Since a plague of honey bee disappearances dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder became known in 2006, the number of registered beekeepers in Florida has almost quadrupled to 3,500. Dave Westervelt, chief apiary inspector for the Florida Department of Agriculture, attributes the beekeeping boom to CCD’s notoriety and to educational opportunities such as the University of Florida’s Bee College and 42 local bee associations. (Palm Beach Post)
Beekeepers from backyard to commercial gather in West Palm Beach


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By Susan Salisbury

Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

West Palm Beach —


Since a plague of honey bee disappearances dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder became known in 2006, the number of registered beekeepers in Florida has almost quadrupled to 3,500.

Dave Westervelt, chief apiary inspector for the Florida Department of Agriculture, attributes the beekeeping boom to CCD’s notoriety and to educational opportunities such as the University of Florida’s Bee College and 42 local bee associations.