Today in the Apiary - Page 135
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  1. #2681
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
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    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    First , it is starting to rain - whoopee!

    I recently installed a mated queen via a push-in cage, released after 4 days. The next day I thought the bees had changed attitude. A few days more and the entrance seems back to normal; guards, foraging pollen coming in - just light on bees. I will check for sure soon.

    Another install earlier with a drunken queen with a broken leg or so it seemed was put in days earlier via a push-in cage. Still not sure what happen but her brood patterns on multiple deep frames looks great. I will never know what initially happen to her. Maybe a CO2 issue from being in my pocket?

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  3. #2682
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    2,711

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Delivered a small split and swarm trap catch to my daughter today, bright and early. Down to a maintainable apiary again. Whew! J

  4. #2683
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Push-in cage queen install 2 for 2! After a long Spring struggle with two queens replaced via a push-in cage approach, I have two solid queen right hives. My third problem hive, after an undetected swarming event, has a new open mated queen laying. All is good in the apiary for at least a day.

  5. #2684
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    ^Nice Robert!

    Bees were very gentle today - thankfully because it's too freaking hot for a suit and gloves. Added a 3rd super (undersupered) to one hive, but it's foundation and I don't see it doing much in the coming dearth. The lack of rain really isn't helping, but this hive sure seems to have been packing honey the last couple of weeks. Other hive finally has eggs after being queenless for almost two months! I was losing hope after buying the nuc then needing to buy another queen and leaving them alone for 9 days, only to find her released from the cage but nowhere to be found and no eggs for a few weeks after that. Thankfully I was able to add several frames with eggs in them over a few weeks from the strong hive and finally it's queen-right. I added a super of foundation above a queen excluder a couple of weeks ago and they are not in the least bit interested in it. I removed the excluder today and we'll see what happens...
    Last edited by jimbo3; 07-02-2020 at 02:24 PM.

  6. #2685
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    448

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    You should still have both sumac and ‘bamboo’ honey before the dearth that’ll precede asters & goldenrod. I’m hoping for these young bees to get busy & draw me some frames down in New Haven.

  7. #2686
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    2,123

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo3 View Post
    ^Nice Robert!

    Bees were very gentle today - thankfully because it's too freaking hot for a suit and gloves. Added a 3rd super (undersupered) to one hive, but it's foundation and I don't see it doing much in the coming dearth. The lack of rain really isn't helping, but this hive sure seems to have been packing honey the last couple of weeks. Other hive finally has eggs after being queenless for almost two months! I was losing hope after buying the nuc then needing to buy another queen and leaving them alone for 9 days, only to find her released from the cage but nowhere to be found and no eggs for a few weeks after that. Thankfully I was able to add several frames with eggs in them over a few weeks from the strong hive and finally it's queen-right. I added a super of foundation above a queen excluder a couple of weeks ago and they are not in the least bit interested in it. I removed the excluder today and we'll see what happens...
    Maybe bring up a frame of open brood above the excluder into the super, bring the bees up.
    Proverbs 16:24

  8. #2687
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    I was told by an old beekeeper to spray 1:1 syrup on plastic foundation to stimulate comb drawing. It "seems" to help but since I have had bigger, better colony survivals earlier in the Spring I have not noticed any problem. Everything I have is drawn out..

  9. #2688
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    Maybe bring up a frame of open brood above the excluder into the super, bring the bees up.
    That's actually a good idea that I didn't think about when I took the excluder off. I don't even know why I put the excluder on. I think I was trying to keep track of where the potential new queen could be.

  10. #2689
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Knisely View Post
    You should still have both sumac and ‘bamboo’ honey before the dearth that’ll precede asters & goldenrod. I’m hoping for these young bees to get busy & draw me some frames down in New Haven.
    When do you think the dearth will start? Do you remove the supers and harvest before the dearth? Do you typically harvest fall honey? I harvested a small amount of fall honey last year and it ended up crystallizing. The spring honey stayed liquid.

  11. #2690
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    2,123

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    When inspecting a hive the end of June I found a queen with deformed wings trying to unsuccessfully lay eggs. I squished her thinking there had to be another queen. Today I checked again, there were eggs in there in addition to open brood. Methinks this was a 2 queen hive. I treat for mites, did all last year, and successfully overwintered all the hives. Where did this queen come from with deformed wings? If DWV is present why doesn’t the laying queen have it?

    Today inspected the first 9 hives, all doing good, had stores. Took 12 frames of honey from 4 of the hives, 6 from one, big fat frames (use 9 frames per box) Checkerboarding undrawn frames with drawn this year was weird; in some hives the bees did not draw out the foundation but made really fat frames next to them; in other hives everything was drawn. Needless to say I was surprised at the extra honey it’s been so dry. Now another 9 to go here next nice weather, then another 2 in a small yard about 10 miles away. And they did not forage on clover this year that I could see.
    Proverbs 16:24

  12. #2691
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Sisters, Oregon
    Posts
    304

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Flying kids grabbed a gear. Holy buckets. Now...to get the boyfriend to help put the extractor together.
    I'm smart but at the end of the day I'm still the help.

  13. #2692
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    There is always something going on. 240 lb. of Spring honey in buckets, nearly all supers filled except for one hive. A rebuilding hive has been filling below and brooding up with 40 lbs. of honey above the brood. The hive apparently has no need to move honey up above the QE. Foraging is in a bit of a lull right now ( I think) but we just had some good rain-falls - next seasonal stage coming up. It would seem to be two good years in a row. Now to reduce the RH around here so the bees can finish the honey.

    Meanwhile the bees are active - have not missed one cucurbit flower. Zucchini is incredible, yellow squash coming and every Waltham Butternut's flower has been pollinated so far, cucumbers about to blossom. I have been finding honey bees in all sorts of places - idle time spent exploring? But one must not forget the Bumble Bee as they work my tomato plants. Now to learn about pollination in a high tunnel.

  14. #2693
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    886

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    I am trying to make honey sugar to use in baking. It is taking a long time to dry out in the oven at 170. It is an experiment so I will see how well it works
    3 Hives, Started in 2017, Learning as I go
    My data logger

  15. #2694
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
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    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    " make honey sugar" - why not cream it?

  16. #2695
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    886

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Holcombe View Post
    " make honey sugar" - why not cream it?
    I have been trying to make beer bread with honey instead of white sugar. The first time I did it I mixed in the honey in small drops, it tasted good but it had a funky texture due to the honey not being evenly distributed. Since the carbonation from the beer provides the "rise" and liquid for the bread I can not mix the honey and beer together before combining everything. I have creamed honey, but I don't think it would work any better in this case.

    This is about the recipe that I am using
    https://www.food.com/recipe/beer-bread-73440
    3 Hives, Started in 2017, Learning as I go
    My data logger

  17. #2696
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,597

    Default

    Elmer, the baking powder in that recipe is the leavening agent, not the beer.

  18. #2697
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    886

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Arnie View Post
    Elmer, the baking powder in that recipe is the leavening agent, not the beer.
    hmm, I figured the beer contributed to the levening. Live and learn.
    3 Hives, Started in 2017, Learning as I go
    My data logger

  19. #2698
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Got my first bee sting weed wacking near the hive. She got me right in the leg an I got to say I'm kinda proud of it lol. I think because I've been anticipated it for so long and slightly fearful. I'll give it a 6 out of 10 for pain lol.

  20. #2699
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Adding to this cucurbit pollination observation I realized with my later in the season planting puts the flowering schedule for a lot of my veggies when the Spring flow is ending, a dearth begins but is tempered by the amount of rain here in July going into August. No wonder my veggies garden flowers are visited so well - benefits of a dearth??

  21. #2700
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    578

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    A startling discovery today. Insulated hives are cooler in summer day time conditions and warmer during the night. I have been running my hives with a 24 inch deep insulation sleeve ( part of a year long experiment). The sleeves rise and fall with addition or subtraction of supers - no top vents or other exits besides the bottom. We are in a nice hot spell now. I took off the insulating sleeves a couple of days ago for painting. I put the original galvanize steel covered wooden tops on. I have a canvass sheet for an inner cover, a remote temperature and RH sensor sits on that and surrounded by a 1 1/2 inch spacer - leaving an air gap between the cover and the canvass. I watched the temperature start this morning at 8:00 am with a 79F value, rise to 113F at 1:00pm and drop to 88F by 7:00pm - a 34 degree Fahrenheit swing, peak to peak. With insulation on this hive's sensor location shows warmer nights and apparently very stable cooler days during hot weather - stay stable between 84F to 89F for days on end. This particular hive has 4 supers on. I now can see why the old pospicle stick trick or top vents / exits is used to vent hives in summertime. 113F ambient is getting dangerous for honey bees yet the hive's bottom entrance looked normal from outside. There was some bearding late in the day which has an unusual event this year with the sleeves on.

    Another consideration I have to verify in my next test plan. Hives are stable, not prone to large temeprature swings and cooler during the day in summer. The question is does this help or hurt evaporation rates when bees are preparing honey for capping?

    I am done painting 9 sleeves and they are going back on tomorrow after checking the supers and making up two queen-less nucs.

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