Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 54 of 54
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk Co, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,625

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by waynesgarden View Post
    ....instead of worrying about how he's going to keep his hives from being killed by mites, or keep them from swarming, or protect them from robbing or how he's going to get them through the winter without starving as should be the main concerns as are likely yours and still are mine,



    My only reason for participating in this thread (as with the other thread where the newbie was killing bumble bees to "infect" honeybees with "beneficial" micro-organisms,) is so that future readers that stumble on this tread don't think this guy is presenting acceptable and rational solutions.



    Wayne (Noted Internet Troll)
    why is the mastery of the basics of beekeeping in one's location not good enough for so many??

    how time consuming will it be to point out all of the ridiculous solutions dreamed up for so many imaginary issues?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Berthoud, Colorado USA
    Posts
    42

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    I know rubber necking stops traffic but I always have to look before I speed off. This thread is much the same as much as I know I should move on I can't help myself. Good on ya Russa for sticking to your ill armed guns I give you credit for that but I cannot for the life of me think of a more ill thought out hypothesis. Now I can stop gawking. Maybe

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    West Point, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Thanks for the reply Acebird, even with a test patch I could see where honey production could be greatly affected. In say this because of the bee counts went from one or two honey bees every several square feet to ten to fifteen per square foot, a huge difference. In my area at this time when Anise Hyssop would be in bloom it could easy be the number one nectar flow. Planting a acre is very labor and cost intensive, twenty thousand plants must be started in four inch pots with good medium, and taken care of, then twenty thousand holes must be dug (you see the point). Of all the Anise Hyssop seeds that I planted by hand in the field this year very few came up, of all the seeds from the same order I planted in pots none have been lost. I understand that there are a million ways and reasons that the bumblebees and the honey bees can not be separated on a larger scale but after all that, there must be one way it can happen, they are after all creatures of habit and instinct. I found your last statement a bit humorous, no beekeeper I know has any money from bee keeping, could be just coincidental.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by RUUSA View Post
    no beekeeper I know has any money from bee keeping,
    That is a strange statement. Surely you don't believe that?

    I think anyone who tries to plant for nectar returns would go broke if this was the only bee's source.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Panama City, Florida, USA
    Posts
    1,046

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by RUUSA View Post
    Thanks for the reply Acebird, even with a test patch I could see where honey production could be greatly affected. In say this because of the bee counts went from one or two honey bees every several square feet to ten to fifteen per square foot, a huge difference.
    .

    You know no such thing. Correlation is not causation. You changed one variable of many. There are other reasons the number of honeybees may have increased in the time frame you were tweezing bumblebees. As others have said, different bees work different blooms at different times of the day. That is one possibility. Another is that the earlier honeybees did their dance for their hive mates thus increasing visits to your patch. There are endless other possibilities. Your test proved nothing as you only controlled one variable of many and the only made one observation. Poor scientific procedure and application leads to poor conclusions. Keep wasting your time killing bumblebees and you will lose a lot more honey to mites, SHB, etc than you will ever lose to bumblebees.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    http://www.motherearthliving.com/pla...se-hyssop.aspx
    Anise hyssop is easily grown from seed, either by starting indoors as you would tomatoes or by sprinkling outside in spring or fall. Fall-planted seed will remain dormant and then sprout in the spring; this is the way mature plants sow their seed, after all. Your established anise hyssop will produce plenty of volunteer plants for you to share with friends or use to expand your planting. Fortunately, they’re extremely easy to transplant. Plantings can be increased by root division, too.
    This plant is easy to care for. It will thrive in full sun in well-drained garden soil — good news for the dry-land gardener.
    This appears to be a more northern plant. Being part of the mint family I can see where it would be easy up here to grow. It seems like you are trying to fight nature with your plantings and bees.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    4,646

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    >it is not my intent to kill off the bumblebees.
    But that's exactly what you did. And killed off enough to void your flowers of bumble bees, possibly killing one of your local bumble bee colonies.

    >As it turned out in my opinion the bumble bees were the problem


    >Now how much money will I lose having to sell wildflower honey as opposed to premium Anise honey counting the volume of honey that may have been lost.
    How much honey did a few bumble bees collect from a small patch of flowers that honey bees did not collect that would not have been used to raise honey bee brood?

    >That will determine how much money can be invested in finding away to separate the bees
    Who is going to invest in that? You?
    Exactly much money are you going to spend to keep bumble bee off your flowers?

    >Again thank you for being the one giving some benefit of the doubt.
    Which bumble bees did you give the benefit of the doubt when you slaughtered them and their whole family? Was it the endangered species? Or just threatened one?

    >even with a test patch I could see where honey production could be greatly affected.
    Really how? You don't have anything to compare, you have no historical data, you don't have any test areas with and without bumbles, you don't have a control, you have no studies of any kind, nothing you have done is even close scientific.
    Here's something for you to compare; some bumble bee populations are down 97% where are the bumper honey crop because of it.

    Take it from every beekeeper that posted on this thread all seem to agree; "As others have said, different bees work different blooms at different times of the day." "honey bees working side by side with bumble bees" this is coming from many different beekeepers with years of beekeeping experience.

    Where are your "opinion" coming from?

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    West Point, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    FlowerPlanter I can appreciate your interest and zeal however your link was to an article that was written about another article that was written about a case study. In that study this is what it had to say " Furthermore, causal factors leading to the alleged decline of bumble bee populations in North America remain speculative." It also stated that the honey bee is more important than the bumble bee. It seems that the authors of the first two articles only cherry picked what their readers wanted to hear.Thank you for the link even if it took a little time to trace down the actual scientific study. What was really funny to me is that the web site where the actual study is found "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America" is bookmarked on my favorites bar. I did pick up on something I want to try when they spoke about the bumble bee buzz, if I can get my hands on a high frequency sound generator. So pat yourself on the shoulder you have done something good even if you did not intend it that way.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    West Jordan, UT, USA
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Now that I think about it, I smell a troll.

  11. #50
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,699

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    After 40 years of beekeeping, I've come to realize that the bees can fix most of my mistakes.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    West Point, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by clyderoad View Post
    why is the mastery of the basics of beekeeping in one's location not good enough for so many??
    basics is basics, mastery is a different level

    how time consuming will it be to point out all of the ridiculous solutions dreamed up for so many imaginary issues?
    I am sure that it would take a long time to point out all the things like electricity, the automobile, the telephone, and at some point somebody came up with the ridiculous solution called the wheel. Some really crazy people who put up with a lot to make everyone's life a little better. Have a nice day

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    West Point, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by Hops Brewster View Post
    Now that I think about it, I smell a troll.
    Take a bath: problem solved: glad I could help

  14. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    West Point, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    http://www.motherearthliving.com/pla...se-hyssop.aspx


    This appears to be a more northern plant. Being part of the mint family I can see where it would be easy up here to grow. It seems like you are trying to fight nature with your plantings and bees.
    It is a more northern plant and there reasons I chose it. In the clay soil here I did not have much luck with broadcast sowing, however the plants which were planted from pots are doing very well, average about three feet tall and loaded with blooms. I tried gibberellic acid @ fifty parts per million on some but it seemed to have a negative effect as those plants are less than two feet tall with less blooms. Now the reasons I went with it is, it has a very heavy nectar flow and I can time it to be in bloom when everything else is finished for the summer. I have also tried Sainfoin but here it will need to be planted on ridges to withstand the spring rains.

  15. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: Bumblebee vs. Honey Bee

    Quote Originally Posted by RUUSA View Post
    In the clay soil here I did not have much luck with broadcast sowing,
    It can't be the clay soil. I grow a lot in clay soil. There is some science about how some seeds have to get triggered to germinate by going through winter. I am not sure if it is temperature or what. Maybe if you put them in the freezer prior to planting it would help. I don't know. I am only guessing.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •