Hypothehtical question about queenless colony
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Excel, ALabama, USA
    Posts
    40

    Default Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    If a queen was pulled from a colony, introduced to queenless colony , left for several days to lay some eggs, and reintroduced her to her original colony what would be the percentage of her being re accepted? Just something I thought of. Could it work?
    Last edited by kbar1973; 05-07-2015 at 04:19 AM.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,713

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    After several days, most likely zero. It would probably be better & simpler to "borrow" a frame of eggs, as suggested by Michael Bush.
    After 40 years of beekeeping, I've come to realize that the bees can fix most of my mistakes.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Auburn, Washington, USA
    Posts
    325

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    If you move her on three frames with bees from the second hive back to the original probably very high that it will go without a hitch. But you would need to worry about queen cells and potential for a virgin killing the laying queen if you do this jockeying back and forth one too many times.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ, USA
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    Seven days can be too long, I don't think she can be accepted back. I haven't really tried it but I don't think its possible.
    Paul Reyes the author of : Beekeeping-for-Beginners.Com

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Excel, ALabama, USA
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    I'm definitely not going to try it , I would always borrow brood or re queen and not risk losing two hives. It was just a thought I had- I know someone has tried it as old as beekeeping is. If I had a hundred hives maybe, but with six, I'm not trying. If it would work, just think about the potential benefits.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    4,646

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    Just move her once and let that hive replace her, they probably have the resources to make a better queen anyways. (providing they are a bigger stronger hive)

    But there is still the possibility they won't accept her.

    Then you put two hive at risk, when a frame of brood could do the trick.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    10,351

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    She has to be introduced to the queenless hive which is a risk. She will also then not be accepted back into the original hive if dumped straight in, she would have to be introduced via cage and candy which is another risk.

    It would be good to get the queenless hive layed up, but the risk to reward ratio for this way of going about it is too great, better to follow any of the above advice.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    Quote Originally Posted by kbar1973 View Post
    just think about the potential benefits.
    I thought about it for a while and came up with none.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,713

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    IF it worked, and if there wasn't the risk that the first colony didn't start queen cells in her absence, and/or kill her upon return, AND the if second colony accepted her, rather than kill her, and if one of her eggs developed into a well mated, laying queen, one could requeen queenless colonies with perhaps the best queen in the apiary.

    Way to many "ifs" for most, I suspect. But something to think about, and become informed about.
    After 40 years of beekeeping, I've come to realize that the bees can fix most of my mistakes.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: Hypothehtical question about queenless colony

    But you could take eggs from this queen and risk nothing and accomplish the same thing with one tenth the work at greater odds of success.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •