"Storing Wet Frames"??
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bastrop County, TX USA
    Posts
    313

    Default "Storing Wet Frames"??

    In reading various threads I see references to 'storing wet frames', usually in discussions on how and when to harvest honey. Since the beeks seem to put the wet frames back into the hive for the bees to clean up and use, or store them, the question comes to mind how do you store wet frames? Why store them wet, rather than at least putting them outside the hives for the bees to clean up?

    I do not have a honey house, nor a freezer large enough to handle a large number of frames. Even when trying to just store frames with clean comb I have had trouble with wax moths, even if I freeze them first then try to seal them into plastic bags (I am trying bt now). I can just imagine the problem if I had wet frames. I expect I would have masses of robbers and wax moths all over the place.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    4,323

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    I put mine out for the bees to clean up IF I have too many to put right back on.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,922

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    The only time I tried to store wet frames was a disaster that I am still paying for...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Brown County, IN, USA
    Posts
    646

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Beeman View Post
    I put mine out for the bees to clean up IF I have too many to put right back on.
    I'll agree, but be sure they aren't too close to the hives or you may trigger robbing, especially at the right (wrong) time of year! If you can't give them the distance they deserve, put on robbing screens, or put the wet supers on hives directly. Even a weak hive can clean up a super full of wet frames in a day or so. It's really quite amazing how clean they get them!

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
    Posts
    1,612

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Beeman View Post
    I put mine out for the bees to clean up IF I have too many to put right back on.
    I have always done the same thing.After the bees clean the I would spray with Bt and stack them all under the shed till needed.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Brazoria County, Texas
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    I take mine down the road where I know there are no beeks hives nearby and leave them there for a full day.
    Any bees in the area will show and clean them up for ya and will not cause robbing.
    After dark collect them up, spray them down with BT and store them.
    Used to be just moths, and wet ones were not that bad an issue but now with the SHB's everywhere and they will lay, hatch, an raise some beetles and slime any remaining honey on the comb.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Olmsted County, MN USA
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    The experienced - and vocal - beeks in our local club insist that storing honey supers wet was a surefire way to prevent wax month infestation. Truth or Fiction?
    Christian (Chris) Schad
    Website: TheBeeShed.com, Facebook: The Bee Shed

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,922

    Default Re: "Storing Wet Frames"??

    I had nice white wax and no cocoons (I had been using an excluder). I stored them wet in my basement. I had been told that wax moths would not eat comb that had no cocoons or pollen in it. (this was also pre SHB days) Lesser wax moths i have since learned will eat at a solid block of wax (granted they can't eat much). They will eat white wax with no cocoons. They can live on a speck of wax for generations (I watched several in my observation hive between two pieces of glass. I still have lesser wax moths in my basement 15 years later and now that I moved to the new house, they managed to get in my new house as well. White wax may stop greater wax moths. I seriously doubt that wet supers will. Neither white wax nor wet supers will stop lesser wax moths.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

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