Queen breeding question
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bozeman Montana
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    489

    Default Queen breeding question

    How do those who rear queens insure the genetics of the drones that will mate with their queens ? Short of artificial insemination , aren't you at the mercy of what' drones are flying? Also are drones from the same queen going to mate with those if they can and if so , is it inbreeding like with other animals? Sorry Iam new and i really love the bees I have and I want more ,but forgive me, I would rather not chance it on feral bees. Thanks for your replies in advance charlie

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    Why not try it out to see for yourself?
    Put in some time to learn what is right for your local environment. What do you have to lose?
    At least find out what bee genetic is available in your area, right. Over here I found out that there is
    a high 90% concentration of carnis vs the Italians/Cordovans that I keep. So if one day I like to keep the carnis it will
    be a perfect combination. Besides, the genetic diversity is enough for my queen raising and selection process. I get
    to pick the bees that I like to keep. Isn't that enough fun for trying it out?
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
    Posts
    1,623

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    I have read of some queen breeders who will have drone hives that flood the area with the desirable drones.I can see how this would work as also any feral hive queens will mate with their desirable drones also creating the whole area having pretty well the same stock as the queen breeder.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Madisonville,TN
    Posts
    535

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    My mating nucs are near my strong colonies. Not in the same yard, but near them. The hives are foundationless, so I have more drones than most, which is what I want. The hope is, that they will mate with these drones. Does this mean it will happen every time? Gosh No. There is no way I can be for sure that another drone from someone's hive or a feral drone is not sneaking in there, but for the most part, I believe my queens are mating with the drones from my hives. I keep records about what queen came from where, so when I breed queens, I move their mating nucs, away from their home yard, so it lessens the chance of in breeding.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinchecharlie View Post
    Also are drones from the same queen going to mate with those if they can and if so , is it inbreeding like with other animals?
    Honey Bees are adept at "gene recombination" which basically means that the queen will lay eggs with the same genes but different gene sequences, resulting in drones with varying traits. So yes, it is inbreeding but not exactly like other livestock. The possibility of an undesirable quality being passed on is at least as great as that of a desirable one. So it stands to reason that more, different genes will offer more possibilities in the sequences obtained.
    And yes, your queens will likely breed with the feral population in your area, whether you think it's a good idea or not.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Laurel Hill, Fl
    Posts
    1,120

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt903 View Post
    , I move their mating nucs, away from their home yard, so it lessens the chance of in breeding.
    That may not be a good plan, I've read that queens will fly nearly twice as far as drones will, to insure they are not inbreeding. If you move your nucs a mile, you may have moved it far enough to allow her to find her own drones. Now if you are moving them 4+ miles, not a problem.... That's beyond the range of both, even if they flew straight at each other.
    Robbin NW Florida(8A) / 14 hives / 5 Nucs / 6th Year / T {OAV & MMK}

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,512

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    As Robbin indicated. Queens from a given hive/yard will fly past their hive/yard's DCA's to prevent inbreeding. Nature favours diversity. Of course in an isolated mating situation they will mate with drones from their own yard.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    I don't know how the queen can fly pass her own DCA to another DCA without being intercepted by her own drones.
    In south Am. the way to keep the AHB out is to encircle the mating area with the EHB's drones.
    Every time the virgin try to fly out she is being greeted by the non aggressive drones.
    Maybe every virgin that try to get to another DCA know how to evade her own DCA. Two days after the virgin got
    released from her balling she got mated. Too bad those are not my own drones but the neighbor's.
    I'm not sure how she does it, do you?
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Buderim, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    255

    Default Re: Queen breeding question

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinchecharlie View Post
    How do those who rear queens insure the genetics of the drones that will mate with their queens ? Short of artificial insemination , aren't you at the mercy of what' drones are flying? Also are drones from the same queen going to mate with those if they can and if so , is it inbreeding like with other animals? Sorry Iam new and i really love the bees I have and I want more ,but forgive me, I would rather not chance it on feral bees. Thanks for your replies in advance charlie
    Charlie, this is a short video showing how an Australian does controlled mating with his own queens and drones. He is the breeder of the breeder queens over here. He keeps his hives in the dark during the day and only runs them out on his mini train tracks late afternoon after other drones in his area have stopped flying for the day.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YPW1tmBjoQ0

    We also have another breeder of Caucasians who mates his queens on an island.

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