The Russian Scion - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    I'm thinking it only works on Russian bees, or if you talk to your bees in a Russian accent. I put one up as well, and you would think you would occasionally see a bee rob propolis from it, but nothing.

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  3. #22
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    Dec 2017
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    Dane County, WI, USA
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    There is a common misconception here which equates this scion to a trap somehow.
    There are NOT the same and work totally differently.

    Trap - is a permanent trap. Bees move into the trap so to live here permanently. You can check a trap once in 1-2 weeks and less frequently.

    Scion - is a very short-term perch that ONLY works as a short-term perch and must be monitored constantly (you have a window of few hours if even that).
    It is only to make catching your own swarm easier (typically, helps to avoid climbing a tree).
    Sometimes a passing swarm will land on it (only to realize this is NOT a livable hive and they need to move on).
    They may even over-night on a scion while looking for a good cavity.
    But bees can NOT live on a rag and will fly away from it as soon as they can (which is kinda of obvious).

    So, I don't know what people are expecting. It is what it is - a bee-perch.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #23
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    May 2002
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    San Mateo, CA
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    Default

    But it doesn't even work as a bee perch. I have seen a few scouts sniffing the LGO scented propolis filled sock. But witnessed several swarms swirling around it with nary a bee landing on it. About ten swarms have landed on the boxed Blue Atlas Cedar. Or on the kiwi covered cyclone fence.
    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

  5. #24
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    Dec 2017
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Well, it does not work for you.

    But it clearly does work for these guys.
    Again - these scions are hanging directly on their own apiaries and they monitor them daily and hourly even.
    You don't check the scions once per week - that is pointless; you need to hang about most all the time to take advantage of it.

    The guy says this is the second swarm on this exact scion hanging on this exact tree (unclear, his own swarm or a passer-by).
    He came in late evening to check on his apiary - tada! a swarm was hanging.
    So he had put that swarm away instead instead of checking some hives.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXmZftYv1LY

    During a nice may weekend, some passer-by swarm landed on a scion.
    The guy picked it up and dumped into a hive. Very convenient.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71R07RIrCWY&t=132s

    In this case though, another passing swarm preferred his free standing trap (with some propolised burlap stapled to it) over several scions AND traps too hanging nearby.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4oHF_tlWz0
    Last edited by GregV; 05-07-2018 at 04:38 PM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  6. #25
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    ... the LGO scented propolis filled sock.....
    I also suspect a difference between "the LGO scented propolis filled sock" and heavily propolised rag (by the bees, not you).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  7. #26
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    San Mateo, CA
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    I will have to have the bees make me a propolised rag.

  8. #27
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    My version of the "russian scion".
    Scored one so far, the season being very late this year.
    For sure bees have been scavenging for easy propolise, I can tell.
    Always someone is sniffing around, most are not mine.
    20180620_141925.jpg

    So now all my traps have a stapled piece of burlap with some slumgum and propolis melted and rubbed into them.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  9. #28
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Here is one way to make that "propolised burlap".
    It works.
    20180709_144454.jpg
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  10. #29
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    Sep 2014
    Location
    Evansville, Indiana, USA
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Worked great for me. Had my first swarm 2 days after I put it up last year.

    I just mixed up lots of propolis, with some wax, olive oil, and lemongrass oil and brushed it over some burlap.

    Bees visited it for two straight months (without refreshing it) and I caught 5 from my main yard.

    First bee swarm april 8.jpg
    All generalizations are false, including this one - Mark Twain

  11. #30
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Here's mine:

    http://www.bushfarms.com/images/BeeC...ssianScion.jpg

    We caught a swarm on it a couple of weeks ago.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  12. #31
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Pretty cool version of the same - free standing "bird house" - I like it best.
    They rubbed it with propolis and some mint.
    I would staple in a propolised rag myself.

    You wrap the bees, pick them up and set the rig straight up into a cool/dark corner for a day just as is (basement).
    Then install.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zNFLWK_3nY
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  13. #32
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    Jun 2013
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    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Greg,

    That's a very interesting youTube, including what amounts to Taranov board, instead of the usual cloth arrangement.

    But I have a couple of questions: why the temporary storage in the dark? (I may not have caught that in the audio, or the text.) Is that because the hive design doesn't allow direct dumping in?

    I always just dump a swarm right in, and I've had good luck with that. I usually immediately add a frame of brood to anchor them, though that risks perpetuation of any disease or parasite risks, and forestalls the possibility of a quick OAV to clean the broodless swarm up. I don't have a lot of experience with catching swarms, though, so maybe I've just been lucky.

    Nancy

  14. #33
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    Default Re: The Russian Scion

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    Greg,

    That's a very interesting youTube, including what amounts to Taranov board, instead of the usual cloth arrangement.

    But I have a couple of questions: why the temporary storage in the dark? (I may not have caught that in the audio, or the text.) Is that because the hive design doesn't allow direct dumping in?

    I always just dump a swarm right in, and I've had good luck with that. I usually immediately add a frame of brood to anchor them, though that risks perpetuation of any disease or parasite risks, and forestalls the possibility of a quick OAV to clean the broodless swarm up. I don't have a lot of experience with catching swarms, though, so maybe I've just been lucky.

    Nancy
    In that particular video you should have noticed - it was installation into a vertical log hive.
    Partly why they were installed through the entrance (I suspect).
    But partly, it is a tradition to install swarms using boards/plywood through the entrance (if you think of traditional log hives/skeps, you can see why - it was easiest way in, actually).

    Like you said - frame transfers often amount to infection/parasite transfers (especially the current parasite - talking the mites).
    As for me, that alone is a good enough argument to avoid using "anchoring brood".

    Parking a perched swarm for 24-48 hours in a cool and dark basement-like conditions a typical way to minimize post-installation absconding.
    Naturally, if it is dark, they have no motivation to be trying to take off - the darkness keeps them calm and stable right on the perch.
    Heck, you can keep them 3-4 days in storage if the conditions allow and/or demand (bad weather/no time).
    They just will be more agreeable then to settle down for good (spray water on them if keeping into 3-4 days).

    Being a kid, watching/catching/installing swarms was my prime summer-time job (some responsibility there).
    So when we installed the swarms I was always told sending them through the entrance is a better way to do it because they go through the experience of proper entering the hive (as they normally would when landing).
    That too helps to minimize absconding I was told.
    Now thinking of the swarm landing on my back-porch trap last summer - I do think it makes some sense (having natural birth vs. C-section comparison comes to mind).

    We do not recall my Father ever using or talking of brood frames to "hold" the swarm down.
    I do recall of him being critical of direct dumping of the swarms as if improper, unnatural way - this is because "the swarms must enter the new home through the entrance".
    That is the way in.

    PS: I personally just do what is convenient for a specific case and time; not religious about it.
    Last edited by GregV; 02-22-2019 at 10:30 AM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

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