Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?
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  1. #1
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    Default Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    I am looking at methods of wood preservation alternative to paint. I have looked at copper naphthenate, wax dipping, etc., and now am checking out linseed oil. Is this a good wood treatment? If not, why not? If so, how do you apply? Dip? soak? brush? spray? Also, do you use raw linseed oil, or boiled? Please input, it is appreciated. Thanks.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    I have tried soaking hives in it. I was not impressed. I think they turned dark and soft just as soon as if they were untreated. Not sure why. I was using "boiled" which is probably not really boiled...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    I have used raw linseed for "eating surface" areas of kids playground set, as it is "safe". My understanding is the boiled linseed oil has additives (mineral spirits) to aid in penetration. I use the boiled linseed on deck and non eating areas of the playground-apply with 2 gal. hand sprayer. Only 3 years ago started applying, wood will uptake oil every year.
    Regards,
    KGB-8Fmed

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Better to paint then... ?

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Used boiled linseed oil on a set of hives once. Lasted exactly one winter. Then I was pulling pieces and repainting/repoly-ing.

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    This came up on Google+ recently. Someone had a solution called Swedish Paint (also called Flour Paint). This site has a good overview of it and if you Google either name you'll find a lot of information. I've thought about giving it a try, but I have a lot of leftover paint to use up first.
    3 years / 13 hives / Zone 7A www.backfortybees.com

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Boiled linseed oil (which is indeed no longer boiled, it has metallic "driers" added to cause it to polymerize faster that are toxic) makes a great first primer for boxes. I'd not use it inside, simply because the bees will do a much better job of coating the inside that we do with paint.

    Brush on a coat or two, allow to dry a day or so between, then paint with an alkyd primer (which is partially linseed oil!), then do whatever final coat you wish. The point of using the linseed oil is that it will indeed penetrate slightly into the wood, especially on end grain, and then polymerize in place. Alkyd primer binds very well to fresh linseed oil, since it's essentially linseed oil, pigments, and some other polymerizing agents in solvent, and will stick beautifully. The polymerized oil seals the end grain and cracks around joints, too.

    Without a protective coat of paint, the polymerized linseed oil is vulnerable to UV radiation, beings as the UV will rupture the chemical bonds in the oil and destroy it's integrity. A summer of full sun and you will have essentially an untreated box, no point in that.

    For longevity, paint is definitely the way to go. Use good primer, good paint, and don't "stretch" it, and it will last decades.

    Peter

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Deleted, the information duplicated the post above.
    42 + years - 24 colonies - IPM disciple - Naturally Skeptic

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Quote Originally Posted by westernbeekeeper View Post
    I am looking at methods of wood preservation alternative to paint. I have looked at copper naphthenate, wax dipping, etc., and now am checking out linseed oil. Is this a good wood treatment? If not, why not? If so, how do you apply? Dip? soak? brush? spray? Also, do you use raw linseed oil, or boiled? Please input, it is appreciated. Thanks.
    New to beekeeping , but years of experience with wood and finishes . You want boiled linseed oil , the raw doesn't dry . It's usually brushed or rubbed on , let it soak for a while then wipe the excess . Linseed oil is a very good wood preservative because it actually soaks into the wood . That high gloss you sometimes see is the result of hours of rubbing the oil into the wood , and is probably not necessary to the task at hand . You might recall that in the not-so-distant past houses were painted with a mixture of linseed oil and a pigment - usually white lead back then .
    All of my new woodenware is painted with 2 coats of Do It Best "Best Look exterior latex paint and primer in one" . This paint is made by Sherwin-Williams , and is pretty good stuff . I don't know what it retails for but it ain't cheap - I got this gallon off the mis-tint shelf at my local hardware/lumber store for 5 bucks ... this one's actually pastel tint base that is untinted because the can was bent and they couldn't shake it in their machine . Makes a nice bright white semi-glossy finish .

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    I dip my supers in 80% boiled linseed oil 20% pine rosin. I heat the mixture in a turkey deep fryer to 180 degrees DO NOT OVER HEAT or you will be toast. Then dip the supers I do it on a pretty large scale so it goes quick. It will ad decades to your boxes. I have few boxes done in the late 50's still looking new.
    David
    beebotanical.com 40 years-4000 colonies-treatment eo's

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Quote Originally Posted by westernbeekeeper View Post
    I am looking at methods of wood preservation alternative to paint. I have looked at copper naphthenate, wax dipping, etc., and now am checking out linseed oil. Is this a good wood treatment? If not, why not? If so, how do you apply? Dip? soak? brush? spray? Also, do you use raw linseed oil, or boiled? Please input, it is appreciated. Thanks.
    I did my TBH with boiled linseed oil and beeswax. Melt the beeswax in the linseed oil and apply it with a brush. That was 3 years ago and the finish still looks good. Some people also add turpentine but which ever way you prepare it use caution because it is flammable. There are lots of videos on YouTube.
    Colino
    But every sunday afternoon he is a dirt track demon
    In a '57 chevrolet- Jim Croce

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    I just coated some ware with a 3 part mixture of beeswax, turpentine, and olive oil. After rubbing it into the wood, I decided that I like the appearance but I cannot attest to how long it will last. Note: the weather really hasn't been warm enough for the mixture to properly penetrate the wood- still has a mild pine scent to it which is actually somewhat pleasing.
    Year 2 Zone 6a

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I have tried soaking hives in it. I was not impressed.
    I have not done it to bee boxes but my concern would be that the boxes would glue together and be hard to separate.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    >I have not done it to bee boxes but my concern would be that the boxes would glue together and be hard to separate.

    You have to let them dry before you use them. It might if you don't. I just wasn't impressed. They did not seem to last any longer than untreated and seemed to get darker and softer sooner.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Quote Originally Posted by westernbeekeeper View Post
    I am looking at methods of wood preservation alternative to paint. I have looked at copper naphthenate, wax dipping, etc., and now am checking out linseed oil. Is this a good wood treatment? If not, why not? If so, how do you apply? Dip? soak? brush? spray? Also, do you use raw linseed oil, or boiled? Please input, it is appreciated. Thanks.
    This might be of interest to you: http://www.cedaroilstore.com/PETRI_W...R_p/ws6004.htm
    David Matlock

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Hi Benjamin, I had been wondering how you've been doing. Hope things are going well for you.

    I melt & mix linseed oil & bees wax together in a soft paste. Rub it onto the box and into the end grain well, then go over it with a propane torch. It will sizzle as it penetrates. While the surface is still very warm, rub in another coat and let it sit.
    Next day rub it again to distribute any excess paste/oil to dry areas and reduce the stickiness of saturated areas.

    It lasts a couple years in my very wet climate, but all you have to do to refinish it is rub in more paste and a quick pass of a torch. It's fast and easy with no paint or urethane residue to sand off. I like it. And like the ease of which I can refinish it when the time comes.

    I have also stained the pine, then applied this paste. The stain soaks into the box joint ends well and holds up very well when covered with the linseed oil & bees wax.
    The finish is dull once it is done.

    I've tried many methods of preserving box's and even excellent quality primer and paint can bubble from interior moisture sources.

    I don't have a vat to simmer my woodenware. But the propane torch makes a good substitute.



    You can see my torch on the left, sizzling on the right



    Finished lid, needs a final wipe.


    50/50 linseed oil and beeswax, melted together and cooled. I add a couple drop of lemongrass or other essential oil just to make it smell amazing. You can dilute this mix a little more with additional linseed oil and warm in the microwave before appyling





    I'll use almost a pint like this on a single deep, inner cover & lid.



    Last edited by Lauri; 02-18-2015 at 09:43 AM.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  18. #17
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Lauri- Is that raw or boiled linseed oil?

    I really like that. I think I'll try it on the latest box build........once it warms up a little!

    Richard

  19. #18
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Pretty sure it was boiled
    Last edited by Lauri; 02-18-2015 at 10:00 AM.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  20. #19
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    Boiled linseed oil in todays world isn't boiled, it has heavy metals added as driers. I don't want it inside my hives. Outside it won't last long by itself. Raw linseed oil takes forever to dry, but it is pure linseed oil. The polymerized is true boiled linseed oil, someone took the time to boil it in an enclosed container to make it form polymer chains. It dries faster and better than raw linseed oil, but it is still 100% linseed oil. The "boiled" oil you can buy in most places is actually mostly raw linseed oil, with plasticizers, hardeners, and heavy metals to make it act like true boiled oil, without the time and effort it takes to actually boil it; in other words, it's cheap. All of the linseed oils will self combust, so be careful how you dispose of rags or paper towels that have it on them.

  21. #20
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    Default Re: Linseed Oil as hive dip/preservative?

    I wonder if the heat from the torch on a raw oil mix would simulate the boiled process enough to form the polymer chains? It does penetrate well when heated.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

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