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  1. #21
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    Mar 2009
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    Niskayuna, NY, USA
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    119

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    I made my first foray into sourdough last month. I began my starter Thanksgiving week and baked my first loafs with it last week. I'm not much of a baker, I'm more of a chef around the house, but I liked getting this project going.


    Attachment 22207

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Sonoma County, Ca, USA
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    457

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    That's beautiful!

    Have you got a recipe for it you can share?

  4. #23
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    Mar 2009
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    Niskayuna, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    I do. I used this video for instructions.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfWcs2k7oQ4

    275g warm water
    500g starter
    Mix together
    Add:
    400g bread flour
    100g whole wheat flour
    Mix and let stand 30 min
    Add 20g salt
    Knead 10 min, let rest 10 min
    Stretch and fold, rest 10 min (x3)
    Form ball and let rise 3-4 hours
    Remove from bowl, stretch and fold once more
    Tension the dough while forming ball
    Let rise in bowl seam side up 2-3 hours
    Bake in covered Dutch oven at 500 deg for 20 min
    Lower temp to 425-450 and bake uncovered for another 30 min

    It was easy, and delicious.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Pottstown, Pennyslvania, USA
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    724

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeBop View Post
    That's beautiful!

    Have you got a recipe for it you can share?
    Me too. Looks great. A recipe would be nice.
    Dan Boylan, When in doubt "It's mites".

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    New Haven, CT
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    404

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Bookmarking this one for the future.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado, USA
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    1,540

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Beautiful, No-sage. Yours is much better looking than the loaf in the video. Nice work!

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Sonoma County, Ca, USA
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    457

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Quote Originally Posted by No-sage View Post
    I do. I used this video for instructions.
    Bake in covered Dutch oven at 500 deg for 20 min\.

    Ahh, a Dutch oven recipe. That's good.
    I need to practice my Dutch oven recipes but using a charcoal or wood fire instead of in the oven.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Oxford, Maine
    Posts
    282

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    I like those sourdough cowboy biscuits dipped in bacon fat and baked.

    Here is one version of them, other versions use more starter.

    http://fromthefamilytable.com/2012/0...ough-biscuits/

    Got my 1st starter almost 7 years ago and have kept it going using it at least every
    other week . The strain originated in Alaska but has morphed into a northeast starter.
    Hard to eat that store bought bread anymore.
    Sourdough bread is the king.

    My version is pretty simple.

    For 2 loaves

    1/2 cup starter
    1/4 cup molasses or HONEY
    2 1/2 -3 cups warm water
    Add bread flour till it forms a ball; rest 20-30 mins.
    You can add a cup of oatmeal, WW flour or other nuts that you like but the bread flour alone
    gives the best rise
    Knead 5-10 mins adding in the 2 tsps of salt at the start.
    Let rise until near doubled then overnight it in the fridge for tangier, more fermented bread taste.
    Following day warm it , punch down, divide into 2 pans until risen to your satisfaction and bake @ 350 for 35 mins.

    We also do pizza dough and pancakes with the starter and french toast are the best.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
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    6,602

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Quote Originally Posted by Arnie View Post
    No worries, Jim.
    PM me, I'll send you some sourdough culture. You'll be up and running in a week.
    A big shout out to Arnie, got your starter and got it fed. Thanks! Gonna be sourdough bread here for Christmas. Or maybe Barry's German sweet bread.......or maybe both.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado, USA
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    1,540

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Jim, I vote 'both'!

    As long as we're on the subject of sour dough here's another one from Jeffrey Hamelman's book Bread. Great book!
    This bread recipe is more normal than mine. As much as I like wet sticky bread dough and the moist, open-crumbed results, the fact is traditional bread dough is more like this recipe. This still has a crisp crust and light crumb, and fantastic flavor. It just doesn't have quite the large holes inside. And it's much easier to work with. This is great bread.

    And BeeBop, use whole wheat instead of the rye and the flavor is more sweet/nutty. You'll like it!

    Vermont Sourdough

    First day, feed the starter.

    In the evening mix together:

    4.8 ounces (one cup) bread flour
    6 ounces (3/4 cup) water
    2 ounces (about 4 tablespoons) liquid starter.

    Let that rest over night.

    Next morning mix:

    1 lb 8 ounces (5 1/2 cups) bread flour
    3.2 ounce (7/8 cup) whole rye flour
    14.8 ounces (1 7/8 cup) water
    All the starter

    Mix this until it is just combined and let it rest for 30 minutes.

    After 30 minutes add
    1 tablespoon salt.

    Knead the dough for 6 minutes or so on medium speed.
    You will see how the dough comes together and starts to become smooth with a light sheen to it.

    Let the dough rest for 30 minutes and give it a couple folds.

    Fold again after 30 more minutes.

    After the second fold the dough will have gained some strength and be able to hold its shape. If not, fold it one more time after 30 minutes.

    Let the dough ferment until it is almost doubled. About 2 1/2 hours. A long cool ferment will enhance the flavor.

    Without deflating the dough turn it out onto your work surface and cut it and pre-shape it into an oval for a batard or a round shape.
    Let it rest 20 minutes.
    After 20 minutes, gently give it a final shape and proof it, covered, until it has risen. A word here about proofing: I have ruined more bread during the proofing stage than any other way. Over proofed bread will be flat and pale. Under proofed will be too dense. It takes a little practice to get the correct proof on a bread. Properly proofed bread will have a taut surface and you can see the air bubbles under the skin. It will feel like it has life underneath when you press your fingertip into it. It'll feel almost spongy.

    Score the loaves and bake at 460 degrees with steam for about 30 to 35 minutes.

    The loaves can be retarded after they are shaped for 8 hours or so. This will increase the sour tang.

  12. #31
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    Jul 2008
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    Aberdeen, Idaho
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    1,148

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    arnie do you see much change in flavor and activity in your start as the seasons change? Mine has a tangier more sour taste during the summer, and ferments slower. During the winter it is quite different.

  13. #32
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    Jan 2014
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    Louisville, Colorado, USA
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    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Dave, I keep mine in the fridge most of the time so it is relatively stable. It's possible that in the summer yours is getting overripe and that is why it tastes more sour and ferments slower. The balance of yeast, lactic and acetic acid bacteria sometimes gets well,,,, unbalanced. You just need to feed it and watch it. If you have a stiff sour dough and it is domed then it is mature. When it collapses it is overripe.
    If it's a liquid culture you will see a high water mark that shows it is in need of refreshing. The activity peaks and then recedes.

    The sour dough culture is a little bit like the bees , it's alive and you learn to see the signs that it may need a bit of attention to get the best results. Part science, part alchemy.

  14. #33
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    Jul 2008
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    Aberdeen, Idaho
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    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    It is refrigerated between feedings. This start is at least 40 years old. I have been married 35 years and I had it going years before that.

  15. #34
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    Jan 2014
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    Louisville, Colorado, USA
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    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Usually the bacteria that gives it the sour taste is more dominant in cooler temps. The yeast slows down in the cold.
    It changes with the locale. If I get a culture from some place it will eventually start to taste the same and act the same as my local culture.

    Good on ya for keeping it going for 40 years. Mine is 15 and I have nearly killed it a few times.

  16. #35
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    Jul 2006
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    Worcester County, Massachusetts
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    4,953

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Sandor Katz (I think in Wild Fermentation) documents that west coast starter brought east quickly turned over into the local strain. As much as I like the concept of old starters, I think what you have is always a reflection of what is local.
    Sometimes the lights all shining on me
    Other times I can barely see. -The Grateful Dead

  17. #36
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    Jul 2008
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    Aberdeen, Idaho
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    1,148

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    I am with you on it changing with the locale. I have bought San Francisco starts a couple of times. Within a month or two they taste and act just like mine.

  18. #37
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    Apr 2015
    Location
    Sonoma County, Ca, USA
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    457

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    I got my sourdough starter from Friends of Carl on 4/16/2011 and it changed quite a bit over the first year or so but seems pretty stable since then. I think it's true that they all become "local" eventually.
    I do keep mine in the fridge.

  19. #38
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    Jan 2014
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    Louisville, Colorado, USA
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    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Sour Dough Rye anyone?

    Could anybody with the name Arnie NOT have a love of, and recipe for, a 'nice rye bread' as my family would say?

    So, the evening before you bake your bread, mix together:

    1/2 cup liquid starter,
    1/2 cup rye flour, ...I use whole rye flour.
    1/4 cup water.
    Let that rise overnight.

    Next morning:

    Add 1 1/2 cup warm water,
    3/4 cup rye flour,
    2 1/2 to 3 cups bread flour, ( be careful not to mix this too dry. Rye bread dough should feel tacky to the touch.)

    Mix until the flour is wet. Let it rest 25 minutes. Then:

    Add 2 tablespoons caraway seeds,
    1/2 tablespoon salt.
    Knead this until it starts to get some strength.

    Ferment this a couple hours or so with two folds at about 30 minutes apart.

    When this is properly fermented shape it into a round or oblong loaf and let it proof. Keep an eye on this; rye bread sometimes proofs really quickly. I have over-proofed this one a few times when I have gotten distracted.

    Slash it and bake it at 460 degrees for 20 minutes and 375 for 10 more.... with steam.

    Optional cornstarch glaze for the shiny crust:
    1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch,
    6 tablespoons water.

    mix the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water. Boil the remaining water and whisk in the cornstarch slurry. Let it come to a boil so it is clear.

    Brush this onto the bread before and right after baking.

  20. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Sonoma County, Ca, USA
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    457

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    I almost tried Arnies sourdough rye recipe this weekend, but I made the mistake of mentioning English muffins to the wife and she wanted those so I made the sourdough muffins.
    Maybe next week for the rye bread.


  21. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    6,602

    Default Re: Sour Dough Bread

    Quote Originally Posted by Arnie View Post
    Sour Dough Rye anyone?

    Could anybody with the name Arnie NOT have a love of, and recipe for, a 'nice rye bread' as my family would say?

    So, the evening before you bake your bread, mix together:

    1/2 cup liquid starter,
    1/2 cup rye flour, ...I use whole rye flour.
    1/4 cup water.
    Let that rise overnight.

    Next morning:

    Add 1 1/2 cup warm water,
    3/4 cup rye flour,
    2 1/2 to 3 cups bread flour, ( be careful not to mix this too dry. Rye bread dough should feel tacky to the touch.)

    Mix until the flour is wet. Let it rest 25 minutes. Then:

    Add 2 tablespoons caraway seeds,
    1/2 tablespoon salt.
    Knead this until it starts to get some strength.

    Ferment this a couple hours or so with two folds at about 30 minutes apart.

    When this is properly fermented shape it into a round or oblong loaf and let it proof. Keep an eye on this; rye bread sometimes proofs really quickly. I have over-proofed this one a few times when I have gotten distracted.

    Slash it and bake it at 460 degrees for 20 minutes and 375 for 10 more.... with steam.

    Optional cornstarch glaze for the shiny crust:
    1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch,
    6 tablespoons water.

    mix the cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water. Boil the remaining water and whisk in the cornstarch slurry. Let it come to a boil so it is clear.

    Brush this onto the bread before and right after baking.
    Got done with a somewhat altered variation of Arnies recipe, with the starter he so generously sent to me. Wanted to use my cloche so I ended up forming 2/3rds of it into a ball and giving a final 2 hour rise in the cloche before baking 25 minutes at 425, removing the lid and brushing on some egg white then another 10 minutes at 375 without the lid. Then doing the french loaf for about 20 minutes in the same 375 degree oven with a pan of water below.
    Turned out pretty good, flavor was excellent but I didnt get quite the airiness in the bread I had hoped for. The french bread had a nice crunchiness in the crust, the round cloche not so much despite wetting the inside pretty thoroughly. Next time I'll put the pan of water in the oven when I remove the lid for the final browning.
    http://s470.photobucket.com/user/jim...vimuu.jpg.html
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

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