Today in the Apiary - Page 125
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  1. #2481
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    Apr 2020
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    Gerald, Mo. USA
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    33

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariahk
    I really am not proud of this but as your the only people who will hopefully laugh with me here it goes... I was out by the hives in the evening watering my plants, my dog was wondering around A
    and somehow tripped me causing me to bang into a hive hard, of coarse it had to be the the pissy hive. **** things shot out like angry rockets which caused me to run for cover. I could feel a sting on my arm during my retreat. And hear them on the back of my shirt, which half way across the back yard I ditched, and ran into the house topless much to my daughters enjoyment, they watched the whole scene, and were on the floor laughing. I only got one sting and so did the dog, on his nose. But after I suited up to make sure I didn't topple anything and retrieve my shirt. I found the hive was ok, my shirt had at least 6 angry bees in it. I don't think a single member of my family will let me live it down and my husband just laughed and said "you wanted bees"
    Really enjoying the mental image! My family and spouse would react exactly the same way. Glad you didn't hurt anything more than your pride!

    (This note was in reply to an old posting about a member accidentally falling against a pissy hive, and having to shed her shirt as she ran to her house, much to her family's delight. Once I realized how old that posting was, I wanted to delete my response, but couldn't figure out how. Maybe someone could enlighten me on how to do that.)
    Last edited by JWPalmer; 04-03-2020 at 04:00 AM. Reason: Edit to include quote from 2015

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  3. #2482
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    5,013

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    You can edit your post by removing all the words and then type "deleted". A moderator will then remove the posting. In this case, I would like to see the story as I do not recall having read it. What was the post number?
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  4. #2483
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    Apr 2020
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    Gerald, Mo. USA
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    33

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Hi JW;

    Thanks for the clarification on how to delete! That funny story was on Post #19 in this thread. It was my first time to explore the forum, and I guess the default is to display linear, starting with the oldest, so this one was from I think 2012. Well worth your going back and reading it!

    I've gone into my settings, and changed the display to linear, newest first, so maybe I'll be a little more timely next time I comment on something. LOL

  5. #2484
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    I edited your post to include the original post. Truly a funny story and I am glad Mariah shared it with us.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  6. #2485
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    After a cloudy and generally yucky day yesterday, today was almost picture perfect. Finished swaping around my supers, shaking bees off the ones with brood, and got the last three queen excluders installed. Sold a nuc that was the swarm I caught two weeks ago. Before anyone jumps me, it was a queen I had sold last year and in the two weeks since being hived had layed up 4-1/2 frames of brood, all tightly packed. The purchaser was aware of the history. The nuc i had planned to sell was not of good enough quality as there were far to many drone cells mixed in and I am thinking the queen may be going drone layer. Tight pattern though. Made another split to accommodate the returning foragers and added a queen cell to a split that did not make one of their own and had become hopelessly queenless. Fed the nucs and smoked a cigar while watching the girls bringing in a ton of pollen. Another good day.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  7. #2486
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    Jun 2018
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    Boaz, KY, USA
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    1,942

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Fed the nucs and smoked a cigar while watching the girls bringing in a ton of pollen. Another good day.
    Add a cool beverage to the equation and it sounds like real living to me.
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  8. #2487
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    Apr 2017
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    The cool beverges came later while watching the wife fire up the riding mower and cut the grass. And I smoked another cigar in the process.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  9. #2488
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    Jun 2018
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    Boaz, KY, USA
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    1,942

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    The cool beverges came later while watching the wife fire up the riding mower and cut the grass. And I smoked another cigar in the process.
    Well now you are just rubbing it in...
    Ecclesiastes 11:4

  10. #2489
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    Jan 2014
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    Louisville, Colorado, USA
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    1,584

    Default

    JW, you inspired me to fire up a stogie and watch the bees bring in pollen! I haven't been smoking lately. Good fun.

    Checked 10 hives today. Most are between good and booming.
    One has a failed queen. Another was a little weakish. Gave that one a couple frames of capped brood.
    Reversed hive bodies on a few.
    Will check the other 12 tomorrow.

  11. #2490
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    Apr 2020
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    Gerald, Mo. USA
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    33

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Well, the weatherman gave us hope a couple of days ago for a 66 deg. day today, so we planned on a full inspection, marking the queen, and possibly a split of my one hive. Unfortunately, it never got above 50 deg., was damp and overcast, so discretion being the better part of valor, we ended up calling the whole thing off, and will try again on Wednesday. The girls were flying, but not with a lot of enthusiasm.

  12. #2491
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    Jun 2015
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    Litchfield, Ct, USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Installed 2 five frame nucs into 2, 10 frame deeps. Drove 2 hours to Betterbee and 2 hours back. Nucs looked strong. Unfortunately didn't see either queen, though saw eggs and such in both nucs. I'm not good at finding queens, and not sure if they were marked. I didn't want to spend a lot of time inspecting as it was maybe 50 at the most and cloudy.

  13. #2492
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    Apr 2020
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    Gerald, Mo. USA
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Well, we weren't able to do the inspection on the 5th as noted below. We were able to do it today though. We found the queen and marked her. She is big and beautiful! We also found no small hive beetles, and no evidence of mites or any diseases. My new friend was very impressed with my hive - two deep brood boxes and a medium super being drawn out nicely, all chock full of bees, and with lots of brood in both deeps.

    Anticipating the possibility of doing a split, he had brought me another mated queen. We set up the new queen in a new deep with a good portion of the stores, brood, and bees, and then we found a frame with eggs in the cells, and set that up a nuc box with more brood, bees, and stores, with the hope that these bees will make a new queen of their own, to graduate me up from one hive to three if the nuc experiment is successful. We'll find out in 10 days if we're going to be successful with that one.

    So now I've got the original hive and queen in just one deep with the medium super back on, a new single deep hive with a new caged queen in it, and a five frame nuc with everything they should need to make themselves a new queen for that colony. Great fun, extremely educational, and I'm totally exhausted now after a long 90 deg. F day.

    This weekend I'll be working on a stand for these hives, then more supers and more frames. In between, I'll be hanging a Screech Owl nesting box and painting and hanging a bat nursery box.
    I need to go back to work. This being retired is working me too hard!

  14. #2493
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    Mar 2015
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    St Louis, Missouri, USA
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    383

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelCfffg View Post
    I'll be hanging a Screech Owl nesting box and painting and hanging a bat nursery box.
    Nice job! This is my favorite part. I always like when beeks do a bit extra to help other species, whether it's bats, owls, wood ducks, native bees, or whatever. For one thing, it's the right thing to do and improves the ecosystem around our bee yards. But it also helps counter some of the "honey bees are destroying the environment" arguments.

  15. #2494
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    Dec 2019
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    SE Michigan USDA 6a (Macomb Co.)
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    101

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Arthur View Post
    Nice job! This is my favorite part. I always like when beeks do a bit extra to help other species, whether it's bats, owls, wood ducks, native bees, or whatever. For one thing, it's the right thing to do and improves the ecosystem around our bee yards. But it also helps counter some of the "honey bees are destroying the environment" arguments.
    Wow, this is a new one for me. "Honey bees are destroying the environment"? Sounds like a bunch of garbage to me, without our bees there would be catastrophe. Before I started keeping bees here I literally NEVER saw a single honey been in my yard. Now, all my flowers, fruits, and veggies are MUCH more productive, so I sure there has been a great improvement, and not just for me, but for as far as my girls are flying. What is the "bad for the environment argument"? We are now able to grow too much food and we are depleting the ground nutrients excessively?

    Just the act of keeping bees demands a number of environmentally friendly habits, aside from the bees themselves. Limiting pesticides, planting more drought tolerance crops and flowers, providing more abundant water, improving soil conditions, spending more time outdoors, etc, all that stuff seems to provide beneficial effects to the environment AND humans, not damage.

    Finally though, I think that most of us don't do it just for the hope of a huge payday from selling honey LOL. We are trying to do our part to help make up for some of the slackers out there filling up the landfills and dumping who-knows-what. I know for instance that I've seen a huge increase in monarch butterflies (hopefully due to trying to leave more milkweed alone, and planting more butterfly-friendly stuff like trumpet vine, bee balm, wisteria vine, daffodils, lilac, etc) and lots more mason bees (now nesting in all those "cut bamboo" sort of boxes I put up). I already have plans for bat houses, so I'll have several of those by the end of the season too if all goes to plan. Looks like I'm going to have to look for plans for those screech owl boxes though too, now that I don't have any guineas to worry about. Hawks or owls + guineas = eventually a big pile of white feathers lol.
    USDA 6a, 8 frame equipment

  16. #2495
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    Mar 2015
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    St Louis, Missouri, USA
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    383

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyfan_019 View Post
    Wow, this is a new one for me. "Honey bees are destroying the environment"?
    Here's an example of their arguments: https://theconversation.com/keeping-...txdl_6h7SxtEME

    I follow a facebook page that routinely advocates for removal of honey bees from the landscape. They argue that honey bees outcompete native bees for limited resources, and that honey bees spread diseases and pests to native species. On the rare occasions that I comment on their posts, I try to remind them that they should view beekeepers as allies and that most of us have the same goals they do (protect wild habitat and establish new pollinator-friendly habiltat, for instance). That being said (here's where I get into trouble), their arguments do hold some water when you look at huge commercial beekeeping operations. I can understand how having an enormous concentration of honey bees in one area could do harm to native pollinators. So I'm sympathetic to their cause, though I like to think a vast majority of us beekeepers are doing more good than harm.

  17. #2496
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    Dec 2019
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    SE Michigan USDA 6a (Macomb Co.)
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Arthur View Post
    Here's an example of their arguments: https://theconversation.com/keeping-...txdl_6h7SxtEME

    I follow a facebook page that routinely advocates for removal of honey bees from the landscape. They argue that honey bees outcompete native bees for limited resources, and that honey bees spread diseases and pests to native species. On the rare occasions that I comment on their posts, I try to remind them that they should view beekeepers as allies and that most of us have the same goals they do (protect wild habitat and establish new pollinator-friendly habiltat, for instance). That being said (here's where I get into trouble), their arguments do hold some water when you look at huge commercial beekeeping operations. I can understand how having an enormous concentration of honey bees in one area could do harm to native pollinators. So I'm sympathetic to their cause, though I like to think a vast majority of us beekeepers are doing more good than harm.
    Thanks for the great explanation. Given a "huge" bee-yard operation I can see that there could be some negative effects on local area, but likely still an overall positive. Especially if the bees were all being moved place-to-place for the purpose of various crop pollination tasks. But, if people were really concerned about the environment, they'd look at industries like big-pork or big-chicken production. If you have had any experience with these industries (of even just live near one) you'd know what I'm talking about...
    USDA 6a, 8 frame equipment

  18. #2497
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Virginia is a huge producer of chickens, turkeys, and pork products. I know exactly what you are talking about. Tyson even has a processing plant just outside Richmond, yuck.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  19. #2498
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    Aug 2015
    Location
    asheville, north carolina, USA
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    Default

    Checked on the bees today. Nucs are doing satisfactory. One booming hive was bearding this morning which is unusual because it was only 49 degrees. When it warmed up to the mid 50's I opened it up. No signs of swarming but was very full of bees and brood. I checker boarded the 2nd brood box (medium) . It already had 1 deep and two mediums mostly full of brood. I know it is frowned upon to checker board the brood chamber instead of above it but it was so full and needed something done quick.
    Also was marking queens with my one handed queen catcher. One queen I missed catching her twice. She was running along the comb fairly quick and she flew from the comb back to the box a couple of feet away twice. This queen is fat and laying. Has anyone seen a mated queen run quick and fly any distance at all when they are not in swarm mode. This is a recently mated queen.

  20. #2499
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    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
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    290

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    I just don't learn. Went to "quickly" put on pail feeders on the two new hives without protection. A sting to the neck and hand later I abandoned the bucket with several bees buzzing my head on my way back to the house. They are not happy today.

  21. #2500
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Decorah, Iowa USA
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    272

    Default Re: Today in the Apiary

    Sat. put pkgs in with 55 degrees. This morning inch of snow and 24 degrees. Have got frames of honey on both sides of 2 drawn combs in all the hives. Sounds like a couple more days before warm up. Sooner the better!
    Jerry

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