Bee Invasion
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Thread: Bee Invasion

  1. #1
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    Mar 2015
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    Question Bee Invasion

    I put an outside feeder near my Hive. I noticed the Bees were fighting one another, they were biting the legs of other Bees and basically wrestling and fighting but not stinging each other to death. Just biting other Bees and their legs, some would gang up on one and beat it up and drag it to the ground and hold on to its leg. Freeked me out.

    Then I noticed Darker bees not My Italians but Russian types my Italians were fighting. My Italians were not fighting amongst themselves but fighting the Russians. I removed my outdoor feeder and closed one entrance so my Bees could defend their colony better.

    Do you agree with my assessment and my action, robbers and removing the Feeder, and closing off an entrance.

    1 MORE SCARY THING: I have a bottom board, sticky board USED for Varroa assessment. I pull the board out and I see little worms, yes small larvae like worms, I donít think they are bee Larva, and my hive has recently become hot. I donít know why but I donít want to open it up all the way unless I have to... Any idea what those worms were...? 1\4 in. long and very thin, like a fly larvae. Nothing smelt bad. Bees appear healthy the hive is very active.
    ?????????? thanks BTB

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    Outside feeding is what you do if you want to cause robbing. Reduce your entrances and stop the outside feeding. Don't even feed inside the hives for about a week.

    The little worms are either wax moth or SHB larvae. You need to go through the hive and identify the problem and correct it.

    1) for the SHB a Freeman style bottom board with an oil tray will help. You may want to put some diatomaceous earth under the hive.

    2) for Wax moth and SHB. make sure the bees do not have more comb than they can defend. Pull any affected frames out and let them spend about 3 days in the freezer to kill the larvae. The bees will clean them up when you put them back, but only let the bees have as much comb as they can defend.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeTheBee View Post
    1 MORE SCARY THING: I have a bottom board, sticky board USED for Varroa assessment. I pull the board out and I see little worms, yes small larvae like worms, I don’t think they are bee Larva, and my hive has recently become hot. I don’t know why but I don’t want to open it up all the way unless I have to... Any idea what those worms were...? 1\4 in. long and very thin, like a fly larvae. Nothing smelt bad. Bees appear healthy the hive is very active.
    ?????????? thanks BTB
    Sounds like small hive beetle larvae, but a lot of larvae look like that. My "hot" colony started as a nuc a couple of months back, and had SHB hiding in their double-screened bottom board when I got them. Their new digs featured an IPM sticky-board, and over the next week or two I watched it record the carnage to the SHB population. In addition to the adults, the hive purged a variety of small larvae, from about 3/8" down to around 1/8", presumably SHB larvae in various stages. When you see these larvae you should inspect for "slimed" frames (SHB larvae tend to infect honey and turn it in to a disgusting mess the bees won't touch). In my case, I saw no slime and all frames were occupied by active bees. These onery bees had completely dealt with the problem on their own. Color variation in this hive is extreme, including some with nearly black abdomens, and I expect a fair amount of Russian genetics.

    You need to watch that hive for signs of beetles or slimed combs, but if you have a strong population covering the frames, they may have dealt with it themselves.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    [QUOTE=dsegrest;1321343]Outside feeding is what you do if you want to cause robbing. Reduce your entrances and stop the outside feeding. Don't even feed inside the hives for about a week.

    I agree with this up to a point.I believe you are feeding much too close to your hives. Some time back Cleo Hogan put up a picture of a "hog trough" open feeder with the statement that it did not drown many bees. I tried this for myself and it works just as he said it would. At the end of the day there may be a dozen dead bees in the trough even though there were millions? covering the trough until the feed was used up. The secret is to put the feeder as far from your colonies as practical. I put mine about 200 feet away and on the other side of a couple of buildings.I have seen no fighting,nor robbing, and it sure makes feeding much simpler.
    54+ years 16 colonies Treat using OAV
    http://99-40.com

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    How many bumbles and wasps are you feeding this way? Hummingbirds?

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebee View Post
    How many bumbles and wasps are you feeding this way? Hummingbirds?
    In year one, I fed right in front of the hives. I couldn't figure out why I lost so many to robbers.
    Lately I try to feed from the other corner of my property., & use robber screens. I have done "inside the hive feeders, but as others mentioned it is tedious, & time consuming, leaks make a terrible mess, & I have lost nucs this way. ( might as well blame this, its all my fault, whatever happens.
    lately I have dumped the dregs of my sugar bucket into a pan with some grass stems in it for floats.
    about 11 am, there were twice as many bumbles as honey bees, but at 1 pm, the honeys out numbered all the others by 10 to one or better.
    I don't mind feeding the wild life a little if it achieves my goals in my hives.
    BTW, open feeders are like washing your car or hanging out laundry, it causes rain. ... CE
    Started summer of 2013, just another new guy, tinkering with bees.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    Any given forage in our area has 10x the number of bumbles as honeybees, and the hummingbird feeders cause more than enough fighting for our tastes. What we don't have (this year) is another apiary in foraging range. Last year there was an out-yard about 3 miles away but they vanished in almond season and never came back. But I think I'll stick with top feeders.

    For anyone trying this, an idea in another thread sounds like it might be fun to try with an open feeder ... put some food coloring in the syrup and see where it winds up. If you had a neighbor that kept bees, you might find out if they suddenly had colored nectar in their combs.

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    Phoebee says,among other negative things.>>>For anyone trying this, an idea in another thread sounds like it might be fun to try with an open feeder ... put some food coloring in the syrup and see where it winds up. If you had a neighbor that kept bees, you might find out if they suddenly had colored nectar in their combs.
    Why don't you give this an honest try before looking for the negatives? Yes,I feed a few bumbles,a few wasps and probably a few of the neighbors bees as well.So what?The bumbles and wasps need to eat too and the saving in time is well worth the tiny bit of lost syrup. I might also add that this is an excellent way to rid your property of yellow jackets.I spend a few minutes by the feeder each day and nail any YJ that happens by.They are easy prey when filling up with syrup.
    54+ years 16 colonies Treat using OAV
    http://99-40.com

  10. #9
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    May 2013
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    Laurel Hill, Fl
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    You didn't say how close the open feeder was to the hives. Mine is 75 yards from the hives, doesn't cause any fighting, or robbing. I've had them take as much as 3 gallons in a day. Thou I usually only give a half gallon or a gallon a day and spread the feeding out over a week or more. You do feed some locals, but the cloud of bees feeding are 99% mine. I do feed weak hives directly with internal feeders while open feeding the strong hives. That way the only hive with the smell of syrup is not my weakest hive...

    The Larva sound like SHB larva, and you are in real trouble if it is. Very difficult to save a hive that has already reached the stage where larva are falling on the bottom board.
    Robbin NW Florida(8A) / 14 hives / 5 Nucs / 6th Year / T {OAV & MMK}

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Bee Invasion

    Remember if you open feed your feeding other bees if their close by. If your feeding to close they may be looking at the closest hives as targets of oppritunity.

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