the past week, the bees mostly worked at the pollen-sub feeder near the hives, but also brought in some real pollen from crocus, osoberry, pieris and camellia.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •3/4 - 3/10/19
    [A yellow-faced bumble bee queen came out of hibernation and foraged on early crocus flowers. Small populations of orange-rumped bumble bees that were active in December-January did not make it through February.]
    yellowfacebumbe.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Elm (Ulmus): American elm (U. americana, not native here) is a medium-sized deciduous tree with small, purple-brown flowers. I think it is blooming on high branches. Airborne elm pollen was first reported on 2/22 by pollen.com. Chinese elm (U. parvifolia) will bloom in September.
    [English elm & honey bee] http://www.florabeilles.org/serie/ul...apis-mellifera

    •Red maple (Acer rubrum): not native but it is one of the most common street trees in my neighborhood. Stamens are emerging from clusters of red buds on bare branches. Like closely related silver maple which started before the cold spell, male and female flowers may occur on the same tree or on different trees. The one I saw blooming might be Freeman maple (red x silver hybrid, A. x freemanii).
    [Red maple & honey bee] https://bugguide.net/node/view/375647
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  6. #265
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    Default Re: Washington

    Many plants began to bloom, delayed by 1 - 3 weeks compared with last year. Some early bloomers that were hit hard by the cold weather in February are still several weeks overdue. The bees had ~60F afternoons over the weekend and no longer took pollen-sub; their favorite pollen species were plum, osoberry and willow but they also brought in hazelnut, pieris, crocus, camellia, heath, viburnum, and dandelion.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •3/11 - 3/17/19

    [Honey bees on Cornelian cherry and Dutch crocus]
    Cornelian1.jpgDutchcrocus.jpg
    [A drone fly (hover fly) and a bumble bee queen emerged from hibernation]
    dronefly.jpgBumblecrocus.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Common camellia (Camellia japonica): an evergreen ornamental shrub or a small tree, typically larger than fall-blooming sasanqua camellia (C. sasanqua), but there are many varieties and hybrids with intermediate sizes and blooming times.
    [Camellia & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nWSF6S4uTc

    •Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale): I found dandelion pollen in my hives for the first time since mid November. The flowers can usually be found throughout winter (not this past February though), as long as they are not covered by snow and get plenty of sunshine.
    [Dandelion & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Io2PDoF-zOk

    •Flowering plum, cherry plum or myrobalan plum (Prunus cerasifera): a large deciduous shrub or a small tree, which may produce cherry-sized edible fruits in summer. Some varieties have white, five-petal flowers and green leaves (leaves emerge later), and others such as ‘Thundercloud’ and ‘Newport’ have pink flowers and red-purple leaves. Many escaped plants, mostly with white flowers and green leaves, are also found in my neighborhood. Common plum (P. domestica) will start later, probably in a few weeks. Plums may be confused with cherries, but they do not have a small notch at each petal tip nor horizontal lines on young barks.
    [Flowering plum & honey bee] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wikiFi...1_25042009.jpg

    •Grape hyacinth (Muscari): a small bulb plant with many urn-shaped flowers.
    [Grape hyacinth & honey bee] https://gardenwalkgardentalk.com/201...slike-muscari/

    •Purple deadnettle (Lamium purpureum): a common weed with pink-purple, two-lipped tubular flowers, opposite leaves, and square stems. Can be mistaken for henbit (L. amplexicaule).
    [Purple deadnettle & honey bee] https://honeybeesuite.com/honey-bee-...ed-deadnettle/

    •Pussy willows (Salix spp.): some species of early-blooming willows are called pussy willows, because their furry, silver-grey flower buds look like tiny cats. Yellowish catkins loaded with pollen are emerging on male plants. Our native pussy willow, Scouler’s willow (S. scouleriana) is a large shrub or a small tree, found in relatively dry places, while another native Sitka willow (S. sitchensis, will bloom soon) tend to grow by water. Ornamental pussy willows, probably cultivars of goat willow (S. caprea) or American pussy willow (S. discolor, not native here), are also blooming.
    [Pussy willow & honey bee] https://solarbeez.com/tag/pussy-willow-tree-in-bloom/

    •Siberian squill (Scilla siberica): a small bulb plant, looking like a modest hyacinth.
    [Siberian squill & honey bee] https://honeybeesuite.com/honey-bee-...berian-squill/
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  7. #266
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    Default Re: Washington

    In the past week, we had a few unseasonably warm days (>75F) followed by cooler, but still warm enough days for the bees to bring in lots of pollen. About half were dark-orange or brownish pollen of cherry/plum, probably flowering plums that came to full-bloom. The other half included willow, osoberry, red/silver maple, dandelion, Cornelian cherry, camellia, pieris and deadnettle.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •3/18 - 3/24/19

    [Honey bees on hyacinth and flowering plum]
    Hyacinthwhite.jpgcherryplum.jpg

    •A long list of new blooms

    •Azaleas and rhododendrons (Rhododendron): I saw some early bloomers, such as Korean rhododendron (R. mucronulatum), a deciduous shrub with pink flowers (no leaves yet), and Bric-a-brac rhododendron (R. 'Bric-a-brac’) with white flowers and evergreen leaves.
    [Azalea & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/380629792/

    •Deciduous magnolias (Magnolia spp.): star magnolias (M. stellata, M. kobus and their hybrids), dwarf trees with white, star-shaped flowers, were the first to bloom, followed by larger trees with pinkish flowers (Magnolia x soulangeana and etc). Evergreen magnolia species will bloom later.
    [Star magnolia & honey bee] http://bees.msu.edu/magnolia/

    •Flowering pear or Callery pear (Pyrus calleryana): a fairly common street tree. White, five-petal flowers and green leaves are emerging. Pears and apples have several styles (the stalk structure of female flower parts) in each flower, unlike cherries, plums, or apricots, which have only one. Fruiting pears, such as common pear (P. communis) and Asian pear (P. pyrifolia) will bloom later.
    [Pear & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/awsheffield/16511063870

    •Flowering quince (Chaenomeles): a deciduous ornamental shrub with red (maybe pink or or white), 5-petal flowers on spiny twigs. Some shrubs began to bloom in late January then were hit hard by the cold weather in February.
    [Flowering quince & honey bee] http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/?blogt...logasset=45538

    •Forsythia (Forsythia): a deciduous ornamental shrub with bright yellow, four-lobed flowers on arching branches.
    [Forsythia & honey bee] http://www.florabeilles.org/serie/fo...apis-mellifera

    •Glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa): a small bulb plant with bluish, upward facing, six-petaled flowers.
    [Glory-of-the-snow & honey bee] http://www.beetography.com/Honey-Bee...5_jsVMRBx.html

    •Grecian windflower (Anemone blanda): a small perennial often grown with small spring bulb plants, with blue or white, daisy-like flowers.
    [Grecian windflower & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/32666804063

    •Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis)
    [Hyacinth & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0Q9tlior3E

    •Japanese flowering apricot (Prunus mume): a small deciduous ornamental tree with white or pink or reddish, five-petal (maybe double) flowers, which appear to be attached directly to the branch with little stem (versus cherries and plums that have visible stems).
    [Japanese apricot & honey bee] https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/pos...m?postnum=9154

    •Mustards (Brassica spp.); I saw yellow flowers in my neighbors’ veggie gardens, probably over-wintered Brassica plants, such as kale, collard, and mustard green.
    [Kale & honey bee] https://twitter.com/Apiaries_8/statu...53505513697280

    •Ornamental cherries (Prunus spp.): fall- and winter-blooming higan cherry varieties (P. x subhirtella) once lost their flowers in the cold weather of February, but bloomed again to some extent. Dwarf weeping cherries with white flowers (P. x snofozam ‘Snow fountain’ or similar varieties) just began to bloom, about on time. Various ornamental cherries (P. serrulata, P. x yedoensis and etc) will bloom from now on until late April, but some double-flowered varieties with too many petals do not seem to attract bees.
    [Ornamental cherry & honey bee] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F..._cherry_02.jpg

    •Poplar (Populus): airborne poplar pollen was first reported on 3/15 by pollen.com, which probably came from black cottonwood, and now I can see catkins on male poplar trees. Black cottonwood (P. trichocarpa) is a very common native tree and the tallest among deciduous trees (shorter than large evergreen conifers). Quaking aspen (P. tremuloides, maybe native in some areas) has grayish-white barks, and in summer, its leaves tremble in breeze. Lombardy poplar (P. nigra) is slender and often planted in a row for windbreak. Many escaped trees of white poplar (P. alba) are also found in my neighborhood. Unrelated tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera, related to magnolias) will bloom in June.
    [Aspen & honey bee] http://www.florabeilles.org/terme/populus-tremula-0

    •Western skunk cabbage (Lysichiton americanus): a native bog plant with a flower stalk surrounded by a showy yellow bract.
    [Western skunk cabbage & honey bee] https://honeybeesuite.com/honey-whats-that-smell/
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  8. #267
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    Lake Forest Park, WA
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    Default Re: Washington

    Bigleaf maple trees began to bloom at sunny locations. Norway maples had started several days earlier. Sitka willows and camellias came to full bloom, flowering pears are nearing full bloom, ornamental cherries are at various blooming stages, flowering plums and osoberries are fading, and red maples are done. The bees are raising drones in burr combs.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •3/25 - 3/31/19

    [Honey bees on camellia, sweet osmanthus, grape hyacinth, and flowering currant]
    Camellia.jpgsweetosmanthus.jpgMuscari.jpgcurrant.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum): one of the most common trees of the Pacific Northwest and our first major nectar source (weather permitting). It is a large deciduous tree, typically 40 - 80’ tall (up to 150’), with hanging clusters of greenish-yellow flowers. Its leaves (not emerged yet) are the largest of all maples, 6 - 12” across.
    [Big-leaf maple & honey bee] https://www.ecobeneficial.com/2013/0...rubs-for-bees/

    •Boxwood (Buxus): several species and hybrids are commonly used as evergreen hedge plants. They have small, creamy-yellow flowers and shiny, oppositely arranged leaves.
    [Boxwood & honey bee] https://honeybeesuite.com/an-act-of-...ee-on-boxwood/

    •Green alkanet (Pentaglottis sempervirens): an evergreen weed, 2’-3’ tall, with blue, 5-petal flowers and hairy leaves, often found in moist, shady places.
    [Green alkanet & honey bee, the 4th and 5th photos] https://www.buzzaboutbees.net/Bees-L...n-Alkanet.html

    •Norway maple (Acer platanoides): a medium to large sized tree, often planted along large streets. Some escapes are also found in my neighborhood. Clusters of green-yellow flowers are more upright compared with those of bigleaf maples. The ones I saw might be ‘Norwegian sunset’ maples (A. truncatum x platanoides).
    [Norway maple & honey bee, the 18 th image labeled as “Biene auf Spitzahorn”] http://www.imkerei-zocher.de/bienenweide/

    •Salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis): a native deciduous shrub, several feet tall, with woody stems covered with fine prickles. Pink, five petal flowers are emerging.
    [Salmon berry & honey bee] https://honeybeesuite.com/native-bee...e-salmonberry/

    •Spanish bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica) a weedy bulb plant with blue (sometimes pink or white) bell-shaped flowers on upright stems.
    [Spanish bluebell & honey bee] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...ollination.jpg

    •Sweet osmanthus or tea olive (Osmanthus fragrans): an evergreen ornamental shrub with oppositely arranged leaves and small, white, four-lobed flowers which are very fragrant.
    [Sweet osmanthus & honey bee] see above.

    •Trillium (Trillium): Western trillium (T. ovatum) is a common wildflower with 3-petal white flowers, but those I saw grown in gardens might be some cultivars.
    [Trillium & honey bee, the 4th photo] http://honeypiehivesherbals.blogspot.com/2012/05/?m=0

    •Tulip (Tulipa)
    [Tulip & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEfjIu7KDAc

    •Wintergreen barberry (Berberis julianae): one of evergreen barberries with yellow flowers, thorny branches, and spiny leaves oppositely arranged. Warty barberry (B. verruculosa, evergreen) and red barberry (B. thunbergii, deciduous) will bloom later. They are common hedge plants.
    [Wintergreen barberry & honey bee] https://www.die-honigmacher.de/kurs2/pflanze_19.html
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  9. #268
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    Default Re: Washington

    Maples and cherries are blooming everywhere. It did rain in the past week but the bees had good foraging opportunities for this time of the year. Popular pollens were maple (~40%) and cherry/plum (may contain pear, ~40%). The rest included camellia, willow, hyacinth/bluebell, and dandelion.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •4/1 - 4/7/19

    [A honey bee on an ornamental cherry flower]
    cherry.jpg

    •Common plum (Prunus domestica): a small deciduous tree with white, 5-petaled flowers and green leaves.
    [Common plum & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/bienenwabe/33152624274/

    •Forget-me-not (Myosotis): a common weed with small, blue, 5-petaled flowers, often found in moist, shady places.
    [Forget-me-not & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZES28yfEqvo

    •Northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum): my ‘Pink lemonade’ began to bloom. ’Spartan’ and ‘Jersey’ will follow.
    [Blueberry & honey bee] https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/invest...sh_blueberries

    •Ornamental maples (Acer spp.): some non-native maples are commonly used in landscaping. I saw box elder (A. negundo) and sugar maple (A. saccharum) in bloom.
    [Box elder & honey bee] http://rosecombapiaries.com/2015/03/...ndo-box-elder/

    •Redbud (Cercis): a small tree of the pea/bean family, not native here but grown as ornamental. Deep pink flowers are emerging on bare twigs.
    [Redbud & honey bee] https://www.istockphoto.com/video/sl...0356-276996291

    •Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius): a wooly shrub, 3’-5’ tall, often seen along freeways, with bright yellow flowers which later become pea pods.
    [Scotch broom & honey bee] https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/3...sh-pollination

    •Serviceberry or shadbush (Amelanchier): a deciduous shrub or a small tree, with flowers that have five, white, slender petals. Some ornamental varieties began to show flowers and leaves. The native Saskatoon serviceberry (A. alnifolia) will bloom soon.
    [Serviceberry & honey bee] http://www.ourhabitatgarden.org/crea...od-spring.html

    •Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) or sweet cherry (P. avium): deciduous trees with white, 5-petaled flowers and green leaves. Each flower petal has a notch at the tip and the barks show horizontal lines. Similar looking escaped plants are commonly found in my neighborhood.
    [Sweet cherry & honey bee] https://garden.org/plants/photo/85083/

    •Vine maple (Acer circinatum): a native maple, starting to show clusters of small flowers, dark reddish outside, greenish yellow inside. It is often found in the understory of forests as a large shrub or a small tree, and also used for landscaping.
    [Vine maple & honey bee] https://honeybeesuite.com/honey-bee-forage-vine-maple/

    •Weeping willow (Salix babylonica or its hybrid): a common ornamental tree with gray-black bark and weeping branches, showing numerous catkins along with young leaves.
    [Weeping willow and honey bee] https://wadesbees.wordpress.com/cate...ollen-sources/
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  10. #269
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    Default Re: Washington

    Both bigleaf and vine maples are in bloom. The bees went foraging between frequent showers but did not get much, judged by hive weight.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •4/8 - 4/14/19

    •Apple (Malus): flowering crabapples (Malus species and hybrids selected for blossoms) are small trees with white, pink, or reddish flowers and green or purple leaves. The orchard apple (M. pumila) has 5-petaled, white flowers tinged with pink. Apple blossoms may be confused with pear blossoms (how to tell apples from pears, http://drmgoeswild.com/malus-pyrus-prunus/).
    [Apple & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6050631207

    •Cherry laurel or English laurel (Prunus laurocerasus): a common evergreen hedge plant with large, glossy, alternate leaves and showy upright clusters of small, white, 5-petaled, and fragrant flowers. Highly invasive and often found in woodlands. I have occasionally found honey bees on a dwarf variety, when it bloomed again in late summer. Another common cherry laurel, Portuguese laurel (P. lusitanica) will bloom later.
    [Cherry laurel & honey bee] http://www.florabeilles.org/serie/pr...is-mellifera-2

    •Dogwoods (Cornus spp); flowering dogwood (C. florida) is a small deciduous ornamental tree, often wider than it is tall, and somewhat flat-topped. Each cluster of small flowers are surrounded by four showy bracts (look like petals), which may be white, pink or reddish. The native Pacific dogwood (C. nuttallii) is often taller than it is wide, and its flowers are surrounded by six white bracts.
    [Dogwood & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8296634017

    •Fruiting pears (Pyrus spp.); flowering pears are fading, but fruiting pears, such as common pear (P. communis) and Asian pear (P. pyrifolia) began to bloom.
    [Pear & honey bee, the 3 rd photo] http://beeaware.org.au/pollination/p.../apples-pears/

    •Huckleberries (Vaccinium spp); evergreen huckleberry (V. ovatum) is a native shrub, also used in landscaping, with boxwood-like leaves (but alternately arranged) and clusters of small, pinkish-white, urn-shaped flowers. Red huckleberry (V. parvifolium) is a deciduous native shrub found in woodlands, with pinkish, urn-shaped flowers.
    [Huckleberries and honey bees] http://www.beeculture.com/huckleberries-vaccinium/

    •Japanese maple (Acer palmatum): one of the most common ornamental trees in my neighborhood. Many cultivars are dwarf.
    [Japanese maple & honey bee] https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/pos...m?postnum=9650

    •Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii): a native evergreen tree with showy orange-red bark and clusters of small, white, urn-shaped flowers.
    [Pollinators on madrone flowers. I could not find photos/videos with honey bees. I do not know whether they like it.]: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHvapNExMho

    •Pacific willow (Salix lasiandra, aka Salix lucida var. lasiandra): the last willow to bloom in my neighborhood. It is a large shrub or a small to medium sized tree, often found in wet places, with lance-shaped, shiny leaves. Yellow male catkins are loaded with pollen.
    [Pacific willow. I could not find a good photo with honey bees but they like it] https://www.beavertonoregon.gov/2021/Pacific-Willow

    •Red elderberry (Sambucus racemosa): a deciduous native shrub or a small tree, found in moist places, with upright clusters of small white flowers and ash-like compound leaves (not fully emerged yet).
    [Red elder & honey bee] http://www.florabeilles.org/terme/sambucus-racemosa-0
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  11. #270
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    Default Re: Washington

    It was not too rainy during the past week and the bees were able to put some nectar in the honey super, gaining up to 5 lb per day. Drones began to fly.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •4/15 - 4/21/19

    [Honey bees on sour cherry, green alkanet, candytuft (uncommon), and bigleaf maple (yes, that tiny speck is a honey bee)]
    Sourcherry.jpgAlkanet.jpgCandytuft.jpgBigleafmaple.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Bitter cherry or Oregon cherry (Prunus emarginata): a common, native cherry shrub/tree with flat-topped clusters of 5 - 12 white or pinkish flowers. The bark is reddish brown with horizontal lines.
    [Bitter cherry & honey bee] http://science.halleyhosting.com/nat...nus/bitter.htm

    •Chokecherry or bitter cherry (Prunus virginiana): a native cherry shrub/tree with 3 - 4” long clusters of small white flowers. I have only found a few nearby but it is supposed to be pretty common.
    [Chokecherry & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrTkgVcC3C0

    •California lilac, blue blossom or ceanothus (Ceanothus): an evergreen ornamental shrub with small, bright blue flowers and dark green leaves. I saw a creeping garden variety in bloom. Tall shrubs bloom a bit later. Not related to the lilac (Syringa, not popular with honey bees), which also began to bloom.
    [Ceanothus & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPGBtQXUjj4

    •Horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum): a medium to large-sized tree with upright clusters of white flowers and palmately compound leaves with seven leaflets. Many escapes are found in my neighborhood. Red horse chestnut (A × carnea) has red-purple flowers.
    [Horse-chestnut & honey bee] https://www.flickr.com/photos/bienenwabe/13983618827

    •Mexican orange (Choisya ternata): an evergreen hedge plant with glossy, aromatic, compound leaves with three leaflets. Clusters of white flowers with 5-7 petals were quite popular with honey bees last year, when they bloomed again in fall. Choisya x dewitteana 'Aztec Pearl' has compound leaves with five narrow leaflets.
    [A honey bee on Mexican orange, November 2018]
    Mexican orange.jpg

    •Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa)
    [Strawberry & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGw-Ely45Ak

    •Vetches (Vicia spp.): sprawling or climbing weeds with pinnately compound leaves ending in tendrils. Flowers are white, pink, or purple and on one-sided spikes.
    [Vetch & honey bee] http://peacebeefarm.blogspot.com/200...-in-bloom.html
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  12. #271
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    Default Re: Washington

    The maple flow is pretty much done, although there still are many flowers in part-shade locations, both bigleaf and vine. No maple honey for me this year. The bees had a good foraging week and brought back a variety of pollen, including apple-like (29%), Pacific willow (25%), bigleaf maple (14%), vine maple (8%), cherry-like (7%), dandelion (3%), and camellia (2%).

    [Honey bees on flowering crabapple, orchard apple, money plant, basket-of-gold, and evergreen huckleberry]
    floweringcrabapple.jpgApple.jpgmoneyplant.jpgbasketofgold.jpgevergbreenhuckle.jpg

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •4/22 - 4/28/19

    •New blooms

    •California poppy (Eschscholzia californica): a common wildflower with orange-yellow, 4-petal flowers.
    [California poppy & honey bee] https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/pos...?postnum=13179

    •Cascara buckthorn or cascara sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana): a native deciduous shrub or a small tree, with alternate, oval, glossy green leaves with prominent veins and clusters of small, greenish-yellow, cup-shaped, and 5-petaled flowers .
    [Italian buckthorn and honey bee (I could not find a Cascara photo but it also attracts honey bees)] http://www.florabeilles.org/serie/rh...is-mellifera-4

    •Golden chain tree (Laburnum anagyroides or its hybrid): a small ornamental tree with trifoliate leaves and hanging clusters of showy yellow flowers.
    [Golden chain tree & honey bee] http://beespoke.info/2016/06/02/bee-flowers-june/

    •Oregon white oak or garry oak (Quercus garryana): a medium sized native tree with deciduous leaves (not fully emerged yet) that have rounded lobes. Male catkins began producing pollen. Other non-native oaks, often planted in parks and along streets, such as English, Italian, Spanish (pin), and northern red (champion), all seem to be in bloom. Honey bees may collect pollen and/or honeydew from oak trees.
    [A honey bee collecting honeydew from an oak leaf] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYswpgljY_w

    •Ornamental maples (Acer spp.): I saw Amur, paperbark, trident, and sycamore maples in bloom on streets in Seattle. Street tree IDs in City of Seattle can be found here (http://web6.seattle.gov/SDOT/StreetTrees/)
    [Sycamore maple & honey bee] http://beespoke.info/2014/01/20/bee-trees-sycamore/

    •Pacific blackberry, dewberry, or trailing blackberry (Rubus ursinus): a native blackberry with 5-petaled white flowers, prickles, and compound leaves that have three leaflets. Larger and more robust Himalayan blackberry bushes (R. armeniacus, one of our major nectar sources) will bloom later.
    [Pacific blackberry & honey bee] http://nativefoodsnursery.com/berrie...ic-blackberry/
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  13. #272
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    The bees had another nice week and visited many different flowers (apple, cherry laurel, holly, bluebell, Pacific willow, horse chestnut, vine maple, dogwood, camellia, dandelion and etc.). Bumble bee workers were seen everywhere and mason bees were busy filling nesting tubes.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •4/29 - 5/5/19

    [Honey bees on vine maple, English cherry laurel, boxleaf honeysuckle, and Pacific willow (yes I need a better camera)]
    Vine maple.jpgCherry laurel.jpgboxleafhoneysuckle.jpgPacificwillow.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Burning bush (Euonymus alatus): a deciduous ornamental shrub, with small 4-petaled flowers and oppositely arranged leaves that turn bright red in fall.
    [Burning bush & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_53G_2zLYPQ

    •Common hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna): a small deciduous tree with thorns, small lobed leaves, and clusters of small, 5-petaled flowers which may be white, pink, or red. Many escaped plants, mostly with white flowers, are found in my neighborhood. Each flower has one style, while closely related English hawthorn (C. laevigata) has more than one.
    [Common hawthorn & honey bee] https://wolveswild.net/bees-on-hawthorn-flowers/

    •Camas (Camassia): a bulb plant which has erect flower stalks with dozens of star-like flowers, usually blue. It is a garden plant in my neighborhood, but great camas (C. leichtlinii) and/or common camas (C. quamash) may be native in some areas.
    [Camas & honey bee] https://beautifuloregon.com/camas-li...on-photography

    •English holly (Ilex aquifolium): a highly invasive evergreen shrub/tree, with shiny, spiny leaves alternately arranged and small, white flowers. Female plants bear bright red (sometimes yellow) fruits in fall, which may still remain.
    [Holly & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_D8XPcrsmIM

    •European mountain-ash or rowan tree (Sorbus aucuparia): a small deciduous tree with ash-like compound leaves and flat-topped clusters of white, 5-petal flowers. Many escapes are found in my neighborhood.
    [Mountain ash & honey bee (the 2 nd photo)] https://blueberrytalk.wordpress.com/.../mountain-ash/

    •Photinia (Photinia): an ornamental shrub or small tree, with evergreen or semi-evergreen leaves alternately arranged, and clusters of small, 5-petal white flowers. Young leaves are reddish, which are very showy with ‘Red-tip photinia’, Photinia × fraseri.
    [Photinia & honey bee] https://beemaster.com/forum/index.php?topic=15623.0

    •Red osier dogwood, red-twig dogwood (Cornus sericea): A native deciduous shrub with red or yellow barks, opposite leaves, and flat-topped clusters of small, white, four-petal flowers. Often found in wetlands and also used for landscaping. It blooms again in mid summer.
    [Red osier dogwood & honey bee, July 2018]
    redosier.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  14. #273
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    It was sunny and the temperatures went up to 80F during the past week. The bees put lots of nectar in honey supers, mostly from hawthorn flowers, I think. Black locust trees began to bloom in very sunny locations, but I am not sure when the flow will start, because it will be quite a bit cooler for a while.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/6 - 5/12/19

    [Honey bees on common hawthorn, cascara buckthorn, horse chestnut, cranberry cotoneaster, and yellow archangel]
    Hawthorn.jpgcascara.jpghorsechestnut.jpgCotoneaster.jpgyellowarchangel.jpg
    Last edited by Kuro; 05-12-2019 at 08:48 PM.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  15. #274
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    (Continued from post#273, since I can only put max 5 photos in one post)

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/6 - 5/12/19

    •New blooms

    •Black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii): a native shrub/tree with thorns, toothed leaves which may be shallowly lobed, and clusters of small, white, 5-petaled flowers with 10 stamens. Closely related Suksdorf black hawthorn (C. suksdorfii) has 20 stamens.
    [Black hawthorn & honey bee] https://www.wildflower.org/gallery/r...id_image=34373

    •Black locust or false acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia): native to the southern U.S, it is considered an invasive species here. It is a tree that can reach 100’, with thorns, pinnately compound leaves, and very showy hanging clusters of white flowers.
    [Black locust & honey bee] http://www.florabeilles.org/serie/ro...apis-mellifera

    •Cat’s ear or false dandelion (Hypochaeris radicata): it may look like a dandelion, but the stems look longer and wiry, and the leaves are hairy. I think honey bees like it better than the true dandelion.
    [Cat’s ear & honey bee] https://curbstonevalley.com/blog/?p=10214

    •Cotoneasters (Cotoneaster spp.): cotoneasters are ornamental shrubs or small trees with white or pinkish 5-petaled flowers and simple alternate leaves (evergreen or deciduous), and bear red berries in fall. I saw lots of bumbles and some honey bees on tiny, pinkish flowers of cranberry cotoneaster (C. apiculatus). Some groundcovers with white flowers (rockspray and bearberry cotoneasters) also began to bloom.
    [Cranberry cotoneaster & honey bee] see post#273

    •Dutch white clover (Trifolium repens): a common lawn weed and one of the few clovers that honey bees like.
    [Dutch white clover & honey bee, June 2018]
    Dutch clover.jpg

    •Rockrose (Cistus): an evergreen ornamental shrub with rose-like 5-petaled flowers, white or pink, which may have a dark red spot at the base of each petal. The leaves are green or silvery green, soft, and oppositely arranged.
    [Cistus & honey bee, June 2018]
    Cistus.jpg

    •Rugosa rose (Rosa rugosa): an imported ‘wild rose’ with dark pink, pink, or white flowers, often used in landscaping. Its pinnately compound leaves are distinctly corrugated compared with other wild roses.
    [Rugosa rose & honey bee, June 2018]
    Rugosa rose.jpg

    •Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus): a native blackberry without prickles. It has white, five-petal flowers and palmately lobed leaves.
    [A honey bee on thimbleberry, the 6th photo] http://www.queenannebees.com/2013/05...erry-flow.html

    •Viburnums (Viburnum spp.): the native viburnum, American cranberry bush (Viburnum opulus var. americanum), started to show clusters of white 5-petal flowers. Several ornamental viburnums are also in bloom, although I have seen honey bees only on species that bloom from late fall to early spring (which are gone now).
    [The European variety of V. opulus & honey bee] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...cence_1874.jpg

    •’Wild’ roses (Rosa spp.): large deciduous shrubs with white or pink, single (five-petal) flowers 2”-3” in diameter, pinnately compound leaves, and thorns. They may be one(s) of our native roses (Nootka or Wood’s), invasive species (dog or sweetbriar) or similar looking single-flowered rose cultivars.
    [Nootka rose & honey bee] https://terrythormin.smugmug.com/Ins...-etc/i-zRhBBVS

    •Bee friendly garden plants (some of them may not attract honey bees until after the blackberry): annual and perennial bachelor’s buttons (Centaurea cyanus and C. montana), beauty bush (Linnaea amabilis), English and creeping thymes (Thymus vulgaris and T. serpyllum), hardy geranium with blue flowers (Geranium ‘Rozanne’ ?), Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis indica, not a true hawthorn), ornamental onions (Allium spp.), raspberry (Rubus sp.), shasta daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum), weigela, wisteria, woodland sage (Salvia nemorosa), and etc.
    [Annual and perennial bachelor’s buttons]
    bachelorsbutton.jpgMountain bluet.jpg
    Last edited by Kuro; 05-12-2019 at 08:49 PM.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  16. #275
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    The high temperatures were 60-70F and the black locust bloom still looked like 10-20%, as of today. I saw numerous flower buds of Himalayan blackberry but no open flowers yet. Common hawthorns faded and honey bees worked on various plants.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/13 - 5/19/19

    [Honey bees on burning bush, Mexican orange, red-osier dogwood, bearberry cotoneaster, and lavalle hawthorn]
    burningbush.jpgMexican orange.jpgredosier.jpgbearberrycotoneaster.jpgLavalleHawthorn.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  17. #276
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    (Continued from post #275)

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/13 - 5/19/19

    •New blooms

    •Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus): a clover-like plant with yellow flowers.
    [Birdsfoot trefoil & honey bee, June 2018]
    Birdsfoot trefoil.jpg

    •Kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa): a small deciduous tree with dark green, oppositely arranged leaves and four, white, and pointed bracts (look like petals) that surround each cluster of small flowers.
    [Kousa dogwood. I could not find a photo with a bee, but my bees brought back its pollen last June] http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.o...empercode=j910

    •English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia): an aromatic evergreen shrub with spikes of small, pinkish-purple flowers. French or Spanish lavender (L. stoechas, started about 10 days earlier) has large bracts on top of each flower spikes.
    [Lavender & honey bee] https://www.honeytraveler.com/single...avender-honey/

    •Lavalle hawthorn or hybrid cockspur hawthorn (Crataegus x lavallei): a fairly common street tree, with dark green, serrated leaves and clusters of 5-petaled white flowers, which later produce orange-red fruits.
    [Lavalle hawthorn & honey bee, see post #275]

    •Pacific ninebark (Physocarpus capitatus): a large native shrub found in moist places, with shredding barks, maple-like leaves, and clusters of small white flowers. The purple leaved cultivar of Eastern ninebark (P. opulifolius ‘Diabolo’) is a fairly common ornamental shrub.
    [Pacific ninebark & honey bee, May 2018]
    Ninebark.jpg

    •Poppy (Papaver): both common poppy (P. rhoeas) and oriental poppy (P. orientale) began to bloom. Welsh poppy (Meconopsis cambrica) started about 10 days earlier.
    [Honey bees collecting dark blue-green and olive colored pollen from common poppies with red and pink flowers, June 2018)]
    Redpoppy.jpgPinkpoppy.jpg

    •Torch lily or red hot poker (Kniphofia): a garden perennial with grass-like leaves and upright spikes of many flowers, red, orange, yellow, or bi-colored.
    [Torch lily & honey bee, June 2018]
    Torch lily.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants: asparagus (Asparagus officinalis), black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa), buckwheat (Fagopyrum), empress tree or princess tree (Paulownia tomentosa, found it past full bloom), mock orange (Philadelphus), spiderwort (Tradescantia), and etc.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  18. #277
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    We had another week of cool weather but the majority of black locust trees are now in bloom and blackberry flowers can be found in sunny locations. Tulip poplars also began to bloom. It will be dry and warm for a while, so we extracted maple/hawthorn (mostly, I think) honey to make a room in honey supers.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/20 - 5/26/19

    [Honey bees on chive, raspberry, scotch broom, sageleaf rockrose, and English thyme]

    chive.jpgraspberry.jpgscotch broom2.jpgCistus.jpgThyme.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  19. #278
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    (Continued from post#277)

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/20 - 5/26/19

    •New blooms

    •Elderberry (Sambucus): blue elderberry (S. cerulea) is a large native shrub with ash-like compound leaves and flat-topped clusters (2–8” wide) of small, white flowers. A cultivar of black elderberry (S. nigra) also began to bloom. Red elderberry (S. racemosa) finished blooming a while ago.
    [‘Black beauty’ elderberry & honey bee, June 2018]
    Black elderberry.jpg

    •Escallonia (Escallonia x exoniensis): several varieties are commonly planted as evergreen ornamental shrubs. They have small, oval, glossy green leaves and small 5-lobed flowers, white, pink or rosy red, which can be found throughout summer.
    [Escallonia & honey bee] https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/pos...m?postnum=2936

    •Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus): one of the major nectar sources in my area, probably #1 in most years. It is a robust, thicket forming, thorny shrub with white or pinkish 5-petal flowers and compound leaves with five leaflets (three on younger stems). In some areas, cutleaf evergreen blackberry (R. laciniatus) may be more common, which looks similar to the Himalayan except that each of five leaflets is further divided.
    [Himalayan blackberry & honey bee, June 2018]
    Blackberry.jpg

    •Morning glory or hedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium):
    [Morning glory & honey bee, August 2018]
    bindweed.jpg

    •Multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora): a climbing shrub with thorns, pinnately compound leaves, and very showy pyramidal clusters of white or pinkish, 5-petal flowers.
    [Multiflora rose & honey bee, May 2018]
    Multiflora rose.jpg

    •Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus): a native shrub, 3’ - 6’ tall, with oppositely arranged, oval or irregularly lobed leaves. Small, bell-shaped, pink flowers later turn into white berries.
    [Snowberry & honey bee, July 2018]
    Snowberry.jpg

    •Tulip poplar, tulip tree, or yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera): a fairly common landscaping tree, native to the eastern US, with 4-lobed, heart-shaped leaves and greenish yellow, tulip-like flowers. I do not know whether it gives a good nectar flow here as it does in southern states, but its pollen was quite popular with my bees last year; during June 2018, 25, 17, and 17% of pollen found in my hives were of blackberry, black locust, and tulip popular, respectively.
    [Tulip poplar & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Puh_-raPy2A

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    bellflower (campanula), catmint or catnip (Nepeta cataria), fava bean (Vicia faba), firethorn (Pyracantha), Franchet's cotoneaster (Cotoneaster franchetii), Japanese meadowsweet (Spiraea japonica), lacy phacelia or blue tansy (Phacelia tanacetifolia), purple toadflax (Linaria purpurea), salvia varieties (Salvia spp.), small-leaf privet (Ligustrum sinense or L. vulgare), yarrow (Achillea millefolium), yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea), and etc.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  20. #279
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    It was dry and warm during the past week, and black locust trees appeared to be in full bloom, but I did not find much progress in honey supers yesterday. The most popular pollen source of the week was tulip poplar (~40%). Blackberry bushes looked like 20% in bloom this afternoon.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/27 - 6/2/19

    [Honey bees on blue flax, oriental poppy, ceanothus, mustard, and black elderberry]

    Blue flax.jpgorientalpoppy.jpgCeanothus.jpgMustard.jpgBlackelderberry2.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  21. #280
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Washington

    (Continued from post#279)

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •5/27 - 6/2/19

    •New blooms

    •Chinese photinia (Stranvaesia davidiana, aka Photinia davidiana): a fairly common, large evergreen ornamental shrub with clusters of small, white, five petaled flowers. I think honey bees like it much better than similar-looking and more commonly planted red tip photinia (Photinia × fraseri, pretty much done blooming).
    [Chinese photinia & honey bee, May 2018]
    Chinese photinia.jpg

    •Japanese euonymus or evergreen spindle (Euonymus japonicus): an evergreen shrub with variegated (yellow and green), oppositely arranged leaves and small, four-petaled flowers.
    [Japanese euonymus & honey bee, May 2018]
    Euonymus.jpg

    •Japanese snowbell (Styrax japonicus) a small ornamental tree with numerous, white, bell-shaped flowers.
    [Japanese snowbell & honey bee, May 2018]
    Japanese snowbell.jpg

    •Portuguese cherry laurel (Prunus lusitanica): a common evergreen hedge plant, sometimes grown as a small tree, with shiny, alternate leaves and 5”-10” long clusters of small, white, 5-petaled flowers. It is quite invasive, although not as bad as English cherry laurel (P. laurocerasus), which finished blooming a while ago.
    [Portuguese laurel & honey bee, June 2018]
    Porrtuguese laurel.jpg

    •Stonecrop (Sedum): white stonecrop (S. album) is a common evergreen groundcover plant with small, succulent leaves and clusters of white, tiny flowers on erect stalks. Several other sedum groundcovers with white, yellow or pink flowers will bloom in the next several weeks. A much taller garden perennial, ‘Autumn joy sedum’ (Hylotelephium spectabile) will bloom in August.
    [White stonecrop & honey bee, June 2018]
    whitesedum.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    California buckeye (Aesculus californica), deutzia (Deutzia), globe gilia (Gilia capitata), Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), northern willowherb (Epilobium ciliatum), pot marigold (Calendula), speedwell (Veronica), spider flower (Grevillea), Queen Anne's lace or wild carrot (Daucus carota), and etc.

    •Conifers in bloom: a small amount of pine pollen was found in my hives, probably from western white pine (Pinus monticola), a large tree with 3-5” long needles in bundles of five, currently producing lots of powdery yellow pollen from tube-like, yellowish pollen cones. Other common pines (they seem to be past full-bloom) include shore pine (P. contorta, ~2” needles in pairs), Scots pine (P. sylvestris, looks like the shore pine except its orange-colored bark), Austrian black pine (P. nigra, ~5” needles in pairs), and ponderosa pine (P. ponderosa, ~6” needles in triples). Pollens from conifer trees are not protein-rich but my bees collect them from time to time.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

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