Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?
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  1. #1
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    Default Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    I friend beekeeper told me that beekeepers of the American continent with many beehives are replacing queens through a very simple and fast technique . They do it by placing a cocoon with a queen about to be born on top of the hive with at least one medium on to separate cocoon from the nest . High frequency the new queen is not killed in the cocoon , born and replaces the old queen .

    May you please confirm if this technique is used and with success?

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    I have done it with pretty good success if the weather is not cold. If it gets chilly at night when you do this the bees may not keep the queen cell warm enough. I wouldn't call it 100% but I would say when it fails they usually didn't really need a new queen...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    It's a whole new area that opens up to me. Michael can you give me some more details on this technique?

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    >It's a whole new area that opens up to me. Michael can you give me some more details on this technique?

    I think you pretty much have it. Your raise queen cells. You go to your beeyard and you put the cells in a super if the weather is warm at night. Put it in the brood nest if not. The advantage to the super is they may be less likely to tear it down and you don't have to lift as many boxes. The disadvantage is they are less likely to keep it warm. The advantage to the brood nest is they are more likely to keep it warm. I'm not so sure they are more likely to tear it down or not, but I'd rather not lift boxes. The best thing about this technique is the time you save not finding queens.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Michael what is the minimum temperature above which I can use this technique without taking big risks?

    Michael this technique should be used in late summer when there are still drones or early spring when there is already drones?

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Does this use the supersedure tendency of the bees? Would this be a good way to requeen a mean hive without finding the queen?

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    >Does this use the supersedure tendency of the bees?

    Yes.

    >Would this be a good way to requeen a mean hive without finding the queen?

    Yes, but I would still break them up into smaller hives first. It will make them less defensive and therefore less likely to tear down the cells and at least most of those divisions will be queenless which will improve the odds as well. Just set each box of the original hive on it's own stand and put in a queen cell the next day. Put a box of drawn but empty comb on the original stand and put a queen cell there the next day.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eduardo Gomes View Post
    Michael what is the minimum temperature above which I can use this technique without taking big risks?
    More important than the temperature is the flow. Is there one? If you place queen cells without a flow on, the results will be poor. So, do it when the weather is good and the bees are filling the supers with honey.

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Thank you Michael Palmer. In that case I should do it at half of Spring when the nectar flow is more intense in my region.

    Do you think this technique has some negative influence on honey production ?

    This technique helps in some way control the swarm?

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by jbraun View Post
    ......Would this be a good way to requeen a mean hive without finding the queen?
    Africanized or defensive European bees are difficult to requeen....This technique seems like something my friends in that situation should try. I'm assuming the queen cell should be ripe and ready to hatch within 24 hours. Has anyone tried introducing a newly hatched virgin into a defensive hive?
    ...We don't see things as they are, we see things as WE are...

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    I like to place the queen cells in the middle of brood nest with either a cell protector or some aluminum foil wrapped around the cell. Duct tape also works.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Releasing a virgin into the normal queen less hive is challenging enough. I got many casualties this way. They will balled her after 3
    days for unknown reason. So to improve the chance of a successful introduction is to use a cloak board
    to divide the hive temporarily. After the 3 days that the virgin got hatched then you can remove the cloak board for the virgin to roam. Is it better if
    there are many nurse bees to go with the frames where the virgin or the qc is being introduced. Yes, it can be done. If not flow on then honey syrup feed them.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  14. #13

    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    I use the "second emerge cell" by Nicot for requeening production hives in late summer. It is more or less a plastic swarm cell, not to be confused with the cell protector. You take the emerged new queen, put her into the plastic swarm cell and place her into the middle of the broodnest. I do not take out the old queen. I got that trick from:

    Cells are introduced without de-queening.
    Some years ago I decided to take the advice of an elderly beekeeper acquaintance and requeen my hives using 10 day protected queen cells. The cells are introduced around the end of the honey flow without first de queening. This method induces a natural queen supercedure at a time of year when the weather is usually settled and bees will readily accept a new queen.
    http://www.carricell.com/#!CARICELL-...6-CAAB82D1CA10

    The queen frees herself from the plastic cell in 5 to 15 minutes. It is essential to make a small cut in the tip of the wax cap. You basicly push out a small circle of wax to form the cap, wrap this wax circle around the free tip of the plastic swarm cell and your're done.





    Watch out, so you don't squeeze the queen's legs when introducing her into the cell. By rubbing - just a very very little of - honey to the wax cap, the young queen readily goes down and feeds on the honey and you can close the cell without endangering the queen.


  15. #14
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eduardo Gomes View Post
    Do you think this technique has some negative influence on honey production ?

    This technique helps in some way control the swarm?
    I don't think this would have a negative influence on honey production.

    I suppose it could help with swarming. Swarming is one way that colonies re-queen themselves. We're told that maintaining our colonies with young queens reduces swarming. So, if you re-queen a colony of bees it could help reduce swarming in that colony.

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Does this method of re-queening stimulate the old queen to take a crowd and swarm?

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    I use the "second emerge cell" by Nicot for requeening production hives in late summer.
    Whow!! Great lesson! Thank you very much Bernhard.

    In later summer do you have a nectar flow in your region?

  18. #17

    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    Where do you get those cups?
    There is a hole and a lid in the back, so queen is easy to slip in there.

  19. #18
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    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    I suppose it could help with swarming.
    It makes perfect sense what you say . All this information will help me a lot. In my process of management of apiaries I can say that it is critical . I am very grateful!

  20. #19

    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    If you time it well enough, it'll work like a charm. At the end of the last flow; when you find natural superseding. It is possible though that there is a swarm here and there. No problem if the old queen's wing is clipped (on one side). The old queen falls down to the ground and dies, while the bees return to the hive.

    The young queen, that has freshly emerged and doesn't smell much, plus she can't run over the combs, is accepted by the bees and sometimes even by the other old queen. This is a picture taken in autumn.





    Old queen and young queen side by side on one comb. In Spring usually the fresh young queen comes out of the winter alone.

  21. #20

    Default Re: Replace the queen of quick and simple way : is it true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    Where do you get those cups?
    For example: http://www.icko-apiculture.com/en/ap...e-reine-u.html

    It is from Nicot, the producer of the Nicot breeding system.

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