How to lower moisture content - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    chelmsford, ma. usa
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: How to lower moisture content

    oh boy, i was just wondering if you pull a deep vacuum on the honey, would it turn to a near solid?
    hmmm. maybe sometime will try it.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Olympia Washington
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: How to lower moisture content

    Some of my honey had too much moisture in it so I put open frames in a bathroom with the door shut and a dehumidifier on. I left someone else in charge while I was out of town. They left the dehumidifier on for a couple of days.
    Today I used a defractometer and the capped honey and the uncapped honey were both at 15 1/2 percent. This is the first year I pulled frames of honey for myself in the past I always stored the honey to give back to the bees. I'm thinking this might be too much moisture gone from the honey??? Not sure what to do at this point. Also this is the honey I pulled in July I just wasn't able to spin it yet. Anyone have any knowledge about this. I know the moisture content is good at about 18% but Not sure what to do about this.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    2,335

    Default Re: How to lower moisture content

    I believe 17.8 and under is what people shoot for to prevent fermentation. I would bottle the honey and be happy is was that low. The only drawback is that it may crystallize faster. But honey is hygroscopic so it will absorb water from the air. So, it might be higher by the time you process it, depending on the humidity in your honey house/room. J

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Olympia Washington
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: How to lower moisture content

    Since this is the middle of winter how would you recommend getting the honey "warm" enough to be able to spin it? It's in my house but I keep my house at 65 degrees daytime and 48 at night.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    2,335

    Default Re: How to lower moisture content

    There are threads on here about how to stack your supers over a light bulb which will warm them up nicely. If you don't want to mess around too much, you could try a "trouble light" under the supers. Be sure that the light is protected from honey dripping on it. Drape a comforter over the boxes. You could also put a space heater in your bathroom. Might take a few days, but it will work. Of course, keep safety in mind. J

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    274

    Default Re: How to lower moisture content

    Removing or the ebb and flow of moisture from honey to air or back, or into wood and back to air is a slow process. Ever wait for a pot to boil?

    I live in a high humidity area near the sea. I have a bee shed in which I have installed both a dehumidifier and a heater. When extracting I keep the room dry, less than 55%, and warm, above 80F, like 90F to keep my uncapped frames from absorbing water and to dry any sets of frames with high water content. I dry them in the salad spinner, uncapped.

    Technical issues: refractometer reading are sensitive and should be calibrated. I was having trouble with mine and discovered it was a sucrose refractometer and not corrected for honey ( glucose & fructose, mainly). Nor was the supplier able to explain how the device, marked ATC, actually compensated for temperature - I think it means to allow time for it to stabilize to 68F. 18% MC means 18% water at a specific temperature of 68F or correct it for the temperature at which you measure it. I have also noticed that a 5-gal. pail will "split" with lower, denser honey at the bottom and higher moisture levels at the top - just like honey in a comb cell. I borrowed a calibrated digital refractometer ($350-500 type) to examine and find all these issues. I may get one for peace of mind.

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