Washington - Page 16
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Thread: Washington

  1. #301
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Washington

    English ivy is in bloom everywhere. We removed honey supers and extracted very dark honey (probably knotweed). The bees will backfill the brood nest with ivy honey, but I also feed them in case they do not get sufficient foraging hours due to rainy weather.
    .
    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •9/23 - 9/29/19

    [A honey bee on borage]
    Borage2.jpg

    •New bloom

    •Monkshood or aconite (Aconitum): an erect perennial with clusters of hooded, purplish blue flowers atop leafy stems. The one I saw was probably one of garden hybrids, rather than the native A. columbianum.
    [Monkshood & honey bee] https://www.semanticscholar.org/pape...5a875/figure/0
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

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  3. #302
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Washington

    About 95% pollen found in my hives came from the ivy (the rest were dandelion/cat’s ear, evening primrose, and jewelweed). I could smell nectar around my hives during a few, precious sunny afternoons.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •9/30 - 10/6/19

    [Honey bees on goldenrod and strawberry tree, bees bringing in ivy pollen]
    goldenrod2.jpgStrawberrytree.jpgivy pollen (entrance).jpg

    •New bloom

    •Sasanqua camellia (Camellia sasanqua): an evergreen ornamental shrub, similar, but smaller than the common camellia (C. japonica), which blooms in March. There are many varieties and hybrids between these two, starting to bloom at different times, so camellia flowers can usually be found throughout October - April.
    [Sasanqua & honey bee, October 2018]
    cameliasasanqua.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  4. #303
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Washington

    The bees worked on the ivy whenever it was dry and warm enough. We had a few frosty mornings and tender annuals are pretty much done.

    •Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
    •10/7 - 10/13/19

    [Honey bees on heath aster, English ivy, and dandelion]
    asterheath2.jpgIvy2.jpgdandelion.jpg

    •New blooms

    •Hybrid mahonia (Berberis x hortensis, aka Mahonia x media): a medium to large ornamental shrub with stalks of yellow flowers and evergreen, spiky leaves. There are several varieties with different blooming times, so their flowers can usually be found throughout winter (unless it gets too cold like last February). The native mahonia (Oregon grape, Berberis aquifolium aka Mahonia aquifolium) will start in late winter. The genus name ‘Mahonia’ was replaced with ‘Berberis’, but Berberis x media refers to a different plant, thus Mahonia x media became Berberis x hortensis.
    [Mahonia & honey bee, January 2019]
    mahoniamedia.jpg

    •Winter heath (Erica carnea): an evergreen ornamental shrub with needle-like leaves and pink (maybe white or red), urn-shaped flowers. It continues to flower throughout winter unless it gets too cold, and comes to full-bloom in early spring.
    [Winter heath & honey bee, January 2019]
    HeathWinter.jpg
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

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