Benefits of yellowjackets - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Mar 2005
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,571

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    I get a great deal of needed exercise in the honey house swinging the fly swatter at them as well as running for our lives when we are in the equipment yard and pop the lid on a stack with a big nest inside! I figure My son and I drop about 5-10 pounds a season! It also helps sharpen my motor skills as swinging a swatter, a hat or an uncapping fork at a small flying object successfully requires great hand eye coordination. They also inprove my peripheral observation skills after a good sting and an adrenaline rush I am able to run the chain uncapper and see bandits at 2 o'clock with no problem.

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  3. #22
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    May 2015
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    Philomath, Benton, Oregon, USA
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    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Thanks for all the experienced input everybody. I want to design an experiment to see if yellow jacket controls influences varroa mite load. I'm still too small for a meaningful experiment, so for the time being, I will take the kill them all apprach. I won't soon forget opening my breeding nucs and finding them full of hornets.

  4. #23
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    Jun 2012
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    King County, Washington
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    163

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Start you breeding nucs earlier and you'll be fine

  5. #24
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    May 2014
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    Dayton, Ohio
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    52

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Quote Originally Posted by rbees View Post
    The presence of yellow jackets entering hives unmolested is an excellent indicator that something is not right with that hive and in it's current condition will not last the winter. I'm not sure what triggers yellow jackets to target a hive under stress, but in my experience some cue given off. It could be queenlessness...mites...disease...or whatever.

    A healthy hive that has a laying queen will not be harassed much from theses wasps. They also pick up the sick and dead in front of hives. They'll sometimes capture a returning forager, but they are not a threat to a healthy hive...even if said hive is not all that populous. We had an awful year in the Northwest. I have three frame medium nucs and the wasps left them alone. So, when I see yellow jackets singling out hives...I go in and find out what's wrong.

    With that in mind..it's almost impossible to set up queenless mating nucs in August. I would imagine they would prey on moths, but there are better ways of protecting comb. They are also predacious as heck on insects...particularly in the late summer when they are raising their reproductive. You'll see them hovering over grass picking off crane flys and such. I've yet to see Bald Faced Hornets attack hives..I do see them waiting on the sides pouncing on foragers as the come and go.

    Don't fear Yellow jackets...they are your friend...unless you stumble upon their nest.
    I think this is a very interesting topic. I have had (and continue to have) serious yellow jacket/hornet issues in my apiary this year. Prior to having hives completely picked clean as described above, I found queenless hives and hives with spotty brood patterns. Another hive I have about two miles away is very healthy with no yellow jackets in sight. However, my home apiary is being marauded by them. Even in the cold weather now (40-55) and in rain, as today, they are flying around and entering the hives at will. I reduced entrances down to one bee width and they still go in. I never see them coming out carrying anything, and I know the bees are inside still, but can't open the hives because it is so cold.
    I placed traps around the perimeter of the apiary (mountain dew, also rotting meat) but nothing attracts them except the hives themselves. Suggestions? I'm thinking my last two hives are essentially toast at this point. I'm just waiting for the snow the provide relief.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Dayton, Ohio
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    52

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Quote Originally Posted by hoosierhiver View Post
    I've noticed a lot of yellow jackets around my hives this year, probably in part from feeding above the inner cover. It looked to me that they can stand slightly cooler temps than the honeybees, anyone know if that's a fact?

    As far as I know, yellowjackets are a type of vespid wasp from Japan. They are not a native insect and I have no qualms about destroying everyone of them that I can.
    Today they are flying in the cold rainy weather here in Ohio, and the bees are in a cluster in the hive.

  7. #26
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    Apr 2014
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    Syracuse, UT
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    197

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Sat morning I plugged the hives up and swatted 201 yellow jackets. Sunday morning, I swatted another 50. Ive lost one hive so far and another is about gone. I need a hard freeze really bad.

  8. #27
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    Oct 2011
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    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    1,422

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    [QUOTE=OhioBee;1346871]I think this is a very interesting topic. I have had (and continue to have) serious yellow jacket/hornet issues in my apiary this year. Prior to having hives completely picked clean as described above, I found queenless hives and hives with spotty brood patterns. Another hive I have about two miles away is very healthy with no yellow jackets in sight. However, my home apiary is being marauded by them. Even in the cold weather now (40-55) and in rain, as today, they are flying around and entering the hives at will. I reduced entrances down to one bee width and they still go in. I never see them coming out carrying anything, and I know the bees are inside still, but can't open the hives because it is so cold.
    I placed traps around the perimeter of the apiary (mountain dew, also rotting meat) but nothing attracts them except the hives themselves. Suggestions? I'm thinking my last two hives are essentially toast at this point. I'm just waiting for the snow the provide relief.[/QUO

    Apple juice with a splash of apple cider vinegar works very well for bait for me for wasps and hornets. Add a couple tablespoons of white sugar and mix, a piece of banana peel and a couple of drops of dish soap. Don't neglect the dish soap as it disrupts the surface tension and wasp then can't walk on the surface.
    Zone 3b. If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  9. #28
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    May 2015
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    Sacramento County, CA
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    867

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    After being mercilessly stung/bitten over 20 times in a few seconds from yellow jacket subterranean wasps, my philosophy toward yellow jackets shifted:

    The only good yellow jacket is a dead yellow jacket!

    There are many, many different types of yellow jackets, hornets, wasps, etc. and killing techniques can vary immensely.

    The yellow jackets that build their paper nests up near eaves here in California are super easy to kill with the 20 ft. Spectricide wasp spray from Home Depot or Lowes. I usually destroy and totally annihilate up to 50 of these nests per year at our ranch. The Spectricide wasp spray literally paralyzes them instantly, with a certain death following within seconds.

    Yellow jacket subterranean wasps are an entirely different story...only way I know to destroy and totally annihilate these specific types of insects is to use Drione Pest Insecticide Dust...and it can be expensive. Some of the Yellow jacket subterranean wasps nests can be built up to 30 ft. from the hole in the ground. Lots of these yellow jackets like to use abandoned gopher holes/tunnels. Thankfully, our county has a program where they send teams out and locate and destroy all underground nests on the property for free. They too use the Drione Pest Insecticide Dust with puffers and dusters...

    The yellow jackets at our property are taking far more live bees than dead bees. Recently, I see anywhere from 20-100 of these yellow jackets hanging around near our bee hives. They average taking 2-5 live bees an hour on some days.

    So we have declared war on all yellow jackets here...

    Last, it may sound very simple [and it is], but one of the most effective traps we use comprises of a frying pan with left over meat juices and oils...the yellow jackets buzz the pan, then land on the oil...drowning within seconds. On a good day, we can drown up to 100 yellow jackets per hour with this type of trap.

    I am no longer interested in using traps. We are going after the queens and their nests now.

    Save yourselves lots of time and money by destroying em' at their source...
    Last edited by soarwitheagles; 11-10-2015 at 01:57 PM.

  10. #29
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    Mar 2011
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    Utica, NY
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    13,203

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    [QUOTE=mgolden;1346897]
    Quote Originally Posted by OhioBee View Post
    Apple juice with a splash of apple cider vinegar works very well for bait for me for wasps and hornets. Add a couple tablespoons of white sugar and mix, a piece of banana peel and a couple of drops of dish soap. Don't neglect the dish soap as it disrupts the surface tension and wasp then can't walk on the surface.
    This does not attract honeybees?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  11. #30
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    Oct 2011
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    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    [QUOTE=Acebird;1346938]
    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden View Post
    This does not attract honeybees?
    Absolutely does not attract honeybees. The bait is in a wasp trap.

    Think I was told that the banana peel works to repel honeybees.
    Zone 3b. If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  12. #31
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    Feb 2014
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    Clinton, Iowa
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    6,032

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden View Post
    Think I was told that the banana peel works to repel honeybees.
    Interesting. During dearth last year my brother had some very ripe bananas that had somehow ended up in the back of his truck. Bees were buzzing down into the bed back and forth. I poked my head in to see them working the bananas.

    Not sure that banana really repels them... who knows.

  13. #32
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    Oct 2011
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    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    All I can say is that I had traps out with bait as per above and zero bee deaths. I caught a lot of wasps since about Aug 1 and am having very little problem with robbing yellow jackets. There are very few of them around.

    Our summer was dry and when that happens the yellow jacket increase in population.
    Zone 3b. If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  14. #33
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    Jul 2008
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    Aberdeen, Idaho
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    1,148

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    I have used the banana peel wasp traps and found that they trapped very few bees. Just 2-3 a year with upwards of a dozen traps right around the bee yard.

  15. #34
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    Mar 2011
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    Utica, NY
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    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden View Post
    Think I was told that the banana peel works to repel honeybees.
    You want to start the banana peel thing again? Not going to sidetrack....
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  16. #35
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    May 2015
    Location
    Philomath, Benton, Oregon, USA
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    31

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    There's a big difference between the taste of a ripe banana and a banana peel.

  17. #36
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    May 2015
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    Sacramento County, CA
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    867

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    As I mentioned earlier, we no longer will devote endless hours to making/placing traps for the yellow jackets. Instead, we are eliminating the queens and her nests...

    But here are a couple of pics of the traps we made/used. One is the frying pan with left over meat juices and oil. It proved to be extremely effective by trapping/drowning dozens of yellow jackets per hour...more than one hundred per day. Yellow jackets appear to be really stupid by falling for such a dumb trick.

    The other trap shown was a used stink bug trap with some cooked chicken inside. Lasts for about 2-3 days before getting too full and/or needing to be re-baited...

    Njoy!

    wasp trap 1.jpgwasp trap 2.jpg

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
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    578

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Quote Originally Posted by soarwitheagles View Post
    As I mentioned earlier, we no longer will devote endless hours to making/placing traps for the yellow jackets. Instead, we are eliminating the queens and her nests...

    But here are a couple of pics of the traps we made/used. One is the frying pan with left over meat juices and oil. It proved to be extremely effective by trapping/drowning dozens of yellow jackets per hour...more than one hundred per day. Yellow jackets appear to be really stupid by falling for such a dumb trick.

    The other trap shown was a used stink bug trap with some cooked chicken inside. Lasts for about 2-3 days before getting too full and/or needing to be re-baited...

    Njoy!

    wasp trap 1.jpgwasp trap 2.jpg
    I usually just leave a half empty PBR laying around somewhere...by accident.

  19. #38
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    Aug 2014
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    Johnson City, TN
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    257

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Just thought I'd chime in. I have noticed that yellow jackets are able to enter my hives with no problems in the early morning before the guard bees are patrolling. The yellow jackets seem to begin foraging earlier in the day. Once I alert them in the morning with a knock on the hive they will begin to fend them off.

    Also the yellow jackets will remember where the opening is on my robber screen so I will change it up during robbing season. The one I bought has 3 openings.
    4th Yr. 8 hives. Italian/Carniolan apiary. 3 loss over 4 yr. W.NC location.
    https://instagram.com/jacquelinehinshaw/

  20. #39
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    Aug 2011
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    KC, MO, USA
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    4,646

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioBee View Post
    Prior to having hives completely picked clean as described above, I found queenless hives and hives with spotty brood patterns.
    These are not problems cause by yellow jacket, your queenless hives are most likely swarms and hive failed to make a new queen. Your spotty brood patterns hives are EFB or mites.

  21. #40
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    May 2014
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
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    52

    Default Re: Benefits of yellowjackets

    I just lost my third hive to these yellow bithces. I have tried traps. I have tried to find their nests. All has failed. They continue to hunt down my bees, overwhelming them, cutting off their heads and then eventually wiping out the hive. It's terrible. The only thing I have been able to do to curtail it is to completely block off hive and then open it (reducing to the size of one bee). This seems to give my girls a fighting chance to at least defend the opening. However, when temps drop and they go into the the interior of the hive, the opening is quickly overrun by yellow jackets.

    Today I'm going to try building a robbing screen and see how that goes. This is the last hive I have left at this location. Funny thing is at my other location, there are ZERO yellow jackets. I considered moving my hive.

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