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Thread: Quilt Box?

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Strafford County, NH
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    2,413

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Krispy View Post
    Inner cover goes on top of quilt box. If its under, it blocks the benefit of the quilt box. Moisture gets trapped under the inner cover.
    Oh. That may be why they said in bee club: don't use an inner cover with a quilt box.

    I put my inner cover under the quilt box so I could put winter food in there, but if you think the inner cover itself will trap and drip condensation, then I'll remove the inner cover altogether, and just put feed directly on top of the frames, with a shim to space.

    Doesn't seem much good in putting an inner cover *over* the quilt box, bees can't get to it thru the shavings.

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Strafford County, NH
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    2,413

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    So to summarize, what's the verdict: inner cover or no inner cover with a quilt box, and if so, where?

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Viola, OR, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewbeeInNH View Post

    I put my inner cover under the quilt box so I could put winter food in there, [snip]
    ....and therein lies the crux of my problem. Where do you top feed when using a QB?

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Cloquet, MN
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Put a spacer under the quilt box to make room for food. I recessed the screen in my quilt boxes to make room for sugar bricks.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Viola, OR, USA
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    68

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Krispy View Post
    Put a spacer under the quilt box to make room for food. I recessed the screen in my quilt boxes to make room for sugar bricks.
    And then feed directly on the frames?

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Quote Originally Posted by Luterra View Post
    Based on Rusty's general plan I built these 4-in-1 inner covers for Pacific Northwest wet-winter beekeeping. They have a 1 1/4" space between the screen and top bars for placement of pollen/fondant patties. A few hives have tried to build comb in this space, but generally they don't.
    I really like the design. Have you had any issues with the strip for the mason jar feeder being large enough to have moisture condense on?

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewbeeInNH View Post
    So to summarize, what's the verdict: inner cover or no inner cover with a quilt box, and if so, where?
    No inner cover

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Bedford County, PA USA
    Posts
    232

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    I'm using one this year. Shallow super with aluminum screen on the bottom, then a queen excluder stapled to it and filled with clean natural wood shavings. The finer mesh should keep the dust down and the queen excluder provides structural support. I have 2 ea., 3/4 inch holes drilled at an upward angle on each side of the super, with aluminum screening stapled on the inside to keep out critters. Holes provide ventilation. I'm painting it now.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Cobourg, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    check out this thread in the Equipment section:

    https://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ox-ventilation

  11. #50

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    Does anyone have images of the quilt box Luterra created? They aren't available anymore for some reason

  12. #51
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,741

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Have cloth above the screening at least in most of the center area so wood particles are not falling down into the brood. I like to use an inch and a half shim for feeder space and to keep the bees from propolizing the the quilt box screen down to the frames. Makes a mess when you try to lift it for inspection/pollen sub feeding in spring.

    Vent the top of the quilt box so the gradually transpiring moisture can dissipate to the air. The idea is not to suck up and store it! 4 or 5 gallons of water is produced from metabolizing the winters honey and the quilt box will dissipate it draft free while still providing good R value.
    Frank

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Otsego County, NY, USA
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Many russian/ukrainian beekeepers use a sheet of plastic as an inner cover, some use a piece of cotton canvas which the bees can propalize to allow the level of air exchange they want. University of Guelph, Ontario uses exclusively 10 oz cotton duck as an inner cover. Ian Steglar in Manitoba uses reflective film bubble wrap with a triagle flap the can be folded back to allow access to a migratory cover hive top feeder. Many of these people winter indoors.

  14. #53

    Default

    Thanks for the clarification. This is good info, especially regarding the bees propolizing the quilt box. Thanks for the response!

  15. #54

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    I've seen some of U of G videos, and have seen his duck cloth. My concern is that it would block any ability to do winter feeding, and would block the quilt box from working correctly. I've heard that inner covers should be removed so the quilt box can work best and suck up as much moisture as possible. What do you think?

  16. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Otsego County, NY, USA
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Quilt Box?

    Much depends on the rest of the hive design. Roger Delon's concept of the climate controlled hive uses a vapor impermeable top liner. By nature the heavy moist co2 laden air rises above the cluster then to the outside edges of the hive and falls to the bottom having an opportunity to condense on the side walls and the bottom. Both the Alpine Hive and the UDAV are based roughly on his ideas. The quilt will lose efficiency as an insulator as it becomes saturated. It really shocked me when I started to watch Russian beekeepers with plastic sheet inner covers and very small entrances. Wouldn't think there would be enough ventilation but it seems to work for them. Most of them feed fondant in the winter, under the plastic. Before winter they put feeders under the plastic or on top of with a hole cut in the plastic as Ian does.

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