My recipe/method for sugar blocks - Page 22
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  1. #421
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    Default Re: How many trays will this recipe make?

    Yeah, don't cook it. Once you get the over heated to 170, just turn it off, and then set them in there for a couple hours to get hard.

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  3. #422
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    Oct 2016
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    Olympia Washington
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    Default Re: How many trays will this recipe make?

    Unfortunately my stove is gas and will only go down to 170 degrees. It's been in the oven for a while Now I just need to know what this sugar is supposed to look and feel like when done. In one of Lauri's posts I think I read to put it in the oven on low heat for a few hrs but that's all I got.

  4. #423
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    Default Re: How many trays will this recipe make?

    Yeah, turn the oven to 170 and when it reaches 170, turn it off because you don't want to cook the sugar cakes, you just need to dry them out. When they're done they'll look just the same as when you put them in, only they'll be a hardened slab. You're basically just drying all the humidity out of them. You can press them with your finger when done, and your finger shouldn't sink in. So, nice and hard like a brick.

  5. #424
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    Tsawwassen, BC, Canada
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    Default Re: How many trays will this recipe make?


  6. #425
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    Aug 2016
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    Timonium, Maryland
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    Default Re: How many trays will this recipe make?

    Happy Thanksgiving!!!

    After reading and watching lots of youtube, I came up with the recipe that I thought will be the easiest for me.

    Here what I did:
    1. I put 1 cup of hot water in the bucket
    2. Added 2 tbs apple cider vinegar and 2 drops of lemon grass essential oil
    3. Added 10 cups of sugar in total: add 2 cups at the time and kept mixing until I got homogenous mix.
    4. Put mix in a 9x13x2 foil cake pan (I put parchment paper at the bottom), evened it up using a rolling pin and a tall glass.
    5. Sprinkled a little more water (10ml) on the top (I believe this is optional)
    6. Put in the oven and brought temperature to 200F (about 3 min) and let it stay in the oven 'till morning.

    I believe this is the most easiest way to make it.
    I'll be happy to hear any comments about this approach.

    Thanks

    PS: does anyone have any youtube videos how do you make your brick ?

  7. #426
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by herbcoop View Post
    Shinbone my first came out real bad then I tried again and this one came out perfect

    1 bag 4 pound of sugar from walmart
    1/3 cup of bragg vinegar
    4 teaspoon bee pro
    1/4 teaspoon of the electrolytes

    Mix real good, I used a cookie sheet pan and laid parchment paper down and I spread the mixture on the parchment paper and lightly rolled it out with a rolling pin. I used my pizza cutter to cut 6 blocks. I have a dial oven so I put a meat thermometer in to make sure it was around 170 degrees and then baked for 2 hours and checked. I then left it in the pan on a cooling rack until the next morning then stored them in air tight container
    Just wanted to update this which I think is the original Laurie's Sugar Brick recipe thread. I only have 2 hives, so used the above reduced recipe using 4lbs of sugar and it came out perfect. DO NOT COOK THE SUGAR. I just let it dry on the dining room table and it was rock hard in 3 days. No need for parchment paper either. It will pop right out of the cookie sheet if dry. Also, for you folks who are using a 5lb recipe, do you realize that bags of sugar are 4 lbs, not 5? They used to be 5 lbs, but that was a long time ago.

  8. #427
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    I can still buy 5 lb sugar in my area at Shoprite.

  9. #428
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    My wife says she can't remember the last time a bag of sugar was 5lbs. We must be getting ripped off up here!

  10. #429
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Fivej View Post
    My wife says she can't remember the last time bags of sugar was 5lbs. We must be getting ripped off up here!
    Can only find them in the store brand. Everyone else has gone to 4 lb. Just like everything else, 5 oz tuna from 6, 5 oz yogurt from 6, etc. It's very annoying.

  11. #430
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Still using the fortified sugar blocks. Same exact recipe. Coming out a long, colder than normal winter in great shape.

    Night time temps in the mid-high 20's, day time mid to high 40's. Looking forward to some warmer weather soon! Not all hives are at the same stage, but the more active ones will get me started with plenty of queen rearing resources when weather permits. I usually start grafting the first week in April if weather is normal.









    There will be fewer surprises this spring after using my thermal imaging FLIR ONE. There is a learning curve to reading the images correctly. I'll write something up about that at some point.
    Many colonies low in the hives with lots of honey overhead.







    Some hives with really black queens not showing the white hot broodnest heat, but have large populations. Queens look good, swelling up. I assume they have a little more Carniolan influence than others and are waiting for natural feed sources to kick in. Only hives that are light, in single deeps or I want to build up early have a sugar block. Most hives do not because I don't want to make that many and I don't want them all at the same stage at once.

    That imaging allowed me to catch colonies that were high in the hives early on, so I could slip in a sugar block to hold them until temps allowed some reconfiguration of honey frames.
    Last edited by Lauri; 02-25-2017 at 06:33 AM.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  12. #431
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    [QUOTE=Lauri;1517385]



    Some hives with really black queens not showing the white hot broodnest heat
    QUOTE]

    Only because I consider these images extremely misleading. That "White Hot" (which it is not anywhere near) is all of 28.5 degrees F. Hardly white hot, hardly warm and well below freezing. For most looking at the pretty colors they would think. Oh look how warm and cozy it is in there. and I think the use of phrases such as White Hot are disturbingly inaccurate.
    Look at the right edge of the photo it has a scale this photo is registering between 21.2 and 28.5 degrees. Is it warmer than that inside the cluster? if not those bees are probably dead. but then this is not a photo of inside the cluster. it is a photo of the hive box. Hate to say it but IR is not X-Ray.
    Everything gets darker, as it goes to where there is less light. Darrel Tank (5PM drawing instructor)

  13. #432
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    I love your sugar blocks, we are having a warmer winter than normal, 70's. bouncing all over the place. I have had to feed a few of the hives blocks threes times since January. I think they are fine and the blocks are gone when we check two weeks later.
    They are out flying constantly and have been most of the winter.

    All the hives still have capped honey. We have a ton of brood going on, two of the hives are brooding in the top hive box. Four of the hives look like spring is here. Solid frames of brood.
    Zone 6b: 18 hives in Maryland, Carniolan, Italian mix mutts: Still learning - started bees spring of 2014.

  14. #433
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Although this is a thread about sugar blocks, I'll talk a little about the heat imaging.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    I think the use of phrases such as White Hot are disturbingly inaccurate.
    I use the term 'white hot' to describe the color difference indicator between the center of what appears to be the broodnest or at least the colony's cluster and the outer edges. Not talking about molten steel here, just the temp differences of bugs in a wood box.

    I've found the unit to be extremely useful and accurate, although as I said, there is a fair learning curve to reading the images correctly. I won't muddy up this thread with those lengthy details like reflective readings, different box color heat absorption during daytime hours, etc..

    Just like the condensation pattern on my foam insulation. Just an indicator to the colony's size and location.
    After using both methods, I've found in the majority of cases they were both, while not perfect, quite accurate.






    Below is an example of what I was talking about.

    This hive had a 2014 breeder queen still heading the hive last time I saw her late summer. The imaging showed me the colony was at the top of the hive late January.

    Indeed, when I got a chance to inspect myself, it was as shown, disk marked queen still heading the hive with a good start to a broodnest but mostly in the top box.
    Although the hive was very heavy, due to my last season's bad weather a majority of the honey & fall feed was stored below. By hefting the weight alone I would never have considered this hive needed adjustment this early.

    I removed the bottom box, lowered the colony onto the bottom deep and topped with the collected honey and drawn frames + feeder.
    Here it is in early Feb. I slipped them a sugar block to hold them over until I could get into them and make adjustments. There is an empty 1 1/2 gallon pro feeder in the top on the left side:



    And after reconfiguration, late Feb photo:



    Now the wisdom of pushing a queen going into her fourth season this early in spring is debatable, but this hive is in far better shape than it would have been if overlooked for weeks or even a couple months.

    No matter how poorly my non technical language is of the imaging color, I don't think anyone can argue it isn't an invaluable tool for late winter, non invasive 'inspections'. Including catching queenless colonies before it is too late to help them out by ether requeening or combining. When I get a day with warm enough temps to open a few hives, I know exactly which hives I need to go to first without going through 200 hives, without wasting time and that rare few hours I can actually look for myself and rectify interior frame location if needed.

    Finding dead outs early too has been a real advantage. Not only to collect and redistribute those resources to other needy or growing hives, but to get a jump on springtime work so I don't get so swamped with work when weather clears. Anything I can do now keeps me ahead of the game later on.

    Dead out mating nuc under a foot of snow in foreground, others in good shape behind it



    My pony is still alive, although her head registers 38.7 degrees F.

    You'll also notice, because I don't have my FLIR ONE temperature settings adjusted, the hives behind her look like all dead outs. As it is set, my imaging focuses on the hottest area and shows lesser areas at a distance much cooler than they really are. I'm not techie so I am not sure how to set it correctly. That mares temperature is about 100 degrees.







    Turkeys are still alive too. Looks like they are heating the cluster, not the entire hive
    Last edited by Lauri; 02-25-2017 at 11:22 AM.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  15. #434
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Great photos from Lauri, as usual. A thermal imager is the next big ticket item on my want list.
    --shinbone
    (1975-1980, and now since 2011; maintain about 10 hives; Zone 5b; 15" rain; 5500')

  16. #435
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauri View Post
    .

    I've found the unit to be extremely useful and accurate, although as I said, there is a fair learning curve to reading the images correctly. I won't muddy up this thread with those lengthy details like reflective readings, different box color heat absorption during daytime hours, etc..
    There would be no need for you to make extra effort to muddy up such information. it is muddy enough as is. I understand how you intend to use the term white hot. I am saying it is misleading. I have seen this images used in such a way time and time again. Such as claims that bees het the hive. if so they are doing a very poor job of it. They did not manage to keep that one above freezing. BUt as I said. people will look at the pretty colors and think Oh my they really do keep it toasty in there.
    Everything gets darker, as it goes to where there is less light. Darrel Tank (5PM drawing instructor)

  17. #436
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    I don't think the thermal images are misleading. They show, through color differences, that the bees are generating heat, and therefore, still alive. You can also tell where in the hive box the cluster is. This is all very useful info that can be obtained in winter when the hive can't be opened. The image also shows temperature read out, so the actual temp of the surface of the hive is clear. We are talking about wood boxes sitting out in the snow, so "white hot" is obviously just a euphemism.
    --shinbone
    (1975-1980, and now since 2011; maintain about 10 hives; Zone 5b; 15" rain; 5500')

  18. #437
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    I am saying it is misleading. I have seen this images used in such a way time and time again. Such as claims that bees het the hive. if so they are doing a very poor job of it. They did not manage to keep that one above freezing.
    Of course bees DO "heat" the hive!

    Heating the 'hive' is a byproduct of bees heating the cluster. And the bees heat the cluster by vibrating their wing muscles and essentially converting sugar/honey/carbohydrates into heat.

    The actual temperature of the cluster varies, with the center the hottest, and the outside of the cluster at a lower temperature. The air inside the hive surrounding the cluster is colder than the cluster, but still warmer than the air outside the hive. Portions of hive body itself may not be above freezing, but it is still being heated above ambient temperature.

    This is not exactly new, groundbreaking research, this information has been available for many decades! For instance, a USDA study from 1950:
    https://beesource.com/resources/usda/...-bee-colonies/

    One of the graphics from that study shows internal temperatures ...

    FIGURE 2. - Temperature readings ( F.) and brood and bee location one comb west of center of cluster at outside temperature of 7.


    Of course, online graphics display capabilities have changed somewhat since the 1950s, but the message is clear - bees DO heat the hive to some degree.

    And for more discussion on 'heating the hive', see this earlier thread:
    https://www.beesource.com/forums/show...r-Not-the-Hive
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  19. #438
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Hey, no worries.
    That's why I post photos, so folks can see what I am talking about more easily and to come to their own conclusions.

    If you don't like the FLIR ONE, don't buy one.
    I'm OK with that.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  20. #439
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    And my horse's white head?

    FLIR_ONE_170206T073141.jpg

    Well actually....

    P1010176.jpg
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  21. #440
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    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Lauri, Thanks for being Lauri. Always trying to help folks understand what goes on inside a bee hive.

    Being involved with thermography for many years, predictive maintenance program where I worked, your images were well done and the term "white hot" is a relative term... Especially on a honeybee forum. Thanks again for all you do.

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