Unique Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Hive Component-Based Communities as Detected by a H
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  1. #1
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    Default Unique Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Hive Component-Based Communities as Detected by a H

    Unique Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Hive Component-Based Communities as Detected by a Hybrid of Phospholipid Fatty-Acid and Fatty-Acid Methyl Ester Analyses
    Microbial communities (microbiomes) are associated with almost all metazoans, including the honey bee Apis mellifera. Honey bees are social insects, maintaining complex hive systems composed of a variety of integral components including bees, comb, propolis, honey, and stored pollen. Given that the different components within hives can be physically separated and are nutritionally variable, we hypothesize that unique microbial communities may occur within the different microenvironments of honey bee colonies. To explore this hypothesis and to provide further insights into the microbiome of honey bees, we use a hybrid of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to produce broad, lipid-based microbial community profiles of stored pollen, adults, pupae, honey, empty comb, and propolis for 11 honey bee hives. Averaging component lipid profiles by hive, we show that, in decreasing order, lipid markers representing fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, and Gram-positive bacteria have the highest relative abundances within honey bee colonies. Our lipid profiles reveal the presence of viable microbial communities in each of the six hive components sampled, with overall microbial community richness varying from lowest to highest in honey, comb, pupae, pollen, adults and propolis, respectively. Finally, microbial community lipid profiles were more similar when compared by component than by hive, location, or sampling year. Specifically, we found that individual hive components typically exhibited several dominant lipids and that these dominant lipids differ between components. Principal component and two-way clustering analyses both support significant grouping of lipids by hive component. Our findings indicate that in addition to the microbial communities present in individual workers, honey bee hives have resident microbial communities associated with different colony components.
    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0121697
    americasbeekeeper.com
    [email protected]

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Unique Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Hive Component-Based Communities as Detected by

    Correction: Unique Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Hive Component-Based Communities as Detected by a Hybrid of Phospholipid Fatty-Acid and Fatty-Acid Methyl Ester Analyses
    The image for Fig 6 is incorrect. Please see the corrected Fig 6 here.


    Fig 6. Heat map, dendrograms and dot plot representing both lipid and component clustering.
    Heatmap represents a two-way clustering analysis derived from lipid profiles. Vertical dendrogram represents clustering of profiles by components. This dendrogram shows components clustering together at various points in the tree. The dot plot immediately to the right of the vertical diagram represents each of the eleven hives sampled and indicates that communities are not clustering by hive as dots are not found in groups on the same row. Each of the sample labels are color coded to represent sampling year. Similar to component-wise consideration, there appear to be clusters by year, although to a lesser extent. The horizontal dendrogram at the top of the figure represents individual lipids. Clustering can also be observed when considering general lipid division, e.g. the monounsaturated fatty acids group together. Fatty acid coloring: hydroxyl, green; cyclic, orange; branched, purple; monounsaturated, red; saturated, blue; methylated, yellow; polyunsaturated, pink; unclassified, black.
    doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0133100.g001
    americasbeekeeper.com
    [email protected]

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