CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links) - Page 5
Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 182
  1. #81

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Ok, fine. I just wait for the absolute definition of realistic dosages found outside in the field.

    At least I find it interesting that ACh is in use outside the neural system. And the importance for the development of the larvae.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Spencer, MA, USA
    Posts
    2,862

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    There is no doubt that neonics are poisonous to bees. It's just my opinion that they are less deadly than anything that can replace them right now. I don't delude myself that farmers are going to give up pesticides and having seen the devastation to hive from the organophosphates, I'm pretty happy that I have never seen that from neonics. The only hives I've lost to pesticides is from a idiot spraying apples during the day while in bloom. Even then the hives survived for a while. My father lost about 50 hives in about 20 minutes when I was a kid. Dead bees everywhere, you could scoop them up with a shovel.

  4. #83

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Performance of honeybee colonies located in neonicotinoid-treated and untreated cornfields in Quebec

    M. Alburaki1,2,†,*, B. Cheaib1, L. Quesnel1, P.-L. Mercier1,2, M. Chagnon3 andN. Derome1,4
    Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2016

    DOI: 10.1111/jen.12336

    "Overall, our results show that forager bees collected 20% of corn pollen containing variable concentrations of neonicotinoids. Colonies located in treated cornfields expressed higher varroa loads and long-term mortality than those in untreated cornfields."
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...omisedMessage=

  5. #84
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,716

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Bees that are collecting feed corn pollen are starving.
    Johno

  6. #85

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Johno,

    that's true. But bees forage for corn pollen here on a regular basis. I already posted pictures and videos on beesource some time ago.


    Neonicotinoid-contaminated pollinator strips adjacent to cropland reduce honey bee nutritional status
    Christina L. Mogren & Jonathan G. Lundgren

    Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 29608 (2016) doi:10.1038/srep29608
    Published online: 14 July 2016

    citation:
    "Increasing concentrations of clothianidin in bee bread were correlated with decreased glycogen, lipid, and protein in workers. This study shows that small, isolated areas set aside for conservation do not provide spatial or temporal relief from neonicotinoid exposures in agricultural regions where their use is largely prophylactic."
    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep29608

  7. #86
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,106

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    " Colonies located in treated cornfields expressed higher varroa loads and long-term mortality than those in untreated cornfields."
    I can't dispute the finding, but my apiaries are surrounded by clothianadin corn and I'm not seeing what they say they are finding. The states of New York and Vermont have been testing my colonies, looking for varroa and nosema. Varroa loads in July have been 0-2.

    My cell building apiary is a good example. Surrounded by corn. 35 very strong colonies. 64 very strong brood factory nucs. Made enough queen cells to produce about 1200 mated queens. Brood factories gave me enough brood to set up 56 cell builders, and about 200 4 frame nucs for wintering.

    Now, I've used this apiary for years as my cell building yard and as a brood source for most of my nucs. Don't you think, if treated corn was a real problem for my bees, I would know? And please, don't play the sublethal card.

  8. #87

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Do you feed your cell builders and supporting colonies? I mean, during the season.

  9. #88

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    A good beekeeper can make up for a lot of problems. And you are a good beekeeper, Michael Palmer.

    I visited a friend some days ago, he's a master beekeeper (and professional beekeeper, 3rd generation). What we found is this:



    Upper part of the body is more brown than shown in this archive picture. Abdomen is white.

    What would you say this is? We'd say it is chilling of the brood. But how come? Formerly thriving hives, boiling with bees. Suddenly spotty broodnests, and the pupae look like this. We opened almost every single broodcell in those hives. We did not found any mites, absolutely zero.

    What is it? What's wrong with those hives?



    Even queens.



    You see the difference between the cappings of the outer and inner brood?


  10. #89
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    6,586

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    I don't know, are you suggesting it could only be neonics? I have seen some fungicide issues that resembled this. I do know it's something any good beekeeper would want an answer for.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  11. #90
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,106

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    Do you feed your cell builders and supporting colonies? I mean, during the season.
    No, only some feed to the cell builders when I graft, but not otherwise. In fact, this year the sumac flow was so intense that my breeder colonies filled the grafting comb with nectar as soon as I gave it to them. Made it difficult to find graft-able larvae.

  12. #91

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    I don't know, are you suggesting it could only be neonics?
    No, of course not. In this case shown above that are pictures from the poisoning incident some time ago. Bees were tested in the state labs and they found clothianidin as the causing pesticide. Bayer paid compensation to the beekeepers and this company usually doesn't do this quickly. It simply was the fault of that pesticide.

    So if you find this like you see in the pictures, this should be some sort of poisoning. We have seen this before with the pesticide Insegar, so yes, it is not only neonics. But too often neonics were involved. We don't only talk, we get it laboratory tested and thus proofed. Problem is, that doesn't help much with the overall situation. Only thing we can do, is to prevent the foraging on neonic crops as good as we can. A friend took his bees into the forest, only to find out, that the christmas trees grown there were sprayed with Karate Forst, another neonic. He lost 50 hives.

    It is heart breaking when you open your hives and find this sh*t shown above. You do your best to keep the bees in a perfect shape. And you end up with trouble over and over again. Trouble you can't really escape.

  13. #92
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,106

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Bernhard, I'm not trying to disprove what you say. I'm only wondering out loud why I don't see such clothianadin poisoning in my bees. Is it that the poisoned colonies had nothing to forage on but corn?

  14. #93
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,716

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    I have never seen neonics sprayed in my area, only seed coatings are used. I would suspect that neonics could be sprayed onto cotton south of my location and that would probably cause bee losses. However I am in a dearth at the moment until maybe September and I check the corn and soybean fields and have never seen bees feeding in either. So Bernhard you should ask yourself what are your farmers and beekeepers doing in Germany that is different to what most successful beekeepers are doing in the USA. I have seen references made about the Europeans use a far higher dosage of neonics than the American farmers do.
    Johno

  15. #94

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    The difference is landscape. We don't have the open country and wildnerness you have. We are crowded here and little to no nature is left. Also rain and ground water is different here.

    At the time corn is flowering there is not much else out there for the bees. No nectar flow at all and only little pollen from other plants. At times corn pollen makes up 70-90 % of total pollen consumption. A steady flow of light yellow pollen.

    Being so crowded here, we have the following situation.

    I) Germany has 357,167.94 km˛ - that are 357,167,940,000 m˛.

    II) 100 tons of one neonic alone: Imidacloprid are applicated here each year - that equals 100.000.000.000 mg per year. 220462.2621848776 pounds.

    III) Divide this all over Germany and you get 0.279980336421 mg per square meter.

    IV) 0.279980336421 mg are 279,980.336421 ng. Per square meter!

    V) The chronic-lethal dosis (LD50 chronic) for bees is 0.01-1 ng per honeybee. (Suchail et al. 2001)

    And that is only one neonic.

    That is simply an "overkill". Probably the stuff dilutes into your open space country where you live. Here it builds up and concentrates more and more.

    How much is totally applied in your country, let's say Imidacloprid and what is the overall acreage?

    There must be differences because of the different observations. Sure. But we know exactly what is causing our problems. We did our homework.

  16. #95
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,742

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Here is a link to newspaper article on Canadian ovewinter losses. I was surprised to see starvation listed as #1 cause. Not necessarily very scientific.

    http://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/16-8-of-...inds-1.2998795
    Frank

  17. #96
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,716

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    This is another story that does not seem to support the theory that neonics are the cause of all the bee problems. A great deal of Canadians put their bees into neonic raised canola without many bee losses, but then again canola pollen is high in protein and is supposed to be good for bee nutrition. Neonics might just speed up the demise of under nourished bees, just a thought.
    Johno

  18. #97
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    1,716

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    neonic bees.jpgBernhardt, From a thread you posted on another forum in which you mention the amount of your harvest makes it hard to believe you have starving bees feeding on corn pollen. https://www.beesource.com/forums/show...parently/page6
    I have one harvest a year with nectar flow of about 6 weeks in the spring and still my bees do not feed on corn pollen.
    I know our bees will go to sweetcorn but there are no neonics used here on sweetcorn.
    Johno

  19. #98

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Michael Palmer, I just saw your presentation on wintering in the North. Well, what shall I say. You say, we don't have a clue what wintering in the North means. True. But I was not only amazed about the snow pile pictures and morning doves, I also was in awe about the blooming meadows and fields and how long your nectar season is compared to ours.

    You sure not know what it means to keep bees in the green deserts as we don't know not much about wintering in the far North.

    PS: Your comment about insulation: Don't forget that somewhere else there is winter but no snow. Just frost and freezing, but no snow. With all the snow piled up on the hives, you have tons of insulation. Low temperatures and no snow = no insulation is a different matter.

  20. #99
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    10,148

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    journaling the growth of a (mite) treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  21. #100

    Default Re: CCD/Neonicotinoid Data (Studies, Articles, Links)

    Combined neonicotinoid pesticide and parasite stress alter honeybee queens’ physiology and survival
    Claudia Dussaubat, Alban Maisonnasse, Didier Crauser, Sylvie Tchamitchian, Marc Bonnet, Marianne Cousin, André Kretzschmar, Jean-Luc Brunet*& Yves Le Conte
    Scientific Reports 6, Article*number:*31430 (2016)
    doi:10.1038/srep31430
    Published online: 31 August 2016

    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep31430

    Abstract
    Honeybee colony survival strongly relies on the queen to overcome worker losses exposed to combined stressors like pesticides and parasites. Queen’s capacity to withstand these stressors is however very little known. The effects of the common neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid in a chronic and sublethal exposure together with the wide distributed parasite Nosema ceranae have therefore been investigated on queen’s physiology and survivorship in laboratory and field conditions. Early physiological changes were observed on queens, particularly the increase of enzyme activities (catalase [CAT] and glutathione-S-transferase [GST] in the heads) related to protective responses to xenobiotics and oxidative stress against pesticide and parasite alone or combined. Stressors also alter the activity of two other enzymes (carboxylesterase alpha [CaE α] and carboxylesterase para [CaE p] in the midguts) involved in metabolic and detoxification functions. Furthermore, single and combined effects of pesticide and parasite decrease survivorship of queens introduced into mating hives for three months. Because colony demographic regulation relies on queen’s fertility, the compromise of its physiology and life can seriously menace colony survival under pressure of combined stressors.

Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •