Successful Queen Introduction tips. - Page 4
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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ridgeville, SC, USA
    Posts
    556

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Harry it has been 10 days. I have followed your introduction tips to a T. I checked hive today and the queen has been released and is laying like crazy. I found her on a frame while reversing frames with the dent. I went ahead and marked her. This is a result of good information put to good use. Thanks very much, Robert

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  3. #62
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Knoxville, Tennessee USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Welp, I must have done something wrong. Had a laying worker nuc and added two frames of mixed brood (some open, some capped) and placed a new caged queen between the frames and came back 10 days later to find no queen. She had been released but there is no sign of a laying queen. The colony did however build 3 queen cells on one of the frames that I added, so all may not be lost. Apparently, there were eggs and/or larvae of appropriate age to build queen cells and they were more interested in raising their own queen? We'll see what happens with these queen cells...!
    4th year - 8 hives

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    42

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    My hive has been taken over by a worker laying eggs. I have lots of drones capped. I am having a new queen shipped this week. Is it worth trying to add her in to see if they will accept her? This is our first hive btw. Start day was March 25th. I think the queen died at the beginning.

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,861

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    My experience with the LWs so far is that they
    will not accept a new queen because they're thinking that
    they have a queen in there already. You can risk it but I think
    this new queen is doom for sure.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    1,136

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Harry, thanks again for this post. After reading it on 5/26/15 I split 5 hives with purchased queens. I opened then today for the first time and all 5 are accepted and laying. Fixing a little wonky comb is far better than queens that never got accepted and lost hives.

  7. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    North Okanagan BC Canada
    Posts
    274

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Hi , I read the post with great interest, but one thing I could not find so a question. I have three local queens picked up this afternoon, they were just caged and have attendants with them. Should I remove the attendants or can I leave them in ?

    thanks

  8. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Santa barbara, CA
    Posts
    779

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Leave them in, say I.
    If you only have a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.
    Abraham Maslow

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,518

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Great info. Thanks.

  10. #69
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Lexington, SC, USA
    Posts
    481

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    4 splits + 10 days= successful queen intro. Hey! I'm 100% for the moment.

    Thanks for the advice.

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,518

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Re-queened two hives this morning using the Vanderpool Method.

    I plan to go back for a look-see on the 5th. Will report back then.

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Louisville, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,518

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Checked and both queens accepted and laying. 2 for 2. Thanks, Harry.

  13. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ridgeville, SC, USA
    Posts
    556

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    7 for 7 another high five..

  14. #73
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Richardson, TX, USA
    Posts
    378

    Default Re: Successful Queen Introduction tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryVanderpool View Post

    Every year I shake packages for myself to start brand new hives.
    Last weekend I queen-checked 32 hives that started as packages on April 5th.
    After installing packages, I only returned to the hives on multiple times to quietly slide the lid aside and fill feeders.
    ALL of the queens were accepted.
    They were accepted using the time honored candy, time-release method and most important; NO DISRUPTION for the initial period.

    Ever heard of K.I.S.S.? That stands for "Keep it simple stupid!

    I hope that those of you that have been bamboozled by the cockamamie, monkey-motion procedures outlined in "the books" will try our procedure next time.
    And I am open for any questions.
    Harry, I have a couple of Buckfast queens coming from R Weaver in early April that I want to install in a couple of packages I am going to shake from my bees like you've mentioned above that you do. I'd originally planned on shaking those into a 5-frame nuc that would have a top feeder on it and foundation in the remaining combs along with all the bees from two frames of brood out of one of my production hives but not the actual brood itself. Then, I plan on hanging the queen in her cage, candy down, without doing anything to the cage, close up the hive entrance for 24 hours only, and then check back again in 10 days. Am I using the correct amount of bees? more? less? Any comments?

    Here, in April, the bees are bringing in nectar and pollen.

  15. #74
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,512

    Default Re: Successful Queen Introduction tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by RichardsonTX View Post
    Am I using the correct amount of bees? more? less? Any comments?
    That's not really enough bees. If the nights are warm, I would go with a frame of feed, a frame of brood with attached bees and an extra shake of bees. I wouldn't close them up, but you will want to move them another yard.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  16. #75
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Successful Queen Introduction tips.

    Harry,

    I was recently shown a queen introduction tool that was new to me. Basically it was a western frame with screen on both sides of the frame. The idea is that with a greater surface area of screen, the bees would have greater access to the new queen and therefore the success rate would be high. Any experience with this? Dies it make sense to you?

    Morris

  17. #76
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Rulison, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Successful Queen Introduction tips.

    I wish I saw this post sooner!!!

    Last year, was my first year re-queening and making 6 splits.

    I do not have a mentor, nor can I find one; so I had to read how to re-queen and make splits in books and magazines.

    So I did as the books and magazines said, and made sure that the queens where released within 3-days (as recommended ), and they were; but when I made my first inspection 7-days later (again as recommended by the books and magazines). only 1-of the 6 splits had a queen. Luckily, I was able to get 5-more queens within a couple days, and re-queened them. This time, I put some masking tape over the candy-end to slow them down on releasing the queens, and left them alone. When I finally checked them (couple weeks later) all queens were accounted for, and laying like crazy.

    This year, I did the same thing. I made 10-splits. When I made the splits, I left them queenless for ~30 hours before adding the queens; at which time I added masking tape to the candy-end to help slow the release of the queens. It will be next weekend at the soonest, before I will check to see if they have been excepted. I don't know if using masking tape is a good idea or not?? It's the only thing I could think of to help slowdown the release of the queens.

    I will do an update after my first inspection, and let you know if I was successful, or not.

  18. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Dane County, WI
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Successful Queen Introduction tips.

    Harry,

    I have read and followed the advice in this excellent thread. Question. Have you ever introduced Russian queens into your apiary and did you do anything different from your advice in this thread? Thanks.

  19. #78
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Penobscot County, ME, USA
    Posts
    1,206

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy Hodge View Post
    Welp, I must have done something wrong...added two frames of mixed brood (some open, some capped) and placed a new caged queen between the frames and came back 10 days later to find no queen. She had been released but there is no sign of a laying queen. The colony did however build 3 queen cells on one of the frames that I added, so all may not be lost. Apparently, there were eggs and/or larvae of appropriate age to build queen cells and they were more interested in raising their own queen? We'll see what happens with these queen cells...!
    After 5 years of having zero issues with getting queens accepted I just had the same thing happen with a hive and a nuc. Carni queens, added brood and bees, left cages in for 24hrs before putting candy in. Next day, bees seemed to have no issues with the queens so corks swapped for candy plugs and they were left alone...was only going to be 3 days but weather and other things didn't work out so it was nearly 10 days later before checking.

    Queens had been released but there was no sign of them, and both had a capped queen cell. Bahfungoo. The brood I added came from my Russian hives and I don't want or need any more Russians- I need more Carnis and Italians.
    If you want to be successful, study successful people and do what they do.
    Zone 4a/b

  20. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Deerfield, MA USA
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Successful Queen Introduction tips.

    [EDIT: Disregard this message; I see it has been answered. I can't for the life of me figure out how to delete this post! Moderator, please delete this.]
    Harry, do you have more specific tips for a laying worker hive? I am trying to introduce a queen along with a frame of mostly capped worker brood from a healthy hive. The queen is just in a small cage. I gather that with enough brood pheromone, the workers knock off the laying and will become more accepting of a queen. I'm not super hopeful that this queen makes it, but if they kill her I will just keep swapping in new brood until it looks like they are raising a queen or giving it up. Or should *I* just give it up? I have a swarm trap almost ready to go, so maybe it makes more sense to try and catch a new colony.

    Thanks for your help!
    Last edited by Camofrog; 05-28-2016 at 10:00 PM.

  21. #80
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Sucsessful Queen Introduction tips.

    I have a hive box with bees that have been queenless for two weeks. I have no brood resources, no other hives nothing. I have a frame with a caged area holding a piece of 5" by 7" empty drawn comb. The weather is very hot today (117 degrees F). this evening I can get the backyard down to 100 F by watering. My plan is to put some honey and pollen into the comb release the queen and her attendants into the caged area, place the frame into the hive. Then I will wait until night seal the entrance and bring the hive into a 85 degree F room and feed the bees sugar water, protein paddys, and water. The temperature is expected to be 110 plus for the forseeable future outside. If I see any evidence of laying workers I will remove all of their comb saved during the cutout and let them start anew so they can't lay. Only the new queen will be able to lay on her empty drawn comb. I am new to beekeeping and have zero brood resources. This is my only hive. Update: I was hoping for some feedback, but I thought it was a bad idea to delay the re-queening. The queen came from Pendel out of California. I was hoping to get a queen out of New Mexico, but that fell through. I received a queen with attendants. The temperature was 119 today in Phoenix, so I waited until late in the day. I cleaned and modified the SBB and slatted rack. The good news is the covered brood that I saved from the cutout emerged so many of my bees are young. Two of the frames were removed; my friend who was a great help generally mounted the cutout comb upside down in the two frames, but the brood hatched anyway. Most of the work happened at night and the bees were hanging on things around the light. I moved the light over the hive and shook the clinging bees off of things where they were light worshiping. That brought all the bees to the hive. Soon I was able to turn out the light once they settled on the hive. The bees are now in protective custody, 85 degrees, and I'm feeding them sugar water, Dadant protein paddies, and water with a mineral supplement. Last I saw them before I placed the inner cover, the bees were mostly gathered around the queen cage frame. They are much quieter than they used to be. Next week I will open the sealed hive and probably release the queen.
    Last edited by One in Three; 06-20-2016 at 02:41 AM. Reason: correction

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