Decided on a Warre Hive - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 55
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,814

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    I have now started nine Warres for other people and one for myself after getting about 42 years experience with Langstroth hives and operating over 100 of them. I only started one for myself because I won it here on Beesource as a raffle prize. The advantages and benefits between the two is crystal clear to me.

    It was a surprise to me that Bernard promoted "Warre" hives but primarily publishes pictures of "Warre" hives with frames. I would imagine that most of the participants in Beesource are Americans, few even know what a Warre hive is, and that those who do, consider a Warre hive to be a TOPBAR hive. The only Warre hives with frames marketed here in the USA that I know of, are clearing sold as a different entity, a Modified Warre hive. I would imagine that the percentage of Warre hives with frames in the USA is very small. To me a Warre hive with frames is just a miniature Langstroth with a deceptive name. The management of a topbar hive and a framed hive is very different. As we discuss the benefits and problems with Warre hives, lets be very clear if we are talking about a topbar Warre or a framed Warre.
    I would think that the problems Honey for All's package purchasers have had were because of the difference in management between a framed and topbar hives. Also, most beginners accepting the dogma of a Warre hive are also treatment free, possibly leading to greater losses for Honey-For-All's customers. I would not called a topbar Warre "Rube Goldberg", I would call it old fashioned, lacking in the ease of management that a framed hive gives us.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    Especially with a package, where a lot of bees will die before time, you need to install them on one box. I hive any sort of swarm on one box only, and that is beneficial for the bees.

    Also advise them to use one box for the start, let them feed those packages and tell them they need to inspect the hives. A package is no natural swarm and needs to be treated differently. Maybe some instructions can be included with your packages. If you want I can make a flyer or something, that you can print out and add to your packages.
    I have a few questions, the statement about a package needing to be treated differently than a natural swarm makes sense. I ordered bees that wouldn't have to travel a great distance, however; the package will be traveling just the same. That alone has me a bit tense, as I would imagine the bees would be a bit stressed on arrival. (I saw the postage route scene in "More Than Honey".... interesting). I would have loved to ordered bees within my state, but I for one reason or another, simply could not make the pick up dates. I also reached out to a few beekeepers, but my experience so far is they have been a bit stand-offish. The next beekeeper meeting is Wednesday, so I'm hoping to meet somebody that is interested in mentoring.

    Since I'm getting packaged bees, how often should I feed once hived? I'm finding varying answers to the question, but those have been from manuals. After hiving the bees, how long to leave then alone before checking on them? A week? 2 Weeks? this seems to differ from manual and even from suggestions here on the forum. I picked the Warre for a few reasons, and I don't plan to harvest honey this year, since its my first year, I just want to get the basics down first. What in the world does teeter totter mean in reference to Warre hives? Are they really that unstable? I would think if they were, people wouldn't use them. My Warre hive is foundationless, so which do bees form comb on the fastest, with or without foundation? Can packaged bees turn out to be a "hot hive", or is this only with feral bees? I've read a few places that a cheese or piano wire is best for separating Warre boxes... wouldn't one run the risk of slicing bees, namely the queen in half? Why only one box to hive to start? I'm curious to know your reasoning.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,814

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    >Re: Impressions on beekeeping with a Warré or Gatineau hive - It is a Warré hive with frames and a different lid. That's it. Needed a different roof when I started migrating. Also frames were necessary to work more hives in less time. Strictly spoken it is not a Warré hive, but that's only for the nitpickers. For me the dimensions are the key element.>

    We have parallel threads running. I am glad to see that a distinction between topbar and framed Warre hives is being made. To me it is not nitpicking. Would we be clear on what is going on in the Mideast if we confused Muslims, Catholics, Buddhists and Jewish? The name you give the item you are discussing is very important. There is a HUGE difference between a topbar Warre hive and a framed Gatineau hive.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    I chose a Warré hive for my first bee experience for the worst possible reason: aesthetics. I just really liked the geometry of the tall thin hive and it was a chance to put my workworking skills to good use (not that the ladies care one bit.) Here's a couple pics of the bodies and base and the roof.

    2015-02-28 22.43.43.jpg

    2015-03-05 20.59.34.jpg

    All that said, I have been super happy and the bees are doing great. I went frameless and they've been drawing out comb and socking away pollen like champs. So I'm sure your 5 lbs of bees will do great in your new hive.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,814

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    >aesthetics

    Everyone who sees a Warre says they are "cute".

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Quote Originally Posted by lamarcarama View Post
    I chose a Warré hive for my first bee experience for the worst possible reason: aesthetics. I just really liked the geometry of the tall thin hive and it was a chance to put my workworking skills to good use (not that the ladies care one bit.) All that said, I have been super happy and the bees are doing great. I went frameless and they've been drawing out comb and socking away pollen like champs. So I'm sure your 5 lbs of bees will do great in your new hive.

    I picked the Warre hive, because the boxes are lighter to lift as well as the hive being smaller, family members didn't want a large hive, and my main purpose for beekeeping is to provide the area with pollinators as well as studying bees first hand. Honey is a second reason, but I'm not sure if I will harvest any this first year, plus I am partial to comb honey. Since it will be me beekeeping alone, I wanted supers I could actually lift.

  8. #27

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    There is a HUGE difference between a topbar Warre hive and a framed Gatineau hive.
    Which is? Significantly?

    Watch out, thrifty beeekeepers ask things they already know, to test the opponent's knowledge.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,913

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    >Since it will be me beekeeping alone, I wanted supers I could actually lift.

    Which is why I went to eight frame medium Langstroths...

    Any size package will likely do fine. 2lb. 3lb. Anything more is probably a waste of your money but they will likely do fine as well. Start with one box. Add the next when that one is 80% full.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  10. #29
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,814

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    Which is? Significantly?Watch out, thrifty beekeepers ask things they already know, to test the opponent's knowledge.
    You said so yourself: "Re: Impressions on beekeeping with a Warré or Gatineau hive - It is a Warré hive with frames and a different lid. That's it. Needed a different roof when I started migrating. Also frames were necessary to work more hives in less time. Strictly spoken it is not a Warré hive, but that's only for the nitpickers. For me the dimensions are the key element."

    What dimensions do you feel are the key element? I have had great success with much wider Brother Adam hives and 10 frame Langstroths.


  11. #30

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    So, no significant differences. Thanks.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    MY BEEHIVE IS HERE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! *goes to start assembling Warre hive* For the guys I met in the chat last night... You're Awesome!

  13. #32
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vernon, AZ. USA
    Posts
    627

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    You will find, as you work Warre hives, that it is very easy to maintain beespace within the box. You will see and hear of the " maintenence" in Lang hives. Much of it consists of scraping the frames to maintain the 3/8" OR 9-10 mm spacing. This is greatly eased in a W. hive. You'll see a solid laying pattern, wall to wall brood. Even a 1 mm shrinkage or widening will make a difference. Very slightly under, and the bees like it.The slightest increase in distance between the frames , past the ideal, and the queen will not lay in the deeper cells the workers construct. So you see less new brood and slow/ declining hives. Mssr. Warre was -very- experienced. The original dimensions support that, and bees thrive in those hives. GOOD LUCK! Learn beekeeping, it's not the hive, it's your beekeeping knowledge that will give you sucess.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Ok, I'll jump into the fray.
    Intlgrrl, two years ago I built 4 Warres from plans I downloaded from the website Biobees.com (you'd have to do some searching, but the link is there). Biobees.com is a website out of England that is pretty much devoted to Warre hive owners and horizontal top bar hives. Way too much to explain here but that website is a goldmine of info regarding Warres. On this website Bernhard Heuvel is the go to guy for Warre info.
    Back to two years ago---I added a 3lb package with marked queen to a two box Warre. Hung the queen cage from one of the top bars after pushing a small nail thru the candy to create a "thru hole". Might not be necessary but I did anyway. Closed it up and left it alone for 4 days. Opened the hive by taking roof/quilt/mosquito netting under quilt off---found empty queen cage. Closed the hive up except this time i installed a feeder (quart jar) on top of the middle top bars. Fed the girls until THEY QUIT TAKING THE FEED (about 3 weeks), then removed the feeder and reinstalled the quilt on top of the netting/roof. They built comb, more comb, moved down to the second box, filled that one 80% full, then I added a 3rd box which they filled half way with comb then stopped as fall set in. I didn't take any honey the first year.
    Got the hive through winter/spring, had to add 4th box which they filled 80%. Added the 5th and they never moved down to the 5th. Out of one box last year I got 23 lbs honey (topmost box). The Warre hive does need inspection and management just like Langstroth hives do.
    Get your hive built first, watch installation videos

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Watch installation videos at TheWarrestore.com, and read,read,read at Biobees.com. And I suggest also reading David Heafs' book "Natural Beekeeping with the Warre Hive--a manual".
    An excellent book for us "Warreors".
    Best wishes and luck on your new adventure,
    Gunther

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Thanks for the advice! The hive is assembled and oil treated... the bees arrive next week. Way excited. I'm guessing a weekend installation.

  17. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Elgin, South Carolina
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    I think you made a good choice, I believe it mimics a bee tree. Been exploring the idea of building a slightly modified Warre Hive, it will still be square but just a tad larger, I interpret bee space slightly different. The original plans call for 13 5/16 square but I am going to build 13 3/4 square will be 12 1/4 inside measurements. That is only 7/16 larger each direction. I will be using 8 top bars 1 1/4 inch and 1/4 inch bee space. Using 7 1/4 boards versus 8 9/32 in height. that will be 1 1/32 shorter in height.

  18. #37
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Vernon, AZ. USA
    Posts
    627

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    As long as the total of the bars and the gap remains 1 3/8" or less you can make them longer. In KTBH they are 1 3/8" wide and (usually) 17" long. I've used 1 1/4" for smaller wild bees and they thrive. I use the original metric dimensions and.... now my boxes fit all the standard Warre hives.

  19. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Can you take a picture of the end result? I would like to see how it turns out. What wood are you going to use?

  20. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Hi Houston,
    I've taken a look at Biobees.com, and its a pretty informative site, I even printed Warre's book as well and I'm working my way through it. As far as feeding the bees, since I have one hive, would it be okay to use an outside feeder? I have assembled my hive and it turned out fine. I purchased a hive, since I have no building skills, and finished it with oil, turned out nice. I've been watching all sorts of installation videos and they have been helpful. I just hope the bees accept the hive. they're coming next week.

  21. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Elgin, South Carolina
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Decided on a Warre Hive

    Quote Originally Posted by intlgrrl View Post
    Can you take a picture of the end result? I would like to see how it turns out. What wood are you going to use?
    Will be using pine wood will start with two boxes a quilt and a roof. I have feral bees a swarm from a bee tree at the present they are in a top bar hive very gentle easy to work no smoke no gloves but I do wear a veil. Do not think it is necessary but I wear it any way. Not fully satisfied with a horizontal top bar hive. So looking for an alternative more like a bee tree and think Warre will fit that description.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •