Washington - Page 10
Page 10 of 17 FirstFirst ... 89101112 ... LastLast
Results 181 to 200 of 321

Thread: Washington

  1. #181
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Popular flowers in the past several days were linden, waxleaf privet, lavender, and bird’s foot trefoil.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/13/17
    •Echinops (Echinops): probably E.bannaticus “Blue globe”.
    •Corn (Zea mays)
    •Hop (Humulus lupulus): the flowers are not honey bee’s favorite, but their extract is used for varroa treatment (Hopguard).
    •Lettuce (Lactuca sativa)
    •Pearly everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea)
    •Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo var. cylindrica)

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #182
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: Washington

    07/13/17
    Asparagus
    Honeybees collecting orange pollen.
    Somebody forgot to give my bees a copy of the book.
    Zone 6B

  4. #183
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    I have not found Japanese knotweed flowers and there are not many feral/wild plants in bloom (no rain since 6/20). In the past few days, honey bees were seen mostly on snowberry, cat's ear, Dutch clover, bird's foot trefoil, and remaining blackberry flowers on shady slopes. My flower garden has become very popular.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/19/17
    •Bee balm (Monarda)
    •Bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare)
    •Dill (Anethum graveolens)
    •Hollyhock (Alcea)
    •Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)
    •Japanese anemone (Anemone hupehensis)
    •Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis): its orange flowers were very popular last October.
    •Mint (Mentha)

  5. #184
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    348

    Default Re: Washington

    Bees were all over oregano bloom a few days ago.

  6. #185
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    The dry streak continues, but fortunately, Japanese knotweed began to bloom on creek banks. Last year, it kept blooming throughout the dry season, attracting lots of honey bees.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/24/17
    •Basil (Ocimum basilicum)
    •Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica)

  7. #186
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    It rained a little bit on 27th but not enough for roadside weeds to recover. Knotweed bloom is still early and lots of bees visit my garden. In July (after blackberry and before knotweed), popular garden annuals and perennials were borage, lavender, sage, oregano, forget-me-not, white sedum, bachelor's button, Shirley poppy, and globe gilia. I also saw lots of honey bees on my neighbor's crane's bill, which I will plant next year.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/29/17
    •Garlic chive (Allium tuberosum): its white flowers are much more popular among honey bees than the blue flowers of the regular chive, which bloomed in spring. Leaves taste better, too.
    •Goldenrod (Solidago), as a garden plant. I have not found a wild/feral colony in the neighborhood.
    •Mimosa (Albizia julibrissin): almost in full bloom.

  8. #187
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    We are in the middle of a heat wave, although somewhat shielded from strong sunlight by the wildfire smoke coming from British Columbia. It is still very dry, but honey/nectar in my two hives increased quite a bit during the past two weeks. The bees may have collected nectar from large mimosa trees or Dutch clovers growing in watered/un-mowed lawns, or found a good patch of Japanese knotweed.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/5/17
    •Autumn joy (Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’)
    •Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus)
    •Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)
    •Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia)
    •Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)
    •Seven sons (Heptacodium miconioides): in full bloom.
    •Sunflower (Helianthus)

  9. #188
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    At Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, the record 56-day dry streak is finally over (in my neighborhood, it rained twice during this period).

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/12/17
    •Aster (Symphyotrichum)
    •Smartweed (Polygonum)
    Both were popular among honeybees last fall.

  10. #189
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Japanese knotweed has been in full bloom for a while, attracting lots of honey bees. No rain after 8/12.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/27/17
    •Partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata)

  11. #190
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    In the past few days, I saw many honey bees on Japanese knotweed and birdsfoot trefoil. Popular garden flowers include Russian sage, borage, oregano, basil, garlic chive, crane’s bill, aspen daisy, and sedum “autumn joy”.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •9/3/17
    •Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
    •Purple beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma)
    •Shiso or Perilla (Perilla frutescens var. crispa): After bees are done pollinating, I collect seedpods and preserve them in soy sauce (tasty on rice or pasta).

  12. #191
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Around creeks and wetlands, Japanese knotweed passed its peak and jewelweed became very popular. We had the first soaking rain since June, so hopefully a variety of weeds will bloom again. In my garden, bees work on perilla, basil, garlic chive, and partridge pea.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •9/20/17
    •English ivy (Hedera helix): found a few blooms in a very sunny location, among numerous flower buds. Flow will probably start in 1-2 weeks.

  13. #192
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Washington, USA
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: Washington

    Rabbitbrush is starting to pick up.
    And another (unidentified) white bush started a bit back.
    Somebody forgot to give my bees a copy of the book.
    Zone 6B

  14. #193
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    I think the ivy flow started earlier this week, when honey bees disappeared from my flower garden and began bringing in big loads of orange-yellow pollen. Last year, it lasted for about a month.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •10/6/17
    •Sunchoke or Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus): the root is edible (acquired taste).

  15. #194
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Lots of honey bees were seen on ivy flowers.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •10/14/17
    •Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo): “Bitter honey" is produced from this plant in some Mediterranean countries.

  16. #195
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    The ivy bloom passed its peak while ago but I can still see some honey bees working on them.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •10/26/17
    •Laurustinus or laurestine (Viburnum tinus): keeps blooming throughout winter until spring.
    •Winter heath (Erica carnea or its hybrid): was very popular among over-wintered bumble queens last spring.

  17. #196
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Ivy flowers are getting scarce and today I only saw wasps on them. My bees brought back yellow pollens.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •11/8/17
    •Witch-hazel (Hamamelis): as a garden plant. Probably the fall blooming American witch-hazel (H. virginiana).

  18. #197
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Wild/feral flowers are gone, except for a little bit of ivy and dandelion (and its look-alikes). It was a rare dry day and my bees brought back some yellowish pollens.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •11/17/17
    •Japanese aralia, fatsi, or paperplant (Fatsia japonica): an evergreen garden shrub, distantly related to English ivy. Maybe not much use to honey bees here in our wet-cold weather but apparently it is one of the late-fall nectar sources in Japan.

  19. #198
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Happy black Friday. My bees brought back a little bit of yellow pollen.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •11/24/17
    •Camellia: found it already past full-bloom, must be a fall blooming variety (C. sasanqua?). Many other varieties will bloom during winter-spring. Here are nice photos of C. japonica by Glenn apiaries, California.
    http://www.glenn-apiaries.com/bee_ph..._japonica.html

  20. #199
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    My bees fly around when it is dry, but I have not seen any pollen coming in for ~10 days. Calendula, camellia, dandelion, fragrant viburnum, Japanese aralia, laurestine, pansy, primrose, rosemary, strawberry tree, winter heath, and yarrow are in bloom in my neighborhood. Some are almost gone, others may be weeks or months away from full bloom. They are listed elsewhere as honey bee friendly but I guess they have to be planted near beehives to be useful during late-fall - winter.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •12/5/17
    •Fragrant viburnum (Viburnum farreri): native to China. This site shows honey bees on the flowers (in December, at Arnold Arboretum in Boston, I believe). http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_bc9f8f830102w0ee.html

  21. #200
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    618

    Default Re: Washington

    Numerous catkins can be seen on alder, birch, and hazelnut (filbert), members of the birch family. European hazelnut is the first to bloom in my neighborhood.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •12/15/17
    •European hazelnut (Corylus avellana): mine is conveniently located 10’ from my hives and the bees collect its pollen in sunny afternoons of late January - mid February (the photo was taken on 1/26/16). Some catkins are seen in clusters of three, while those of beaked hazelnut (C. cornuta, the native species which will bloom later) are mostly single or double.
    hazel.jpg
    •Hellebore (Helleborus): multiple species and their hybrids are grown as shade-tolerant evergreen perennials. The one I found today was probably ‘Christmas rose’ (H. niger). Many other varieties will bloom during winter - spring. This site shows honey bees on the flowers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZhpZ3iNo7Y
    •Mahonia × media: a winter-blooming garden hybrid between Chinese and Japanese species. The native mahonias, tall and dwarf Oregon grapes, will bloom later. This site shows honey bees on the flowers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYKmhDRsIrY

Page 10 of 17 FirstFirst ... 89101112 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •