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Thread: Washington

  1. #281
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    Lake Forest Park, WA
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    Default Re: Washington

    In the past week, black locust flowers faded, tulip poplars came to full bloom, and blackberries began to bloom seriously. The bees made good progress in honey supers.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •6/3 - 6/9/19

    [Honey bees on bellflower (usually blue), common poppy, bachelor’s button (usually blue), Japanese euonymus, and blue spruce sedum]

    bellflower.jpgPoppy.jpgbachelorsbuttonpink.jpgEuonymus2.jpgSedumbluespruce.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

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  3. #282
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    Default Re: Washington

    (Continued from post#281)

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •6/3 - 6/9/19

    •New blooms

    •Fireweed (Chamerion angustifolium): an upright wildflower 2’-5’ tall, with lance shaped leaves and long stalks carrying many 4-petaled flowers, pink or red-purple. I heard monofloral fireweed honey can be harvested in mountains/foothills and tastes very good.
    [Fireweed & honey bee] https://mudsongs.org/honey-bee-frien...ower-fireweed/

    •Japanese stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamellia): an ornamental shrub or a small tree with white, camellia-like flowers.
    [Stewartia & honey bee] https://www.shadetreefarm.com/2013/0...ese-stewartia/

    •Ocean spray (Holodiscus discolor): a native deciduous shrub 4’ - 5’ tall, with lobed leaves and cascading clusters of tiny, white, 5-petal flowers.
    [Ocean spray & honey bee, June 2018]
    Oceanspray.jpg

    •Staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina); a common ornamental shrub or a small tree, with pinnately compound leaves, hairy stems, and erect clusters of tiny, greenish flowers. Female plants later produce reddish, pyramidal fruiting clusters. Quite a few escapes are found in my neighborhood. Similar-looking smooth sumac (R. glabra) with hairless stems may be native in some areas.
    [Staghorn sumac & honey bee, June 2018]
    Sumac.jpg

    •Washington hawthorn (Crataegus phaenopyrum): a small ornamental tree with lobed leaves and clusters of small, white, 5-petaled flowers. This is the last hawthorn to bloom in my neighborhood.
    [Washington hawthorn & honey bee, June 2018]
    washingtonawthorn.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants: blanket flower (Gaillardia), chicory (Cichorium intybus), lanceleaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata), persimmon (Diospyros kaki), yellow pond lily (Nuphar lutea), and etc.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  4. #283
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    Default Re: Washington

    The bees collected a good amount of nectar and pollen during long daylight hours, dry and warm throughout the past week. One colony mostly brought back gray-colored blackberry pollen while another preferred cream-colored tulip poplar.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •6/10 - 6/16/19

    •New blooms

    •Borage (Borago officinalis): an easy-to-grow annual plant, 2’ - 3’ tall, with drooping, star-shaped, bright blue, 5-petal flowers and hairy leaves.
    [Borage & honey bee, September 2018]
    Borage.jpg

    •Box-leaved holly or Japanese holly (Ilex crenata): an evergreen hedge plant, looking like a boxwood, with small, shiny, alternate leaves and tiny, white, 4-lobed flowers.
    [Box-leaved holly & honey bee, June 2019]
    boxleafholly.jpg

    •Douglas' spirea, hardhack, or rose spirea (Spiraea douglasii): a native deciduous shrub, 2’ - 6’ tall, with alternate leaves and erect, pointed clusters of numerous rosy-pink flowers.
    [Douglas’ spirea & honey bee, July 2018]
    hardhack.jpg

    •Evergreen magnolia or southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora): a small to medium sized ornamental tree with glossy green leaves and large, white flowers. It was one of my bees’ most favorite mid-summer pollen sources last year.
    [Evergreen magnolia & honey bee, July 2018]
    Southernmagnolia.jpgSouthernmagnolia2.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  5. #284
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    Default Re: Washington

    [continued from post #283]

    •Late, milkflower or parney cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lacteus): a large ornamental shrub, 6’ - 12’ tall, with alternate leaves and clusters of small, white, 5-petal flowers that later become showy red berries. This is the last cotoneaster to bloom in my neighborhood, and also the most popular with honey bees.
    [Late cotoneaster & honey bee, June 2018]
    lateCotoneaster.jpg

    •St John's-wort (Hypericum): creeping St. John's wort (aka Aaron's beard, H. calycinum) is a common groundcover plant, ~1’ tall, with oppositely arranged leaves and yellow flowers 2 - 3” in diameter, which have five petals and many long stamens. Common St. John's wort (H. perforatum), often found roadsides, is taller (2-3’), and has smaller (1”) flowers.
    [Creeping St. John's wort & honey bee, June 2018, common St. John’s wort & honey bee, August 2018]
    StJohn'swortcreeping.jpgStjohn'swortcommon.jpg

    •Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima): an invasive tree which can grow to 60’-80’ tall, with pinnately compound leaves and erect clusters of small, greenish flowers. Smaller trees may look like sumacs.
    [Tree of heaven & honey bee, June 2018]
    treeofheaven.jpg

    •Waxleaf privet (probably L. japonicum); an ornamental shrub with oval (2”-4” long), glossy green, oppositely arranged leaves, and conical clusters of small, white, 4-petal, stinking flowers. I think honey bees like it better than small-leaf privet (probably common privet, L. vulgare) which started earlier.
    [Waxleaf privet & honey bee, June 2018]
    waxleafprivet.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus), elegant clarkia (Clarkia unguiculata), glossy abelia (Abelia × grandiflora), Himalayan honeysuckle (Leycesteria formosa), hollyhock (Alcea), lamb’s ear (Stachys byzantina), mouse garlic (Allium angulosum), oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia), Pacific water parsley (Oenanthe sarmentosa), and etc.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  6. #285
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    Default Re: Washington

    We had a week of relatively cool temperatures and much needed showers, so foraging activities seemed somewhat slow, but I saw good progress in capping honey. Tulip poplars faded by the weekend. Blackberries passed their peaks in sunny locations but those on shady creekbanks just started, some of which may persist until mid-late August.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •6/17 - 6/23/19

    [Honey bees on Japanese meadowsweet, escallonia, creeping St. John’s wort, and privet]
    Japanese meadowsweet.jpgEscallonia.jpgStJohn'swortcreeping2.jpgPrivet.jpg

    •New blooms

    •American chestnut (Castanea dentata): a medium to large sized tree with long serrated leaves and slender male catkins. It is not native here but sometimes planted in large yards.
    [Chestnut & honey bee, July 2018]
    Chestnut.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  7. #286
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    Default Re: Washington

    •New blooms (continued from post #285)

    •Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense): a perennial weed, 3’ -5’ tall, with pink flowerheads and alternate leaves that are lobed and spiny (regional variations exist).
    [Thistle & honey bee, July 2018]
    canadahistle.jpg

    •Little-leaf linden (Tilia cordata): a fairly common street tree, with heart-shaped leaves and fragrant, yellow-green flowers in hanging clusters. Similar-looking American linden (aka basswood, T. americana, not native here) may not bloom every year.
    [Linden & honey bee, July 2018]
    Linden.jpg

    •Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia): a perennial plant 2’-4’ tall, with finely-dissected, gray-green leaves and numerous light blue flowers on branched flower stems.
    [Russian sage & honey bee, July 2018]
    Russiansage.jpg

    •Scotch heather (Calluna vulgaris) and Cornish heath (Erica vagans): they look alike but the former has flat, scale-like leaves and the latter has needle-like leaves.
    [Heather & honey bee, August 2018]
    ScotchHeather1.jpg
    [Heath & honey bee, July 2018]
    Cornishheath.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    beeblossoms (Gaura), Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile), evening primrose (Oenothera biennis), false spirea (Sorbaria sorbifolia), garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus), musk mallow (Malva moschata), red dragon knotweed (Persicaria microcephala ‘red dragon’), silver lace vine (Fallopia baldschuanica), summer squash (Cucurbita pepo), and etc.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  8. #287
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    Default Re: Washington

    The bees collected lots of nectar and pollen during the past week. About 90% pollen came from the blackberry, and the rest included chestnut, tulip poplar, evergreen magnolia, privet, dandelion/cat’s ear, thistle, linden, and several unknowns. We did 2 nd honey extraction of the season, probably a mixture of blackberry, tulip poplar, black locust and some leftover maple/hawthorn honey.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •6/24 - 6/30/19

    [Honey bees on clarkia, escallonia, orange stonecrop, white stonecrop, and spike speedwell]

    Clarkia.jpgEscalloniapinkprincess.jpgSedumH.jpgSedumalbum.jpgSpeedwell.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  9. #288
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    Default Re: Washington

    (continued from post #287)

    •New blooms (6/24 - 6/30/19)

    •Himalayan balsam or policeman’s helmet (Impatiens glandulifera); a large annual weed, 3’ - 6’ tall, with hollow stems, serrated leaves, and pink, helmet-shaped flowers.
    [Himalayan balsam & honey bee, August 2018]
    Himalayanbalsam.jpg

    •Jewelweed or spotted touch-me-not (Impatiens capensis): an annual wildflower 3’ - 5’ tall, often found on stream banks. It is similar but smaller than Himalayan balsam (see above) and the flowers are orange-yellow. My bees often brought back its pollen last September.
    [Jewelweed & honey bee, September 2018]
    Jewelweed.jpg

    •Lady's thumb smartweed (Persicaria maculosa aka Polygonum persicaria): a common weed 1’ - 2’ tall, with stalks of tiny white-pink flowers densely packed.
    [Smartweed & honey bee, August 2018]
    smartweed.jpg

    •Old man's beard or traveler’s joy (Clematis vitalba): a climbing vine often found on roadsides, with loose clusters of greenish white flowers that have 4-6 sepals (look like petals).
    [Old man’s beard & honey bee, August 2018]
    Clematis.jpg

    •Orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida): native to eastern North America, it is a common garden perennial with daisy-like flowers with yellow rays and brownish-purple center disks. A similar-looking annual plant, black eyed susan (R. hirta) will bloom later.
    [Orange coneflower & honey bee, August 2018]
    orangeconeflower.jpg

    •Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum): a small to medium sized ornamental tree, with long, alternate, dark-green leaves and lots of small, white, urn-shaped flowers on drooping, one-sided flower stems. I heard that monofloral sourwood honey can be harvested where it is native (a part of Eastern US), and tastes very good.
    [Sourwood & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwYGWv73ylw

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus), dill (Anethum graveolens), blue globe echinops (Echinops bannaticus), field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), Japanese anemone (Anemone hupehensis), marjoram (Origanum majorana), oregano (Origanum vulgare), single-flowered dahlia (Dahlia), and etc.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  10. #289
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    Default Re: Washington

    The blackberry flow tapered off but it was a good one, I think. See below for a summary of June nectar flow. Japanese knotweed began to bloom in very sunny locations, where it was not cut earlier.

    
•Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/1 - 7/7/19

    •New blooms

    •Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica aka Polygonum cuspidatum]: one of our major summer nectar sources. It is an extremely invasive perennial plant, up to 12’ tall, with reddish, hollow stems with nodes, large oval leaves, and erect clusters of small, creamy-white flowers. It has a long blooming period and usually peaks in August.
    [Japanese knotweed & honey bee, August 2018]
    Knotweed.jpg

    •Panicled hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata): a medium to large sized ornamental shrub with oval, dark green leaves and upright, conical clusters (to 6-8” long) of white sterile flowers and non-showy fertile flowers. It was one of my bee’s favorite pollen sources last July.
    
[Panicled hydrangea & honey bee, July 2018]
    hydrangea.jpg

    •Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea): native to eastern North America, it is a common garden perennial, 2-4' tall, with showy, daisy-like flowers with pink-purple rays.
    [Purple coneflower & honey bee, July 2018]
    Purpleconeflower.jpg

    •Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria): a perennial plant 6-10’ tall, grown in gardens or found (escaped) in moist places. It has showy spikes of numerous, reddish-purple, 5-7 petal flowers and lance-shaped leaves.
    [Loosestrife & honey bee, July 2018]
    Loosestrife.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    germander (Teucrium chamaedrys), golden rain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata), purple beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma), purpletop vervain (Verbena bonariensis), red bistort (Persicaria amplexicaulis), sunflower (Helianthus annuus), tansy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea)

    •June 2019 nectar flow recap
    Apparent peak blooms came around 5/28 (black locust), 6/8 (tulip poplar), 6/15 (blackberry in sun), 6/25 (blackberry in shade or mown earlier), and 7/1 (linden). My stronger hive had a Broodminder hive scale. Its most productive 3-day period was 6/11 - 13 (gained average 5.5 lb/day), and the 7-day period was 6/26 - 7/2 (gained average 3.4 lb/day). From this hive, 23 lb honey was extracted on 5/27 (maple/hawthorn) and ~25 lb on 6/30. Will do at least one more extraction later. My hives are in a half-shade location. Within two miles are woodlands, wetlands and residential areas.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  11. #290
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    Default Re: Washington

    Honey bees worked on various flowers, including ones they would ignore during major flows. Roadside weeds are still plentiful, thanks to regular rainfall. I heard that it will be one of the wettest Julys in decades.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/8 - 7/14/19

    [Honey bees on snowberry, birdsfoot trefoil, asparagus, butterfly bush (uncommon), and English plantain (uncommon)]
    Snowberry2.jpgBirdsfoot trefoil2.jpgAsparagus.jpgButerflybush1.jpgPlantain1.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Catalpa (Catalpa): a medium-sized ornamental tree, with showy clusters of white, orchid-like flowers. I could not tell which one of the two species (Northern and Southern, native to relatively small areas of midwestern and southeastern US).
    [Catalpa & honey bee] http://peacebeefarm.blogspot.com/2011/05/nectaries.html

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    black eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta), hardy plumbago or blue-flowered leadwort (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides), lily of the Nile (Agapanthus africanus), ramp or wild leek (Allium tricoccum)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  12. #291
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    Default Re: Washington

    The bees brought back a fair amount of pollen, drew some combs, and capped some honey. We had decent rainfall during the past week, unusual for this time of the year, but welcome.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/15 - 7/21/19

    [Honey bees on fireweed and hawkweed]
    Fireweed2.jpghawkweed.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Goldenrod (Solidago): several species are native to our state, but they are mostly found as garden plants in my neighborhood. Most species are tall perennials, with central stems clad with lance-shaped leaves, which are then topped with branched (often horizontally) flower stems carrying lots of yellow flowers. They may be good late-summer nectar sources in some areas, and are said to give ‘wet socks’ smell.
    [Goldenrod & honey bee, September 2018]
    goldenrod.jpg

    •Hardy fuchsia (Fuchsia magellanica): a large ornamental shrub with showy, pendant flowers, usually red and purple, sometimes pink or white. Last year, it was one of my bee’s favorite late-summer pollen sources.
    [Fuchsia & honey bee, September 2018]
    fuchsia.jpg

    •Trumpet vine or trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans): a climbing woody vine (up to 35’), native to eastern North America, with trumpet-shaped, orange-red (maybe yellow) flowers.
    [Trumpet vine & honey bee, September 2018]
    Trumpet vine.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    bluebeard (Caryopteris x clandonensis), common tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), mimosa or silk tree (Albizia julibrissin), shallot (Allium cepa)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  13. #292
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    Default Re: Washington

    In the past week, the bees brought back pollen from hydrangea, cat’s ear (and/or hawkweed, dandelion), evergreen magnolia, old man’s beard clematis, blackberry, evening primrose (and/or gaura), clover, poppy, squash, fuchsia, jewelweed, and several unknowns.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/22 - 7/28/19

    [Honey bees on panicle hydrangea, cat’s ear (false dandelion), and bull thistle]
    Hydrangeapanicle3.jpgcatsear2.jpgBullthistle.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica or its hybrid): a small ornamental tree with smooth barks and clusters of showy flowers, which may be white, pink, red, or purple.
    [Crape myrtle & honey bee, September 2018]
    Crape myrtle.jpg

    •Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus): an ornamental shrub, or trained as a small tree, with lobed leaves and showy 5-petal flowers (usually white, pink, or blue-purple), which may look like those of hollyhocks.
    [Rose of Sharon & honey bee, September 2018]
    rose of sharon.jpg


    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    autumn joy stonecrop (Hylotelephium spectabile aka Sedum spectabile), basil (Ocimum basilicum), garlic chive (Allium tuberosum), spearmint (Mentha spicata)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  14. #293
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    Default Re: Washington

    Japanese knotweed is now seriously in bloom here and there. We extracted the remainder of blackberry honey and put a super back on, hoping to get some strong-flavored honey.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •7/29 - 8/4/19

    [Honey bees on Japanese knotweed, silver lace vine (aka Russian vine, related to the knotweed), trumpet vine, and purple top vervain]
    Knotweed2.jpgsilverlacevine.jpgTrumpetvine2.jpgVerbena.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus): an ornamental shrub with palmately compound leaves with 5-7 leaflets and clusters of small, blue-purple (maybe white) flowers.
    [Chaste tree & honey bee, August 2018]
    Chastetree.jpg

    •Amur maackia (Maackia amurensis): a small ornamental tree (<30’ high, <30’ wide) with pinnately compound leaves and spikes of numerous off-white flowers. It is not common here (luckily my neighbor has one) but said to be an important mid-summer nectar source in its natural range in East Asia.
    [A leafcutter bee on Amur maackia. I could not find a good photo with a honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=pRpCKGA8Qfo

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    blazing star (Liatris spicata), hens & chicks (Sempervivum), Japanese angelica tree (Aralia elata), Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium purpureum), turtlehead (Chelone lyonii)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  15. #294
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    Default Re: Washington

    Honey bees were often seen on garden plants and wildflowers in wetlands. They also worked on dandelion-lookalikes still doing well on roadsides, thanks to exceptionally regular rainfall for summer.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/5/19 - 8/11/19

    [Honey bees on red osier dogwood (summer bloom), jewelweed, and blackberry]
    redosierdogwood.jpgJewelweed2.jpgBlackberry3.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Pacific aster (Symphyotrichum chilense): a perennial wildflower 1-4’ tall, mostly found in wetlands in my neighborhood (may also grow in a variety of habitats). It has violet ray flowers, yellowish disk flowers, and lance-shaped, stalkless, alternately arranged leaves.
    [Pacific aster & honey bee, September 2018]
    Asterpacific.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants:
    China aster (Callistephus chinensis), Himalayan knotweed (Koenigia polystachya, aka Persicaria wallichii. Smaller, less common, and has longer leaves than Japanese knotweed), partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  16. #295
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    Default Re: Washington

    The bees put some nectar in the honey super, probably from Japanese knotweed flowers in full bloom*. Leafcutter bees were active on >75F days, bringing small pieces of leaves and flower petals into nesting tubes.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/12/19 - 8/18/19

    [Honey bees on Russian sage, oregano, peppermint, and cucumber]
    Russiansage2.jpgOregano2.jpgmint1.jpgCucumber2.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Blue garden asters, probably cultivars of New York aster (Symphyotrichum novi-belgii) and/or New England aster (S. novae-angliae). They are common garden perennials, 2 - 4’ tall, with blue (maybe white, purple, or pink) ray flowers and yellowish disc flowers.
    [Blue garden aster & honey bee, October 2018]
    Asternewyork.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plant:
    sweetpepperbush or summersweet (Clethra alnifolia, found in full bloom with honey bees)

    *Correction to post#289 (7/7/19)
    The plant I reported as Japanese knotweed was actually giant knotweed (Reynoutria sachalinensis aka Fallopia sachalinensis), now past full bloom. Smaller and far more common Japanese knotweed (R. Japonica aka F. Japonica) started about 2 weeks later.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  17. #296
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    Default Re: Washington

    Lots of honey bees were seen on Japanese knotweed, thriving not only on creek banks but also in places that would be much drier in a typical summer.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/19/19 - 8/24/19

    [Honey bees on common tansy, Japanese anemone, and red bistort]
    tansycommon.jpgAnemonejapanese2.jpgRedbistort2.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Laurustinus (Viburnum tinus): a common ornamental shrub with evergreen, oppositely arranged leaves and clusters of small, white (or pinkish), 5-petal flowers. Started about a month early probably due to frequent rainfall (for summer). It will keep blooming throughout winter unless it gets too cold, and come to full bloom in spring.
    [Laurustinus & honey bee, January 2019]
    Viburnumtinus.jpg

    •Silverberry or thorny olive (Elaeagnus pungens): an evergreen ornamental shrub with thorns, alternately arranged leaves, and small, tubular, fragrant flowers. ‘Maculata’ with green and yellow leaves is a fairly common hedge plant.
    [Silverberry & honey bee, September 2018]
    silverberry.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plant:
    •Fall-blooming hardy cyclamen (Cyclamen hederifolium)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  18. #297
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    Default Re: Washington

    Japanese knotweed came to full bloom on shady creek banks. The bees made a fair progress in honey supers.

    [Native bees on wildflowers, along Pacific Crest Trail at 6000 ft]
    PCT2.jpgPCT3.jpg

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •8/25/19 - 9/1/19

    •New blooms

    •Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale or similar species)
    [Colchicum & honey bee] http://ellishollow.remarc.com/?p=257

    •Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides): a large ornamental shrub or a small tree, with clusters of fragrant, creamy-white flowers. The leaves are oppositely arranged, ~3.5” long, and have three prominent veins in the center.
    [Seven-son & honey bee] https://ladybookchronicles.blogspot....conioides.html
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  19. #298
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    Default Re: Washington

    I found a few ivy flowers among countless flower buds. The bees had found them (i.e., had begun bringing back some ivy pollen) a few weeks earlier.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •9/2/19 - 9/8/19

    [Honey bees on evening primrose, Pacific aster, Italian basil, and single-flowered dahlia]
    eveningprimrose1.jpgPacificaster2.jpgbasil2.jpgdhalia2.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Chinese elm or lacebark elm (Ulmus parvifolia): a medium-sized street tree with mottled barks and tiny, greenish-white flowers. Other elm species such as American and English, bloom in spring.
    [Chinese elm & honey bee, the 11- 14th photos from the top] https://ameblo.jp/kawasemi2030/entry-12308863192.html

    •Franklin tree (Franklinia alatamaha): a small ornamental tree, up to 20’ tall, with white, camellia-like flowers. Glossy dark green, oblong leaves (< 5” long) turn reddish in autumn. It used to be one of America’s native plants but now extinct in the wild.
    [Franklin tree & honey bee] https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organi...l-flowers-gone

    •Ivy (Hedera): our final major nectar/pollen source of the season, an evergreen climbing/creeping plant with umbrella-like clusters of greenish-white flowers. Its flow usually starts around the end of September. Ivy honey has a strong flavor and crystalizes quickly. I have only found English ivy (H. helix) in the neighborhood, but Irish/Atlantic ivy (H. hibernica, with larger leaves) is also listed as an invasive plant in our state.
    [English ivy & honey bee, September 2018]
    Ivy.jpg

    •Other honey bee-friendly plants: obedient plant (Physostegia virginiana), perilla (Perilla frutescens var. crispa)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  20. #299
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    570

    Default Re: Washington

    The bees went foraging between frequent showers. The most popular pollen source was ivy (60%), followed by evening primrose, fuchsia, seven-son flower, jewelweed, cherry laurel (from fall bloom of the dwarf variety?), knotweed, dandelion/cat’s ear, evergreen magnolia, true cedar, and clematis.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •9/9 - 9/15/19

    [Honey bees on China aster, perilla, and garlic chive]
    AsterChina3.jpgPerilla3.jpggarlicchive3.jpg

    •New bloom

    •Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo): an evergreen ornamental shrub or a small tree, often used as a hedge plant. Small, white or pinkish, urn-shaped, blueberry-like flowers can be found along with fruits, which are turning strawberry-red. It usually comes to full bloom around the end of October and some flowers may persist until mid January.
    [Strawberry tree & honey bee] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbCA0F-Zr24

    •Conifers in bloom: a few pollen chunks of the true cedar (Cedrus) were found in my hives. Deodar cedar (C. deodara) is a large evergreen landscaping tree native to Asia. It has green or blue-green needles (~2” long) in dense clusters. Atlas cedar (C. atlantica) and cedar of Lebanon (C. lebanon) have shorter (~1”) needles. Upright male cones (~2” long ) are producing powdery yellow pollen. Pollens from conifer trees are not protein-rich but my bees collect them from time to time.
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

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