How do you react to a sting - Page 3
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 73
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    3,112

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    involuntary eye lid muscles are faster than a bee,
    I would still hate to get stung on the eyelid, or the bags under my eyes. I could imagine looking like a cyclops for a week or more.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    34,541

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    I know, but it isn't that bad. Wasn't for me anyway. The worst part was getting the stinger out. It's kinda hard to look at an eyelid w/ the eye closed. Plus droopy eye syndrome.
    Mark Berninghausen

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,527

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Ive had them fly right at and hit me in the eye. Blink reflex is faster than they can plant the sting.
    Zone 5 @ 4700 ft. High Desert

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Funny thing about stings, you just never know how your body will respond. My husband has been around bees since he was little. Last august he took a little sting to the hand, 10 minutes later i was screaming through traffic in route to the E.R. He was having an aniphilactic(?) reaction. His lips were swolen, he felt sick he had hives all over his body and he was fire red, even the whites of his eyes. It was terrifying to say the least. He has been stung twice since then with no reaction accept an itchy palm. We carry epi pens everywhere, they are in every car and drawer in the house. I got stung next to my tear duct last summer and nothing for 2 days. Day 3 i woke up with my eyebrow area and my nose so swollen i looked like a klingon. it took 2 more days for the swelling to go down, i looked lovely! The best thing is to just keep an epi pen around when you have bees, most physicians will give you an rx for it if they know you are a beekeeper.

    Kris
    Medford, Oregon

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    My verbal reactions are always the same : Son of a peach! and i walk about 15 feet away so the bananna smell doesn't insight a small riot!

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chicago,Ill.
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    How you remove the stinger ,will make a differance . After a honybee stings, the stinger and venom sack is left in place,and the bee flys off to die. When removeing stinger donot grab by the white sack, that will only inject more bee venom. Bees sting on an angle and so scrapping side ways with a card or your hive tool will work better than grabbing at it, it only makes it worse.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    John C that sounds like a pattern of increasing sting reactions, and with the hives on your hand from an ear sting it is getting to the point that would be classified as "allergic." I had that happen last year and eventually had about 50% of my body covered in hives before I was diagnosed as allergic and treated with allergy shots. I would get an epi-pen now in case your next reaction is worse in the life-threatening sense.

    This year having completed the desensitization I'm stinging myself weekly and seeing steadily decreasing reactions, to the point that it still swells a bit but doesn't really bother me.

    Desensitization is just a series of bee venom injections of increasing dosage, starting at around 1/10000 of a sting and doubling weekly. If you are not allergic but have a pattern of increasing reactions, you could try desensitizing yourself. First get an epi-pen in case you do develop a full-blown allergic reaction. Then start by pulling a fresh stinger out of your glove, suit, etc., and stick it in your skin. It will have very little venom left but should still sting. Do that weekly for a few weeks, then move to a real bee but scrape the stinger off immediately. Gradually leave the stinger in longer until you can leave it in for five minutes and still have a minimal reaction. There is pretty solid medical evidence that frequent (weekly to monthly) stings decrease the tendency toward allergy and decrease the severity of sting reactions, due to an increase in the ratio of good (IgG) to bad (IgE) bee venom antibodies.

    Mark

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    3,112

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by Luterra View Post
    Desensitization is just a series of bee venom injections of increasing dosage, starting at around 1/10000 of a sting and doubling weekly. If you are not allergic but have a pattern of increasing reactions, you could try desensitizing yourself. First get an epi-pen in case you do develop a full-blown allergic reaction. Then start by pulling a fresh stinger out of your glove, suit, etc., and stick it in your skin.
    Umm... if one had a problem with bee stings, I would recommend going to a medical doctor (allergist) and forego any attempt at DIY desensitization. It's kinda hard to meter out 1/0000 of a sting using household equipment.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Riverhead,NY,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    I have different reactions every time I get stung. They range from just the initial pain and nothing else to slight swelling that spreads a couple inches from the sting site and is sore for a day or two. I have found that I react less to Italian stings than I do from other breeds. But that could just be my imagination, i haven't heard anything else that would prove that to be true or not.

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Baytown, TX., USA.
    Posts
    641

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Bees seem to know when I am up tight and get that way themselves. Generally I just drop it and calm down and they do to. I have squeezed one on occasion and got stung. Sometimes one or two will just be very upset, I just back off and let them cool off. Always worry that I will slap myself in the face with a hive tool or such. I don't swell up much but jump and dance a bit. I try not to go past where they will let me or faster than they allow. Funny how my son-in-law can be standing back watching and get hit. He swells up for days.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Riverhead,NY,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Oh and I always carry a EpiPen with me just in case something crazy happens or my ole lady gets stung badly cause she swells up instantly when she gets stung. I just told my doctor I was a beekeeper and he wrote me a prescription for one just in case.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,940

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    They were lined up on the inside top of the frames like F-4's on the deck of an aircraft carrier.
    A sure sign they are ready for a fight and are not distracted by anything, giving you their full attention...

  14. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by Nabber86 View Post
    Umm... if one had a problem with bee stings, I would recommend going to a medical doctor (allergist) and forego any attempt at DIY desensitization. It's kinda hard to meter out 1/0000 of a sting using household equipment.
    Note that I only suggested DIY desensitization for folks without bee allergies. Starting with tiny dosages is necessary in cases of severe allergy but when the only consequence is pain there is no real need to be precise. Uncomfortable as it sounds, one solution to painful sting reactions is to get stung more often, with "more often" in this context being on the order of once a week. It works (usually) for the same reason that allergy shots (usually) work. Irregular exposure can generate IgE antibodies, which tell the body "foreign proteins present, must be an infection, time to fight it!" Regular, frequent exposure generates IgG antibodies which signal "oh here comes the bee venom again, nothing to worry about." Some of the IgGs even bind directly to the IgEs and inhibit them. The end result is less painful sting reactions.

    Of course we are dealing with the human immune system for which no rules always apply. I'm sure there are some people who could be stung weekly for years and still swell every time.

    Mark

  15. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by lissa View Post
    I read to try using an antihistimine, which I've done, putting tobacco on it, which I also tried, and using a baking soda paste to draw out some of the poison, which I have also tried...but the end result is the same. Still swells, turns red, itches, and feels hot. These are normal reactions as far as I'm concerned but would like to know how to treat it.
    My wife puts a dab of honey on everything. BTW her name is Lesa.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  16. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Southern MD
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    glad to see I am not the only one that will do a drive by and have to lift the top to look in. 99% of the time no issue but once in a while all heck breaks loose, best is when you have to run off and leave your truck behind.

    I have nice bees, had one hive you could not drive by with in 40 feet they would attack, nature took care of them and they died

  17. #56
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristen beck View Post
    Funny thing about stings, you just never know how your body will respond. My husband has been around bees since he was little. Last august he took a little sting to the hand, 10 minutes later i was screaming through traffic in route to the E.R. He was having an aniphilactic(?) reaction. His lips were swolen, he felt sick he had hives all over his body and he was fire red, even the whites of his eyes. It was terrifying to say the least. He has been stung twice since then with no reaction accept an itchy palm. We carry epi pens everywhere, they are in every car and drawer in the house. I got stung next to my tear duct last summer and nothing for 2 days. Day 3 i woke up with my eyebrow area and my nose so swollen i looked like a klingon. it took 2 more days for the swelling to go down, i looked lovely! The best thing is to just keep an epi pen around when you have bees, most physicians will give you an rx for it if they know you are a beekeeper.

    Kris
    Medford, Oregon

    I work in healthcare and I understand that allergic reactions can be a progressive thing. People may have an allergy that they were unaware of and it may take a few stings for it to get worse with each sting. For this reason I have 2 Epipens in my kit in case anything happens to me or anyone I'm near the hive with. Better to be careful than to end up dead in the yard.

  18. #57
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    3,112

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by Luterra View Post
    It works (usually) for the same reason that allergy shots (usually) work. Irregular exposure can generate IgE antibodies, which tell the body "foreign proteins present, must be an infection, time to fight it!" Regular, frequent exposure generates IgG antibodies which signal "oh here comes the bee venom again, nothing to worry about." Some of the IgGs even bind directly to the IgEs and inhibit them.

    Of course we are dealing with the human immune system for which no rules always apply. I'm sure there are some people who could be stung weekly for years and still swell every time.

    Mark
    Yes I understand your argument, but then there is also the progressive side of allergen exposure that indicates multiple exposures lead to worsening effects that can lead to full-blown anaphylaxis shock. With uncontrolled DYI treatments, the imune system can back-fire and develop too much of a good thing, as in "oh here comes the bee venom again, nothing to worry about but let's respond with a full blown nuclear attack, at the expense of the body that we are trying to defend".

    From Medline: "Although first-time exposure may only produce a mild reaction, repeated exposures may lead to more serious reactions. Once a person has had an exposure or an allergic reaction (is sensitized), even a very limited exposure to a very small amount of allergen can trigger a severe reaction."

    Either way, I would recommend professional treatment, especially in a public internet forum......
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  19. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by Nabber86 View Post
    Either way, I would recommend professional treatment, especially in a public internet forum......
    That is probably the right thing to do. However, most doctors won't consider "professional treatment" (i.e. desensitization shots) unless you have a history of allergic response. Based on a fairly thorough review of scientific literature relating to bee allergy and sting response, I'm convinced that there are two ways to minimize both painful swelling and the potential for allergy development:
    1. Never get stung.
    2. Get stung really often (~weekly, with no more than a month between stings).

    As #1 didn't work for me, I'm trying #2 and have had good success so far.

    I'd be interested to hear from any beekeepers who are stung very often but still have painful swelling in response to each sting, or who developed an allergy after years of weekly-to-monthly stings. If there are lots of folks out there that fit this description, I might have to reconsider my theory.

    Mark

  20. #59
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bayboro,NC,USA
    Posts
    324

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    A sure sign they are ready for a fight and are not distracted by anything, giving you their full attention...
    NasalSponge, You got that right,,,When they do that they are past the "ON THE MARK, GET SET" they are just waiting for the "GO".

    I think I got it figured out what's gotten them all ticked off, I think something at night is pestering them. I have a 5 gallon bucket with water in it about 10 feet from them, I placed a blue handtowel across one side of the bucket and laid the rest of it inside the bucket to wick up the water so they could drink and not drown. They use it alot. Several mornings I have gone to my truck to go to work and noticed that the towel has been pulled out of the bucket and was laying beside it. What ever it is has gotten them REALLY, REALLY TICKED OFF. I'm going to set up a trail camera and see if I can tell what it is and then set a trap for it.
    Last edited by dadandsonsbees; 05-16-2012 at 10:42 AM.

  21. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Stilwell, KS
    Posts
    3,112

    Default Re: How do you react to a sting

    Quote Originally Posted by Luterra View Post
    That is probably the right thing to do. However, most doctors won't consider "professional treatment" (i.e. desensitization shots) unless you have a history of allergic response.
    That's not what I have found to be the case. Any doctor will test you for allergies and will be more than happy to provide professional desensitizing treatment.


    Quote Originally Posted by Luterra View Post
    Based on a fairly thorough review of scientific literature relating to bee allergy and sting response, I'm convinced that there are two ways to minimize both painful swelling and the potential for allergy development:

    1. Never get stung.
    2. Get stung really often (~weekly, with no more than a month between stings).
    In your thorough review of the scientific literature you overlooked option #3 – receiving desensitization shots from an allergy clinic.


    Quote Originally Posted by Luterra View Post
    I'd be interested to hear from any beekeepers who are stung very often but still have painful swelling in response to each sting, or who developed an allergy after years of weekly-to-monthly stings. If there are lots of folks out there that fit this description, I might have to reconsider my theory.
    I think you will find that very few people develop severe allergies after years of weekly-to-monthly stings and you will get plenty anecdotal accounts supporting this. And I am sure you will use the information support your theory to try and prove me wrong.

    But that wasn’t my point. All I am saying is that the threat is still there, however low it may be, and it is well-documented in the field of immunology.

    Again, I recommend leaving the desensitizing to the professionals. You can do as you please. It’s your life.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •