Today in the Apiary - Page 114
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  1. #2261
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    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Thinking on the biology of a queen she usually takes 15 -16 days to emerge.
    Proverbs 16:24

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  3. #2262
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
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    564

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    Thinking on the biology of a queen she usually takes 15 -16 days to emerge.
    Right, However we do not graft with eggs, we graft with Larvae which a 1 day old larvae is a 4 day old from time of egg laying. Also in a split the bees "could" use a fresh egg or they could use a 1.5 day old larvae, egg "hatches" in 3 days, so the 1.5 day old Larvae is 4.5 days from egg laying. I would think if you are grafting "young larvae" you would place the cells in the mating NUC by 11 days after graft or sooner.
    GG

  4. #2263
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    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Hmmm, I don’t graft at all. The biology doesn’t change because you are grafting. That is what I said, 1 day old LARVA, not egg. You know it is day 4 from a newly laid egg, so count back from 15 days. In 11 1/2 days from a grafted one day old larva you’ll have an emerged queen. Whether you graft or leave it be the days are the same from a newly laid egg. Maybe I’m missing something here?
    Proverbs 16:24

  5. #2264
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    Sep 2018
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    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
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    564

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    Hmmm, I don’t graft at all. The biology doesn’t change because you are grafting. That is what I said, 1 day old LARVA, not egg. You know it is day 4 from a newly laid egg, so count back from 15 days. In 11 1/2 days from a grafted one day old larva you’ll have an emerged queen. Whether you graft or leave it be the days are the same from a newly laid egg. Maybe I’m missing something here?
    Cloverdale, I originally commented on a post stating that queens were hatching 11-12 days after grafting and wonder why. no worries we are on the same page.

  6. #2265
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    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Whew!
    Proverbs 16:24

  7. #2266
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,756

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Not technically 'in the apiary". Today I had a chance to hear Kirsten Traynor give a presentation at a special meeting of our bee club. I was very impressed with her knowledge, delivery, and the amount of information she was able to convey in a short period of time. Can't wait for the workshop with her and Zach tomorrow!
    Last edited by JWPalmer; 06-07-2019 at 09:33 PM.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  8. #2267
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    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Not technically 'in the apiary". Today I had a chance to hear Kirsten Traynor give a presentation at a special meeting of our bee club. I was very impressed with her knowledge, delivery, and the amount of information she was able to convey in a short period of time. Can't wait for the workshop with her and Zach tomorrow!
    How was the workshop?
    Proverbs 16:24

  9. #2268
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,756

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Cloverdale View Post
    How was the workshop?
    Deb, it was great. Weather was overcast and she went through a couple of the host's hives, only one was hot and that was because they were queenless. Did a demo on catching queens and attendants and putting them in cages, followed by placing another qc in the mating nuc. Also demonstrated alcohol washes and doing mite counts, including an easy way to collect the bees. Zach gave a really good demo of grafting and I was able to get some pointers for my own attempts, such as grafting from old comb to avoid the tool poking through the bottom of the cell. Only drawback was that there were a lot of new beeks in the group of about 70 and she ended up fielding a bunch of Beekeeping 101 questions and did not have time to get into the creation of starter colonies, something I was interested in. Zach came through after the workshop and answered a few of my specific questions.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  10. #2269
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Richmond, va
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Deb, it was great. Weather was overcast and she went through a couple of the host's hives, only one was hot and that was because they were queenless. Did a demo on catching queens and attendants and putting them in cages, followed by placing another qc in the mating nuc. Also demonstrated alcohol washes and doing mite counts, including an easy way to collect the bees. Zach gave a really good demo of grafting and I was able to get some pointers for my own attempts, such as grafting from old comb to avoid the tool poking through the bottom of the cell. Only drawback was that there were a lot of new beeks in the group of about 70 and she ended up fielding a bunch of Beekeeping 101 questions and did not have time to get into the creation of starter colonies, something I was interested in. Zach came through after the workshop and answered a few of my specific questions.
    Highlight of the demonstration was when we found out that the neighbor called and complained that there was a 'Clan' meeting going on in the field. LOL. Guess there was an awful lot of white hooded attendees

    Bee Club Seminar.jpg

  11. #2270
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Last week I grafted 38 larvae into both JZBZ and Nicot cups and placed them in my nuc cell builder. The grafting itself went very well as I used the maginfiying lamp both to select and pick and then to place them in the cells. Only four were accepted and they were all in the Nicot cups on the top rail. Friday they should have been capped. I pulled the cell bar out today and found that all four cells had been torn down with gaping holes in their sides. Looks like a virgin queen dispatching the competition, but I am certain that no rougue cells emerged prior to this. Will try one last time this July 4th, after that it will be the flyback splits making my queens for me. Whatever queens I have come August will be it for the year. Had hoped to get about 20 nucs made and I still do have a shot at it, but now I am racing the clock.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  12. #2271
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
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    2,082

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    My colonies are working a mesquite bloom and bearding quite a lot. Today, I put a canopy up over the pond closest to them, which they use for a water supply sometimes. Apparently they didn't like the canopy because when I stood under it to feed the fish, with 2 grandchildren, they chased us out. Went to a different small pond, other side of the fence, squished the headbumper bee on my lip between nose and mouth, and got myself stung. I would say today is warm.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  13. #2272
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    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    I had to buy a few queens; checked on them yesterday to see if they were released (it’s been 4 days) and found the queen being balled in one; I had put her on the bars (this was a split done end of May) to see how they reacted to her and it seemed they wanted her so put the cage in. Got her out and away from the bees in the clip. I had just done another split 2 days ago, so I put the clip on the bars of that hive and these bees started balling her! They managed to get into the entrance of the clip, it’s one of the metal ones which I don’t like, and what a mess. We managed to get the bees off of her, then she flew, I caught her in my hands, she fell on the ground, picked her up trying to get her into a cage and she flew again. My question is why did that second hive start balling her too?
    Proverbs 16:24

  14. #2273
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    This Independence Day holiday gave me four wonderfull and very hot days to work in the apiary. Made some summer walk away splits after realizing I did not have the deep resouces to do the fly back splits I had wanted to do.

    Assembled, waxed, and strung 40 deeep frames so far. Repaired and painted my eight feeders and ordered another 12 of the Betterbee Beemax hivetop feeders. The feeders that are already on are empty in a day. 1 gallon of 1:1 per feeder, and poof! it's gone. Started feeding Ultrabee pollen sub and the bees are all over it. Proof that the dearth is really on us in central VA.

    Gave the girls their first OAV treatment of the year. Will check the boards in two days to see what the infestation levels are. No mites after one hour is good, but does not tell a real story.

    Walmart sugar is .10 cheaper than last year at 3.20 for a ten pound bag. Estimate I will need around 1500# this year with the hives and nucs, about double last year's requirements.

    Received my copy of Tom Seeley's book" Honey Bee Democracy" and pretty much read it straight through. Did not care for the last two chapters comparing swarm think and decision making to primate neurology or the New England Town Meetings, but otherwise thoroughly enjoyable reading and very enlightening.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  15. #2274
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    3,142

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    JW,

    Seeley was here in the Bay Area not too long ago. Very good speaker as well as a writer. You should have him come out there to speak at your local club.
    My opinions are based on a decade of beekeeping, book learning and watching YouTube videos.

  16. #2275
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,756

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Charlie, that is a good idea. I will float it by the board. We already managed to get Dr. Sam Ramsey scheduled for August 2020. Very excited about that!
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  17. #2276
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Received the Mike Palmer queens 7/2, made up a dbl nuc, and put one in a newly split hive. All’s well with the hives (I had bought other queens earlier and not one was accepted). The only struggle (somewhat) was getting the attendants out of the cages first. I didn’t do a press in cage because I didn’t think it was needed with these new hives. I am so impressed by his queens. Now age is creeping up on me (just a little bit ) and I’m starting to feel my years; I want to enjoy beekeeping, so next year I’ll go down in hive numbers, 20 is too much now. This is what I said last year too
    Proverbs 16:24

  18. #2277
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,756

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Another sweltering day in the apiary. Made another two walk away splits, one each from hives 1A1 and 1A2. I realized that Hive 1A1 is capable of supporting another three frame split next week as it is absolutely overflowing with bees. This gives me 8 new nucs "cooking" of the 20 total I hope to have by mid August. I have two others that are already established and may end up in 10 frame equipment just to free up the limited 5 frame stuff I have. The summer dearth has shut down brood rearing on the hives I do not have feeders on. Those that do have feeders have a noticable gap in uncapped larvae. It is either eggs or capped brood. Broke out the pollen patties and the bees have eaten about half a pound each in the hives I placed it in. More patty on the way. Let the bees clean up the extractor and was able to get a few close ups of the various color bees I have. At least four distinct coloring groups. Mostly black, black and grey striped, black and yellow striped, and yellow/orange with a black butt. I think the local DCA's are well represented.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  19. #2278
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    Mar 2012
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    Catskills, New York, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Charlie, that is a good idea. I will float it by the board. We already managed to get Dr. Sam Ramsey scheduled for August 2020. Very excited about that!
    That is a good idea! We heard him speak at the Southern Adirondack Beekeepers Assoc. about 2 years ago, he is very approachable and so darn innovative!
    Proverbs 16:24

  20. #2279
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    557

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    My big hive with a data logger on it is going crazy right now. It is gaining about 3 pounds/day right now. I have the stack sitting at 1 deep and 6 mediums, and I need to add another super.

    weight 2017 to jul 2019.jpg weight jul 2019.jpg tall hive july 2019.jpg

  21. #2280
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,756

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Added pollen patties to the nucs and checked the two that were due to have queens by now. One for two on that set. I have been lamenting that my carni/Caucasian mutts have been getting yellower. The returned queen in the one nuc is golden orange. Would pass for an an italian queen any day. The full sized hives with feeders on them are still drawing comb. Found several of the new frames put in when I did the splits to be better than half drawn. Not going to the races, but any comb in a Virginia summer is bonus. I made two more walk away splits, both from swarms caught earlier this year. Next week will be the last week for splits as I will need a good six to eight weeks of brood production before the autumn shut down.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

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