First stings delayed reaction - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Tucson, AZ
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    7

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    I also recently installed packages for the first time. I did it at night with no protection. I didn't expect them to crawl up my legs underneath my pants. The first swipe resulted in a sting. Another bee went down my shirt...another swipe caused another sting. I started learning not to swipe. The third sting was on my arm after I pinched a bee against the box accidentally.

    The leg sting swelled up a couple of inches and was painful all night. I woke up if I rolled over and that part of my leg touched the bed. The chest sting and the arm sting swelled less than very small button and were gone in less than an hour.

    Tonight I was out releasing the queen and got a quick sting on the hand. No swelling whatsoever, just a little itching an hour and a half later.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Johnson,Missouri,USA
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    25

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    I agree Aerindel. Epi can be a potentially dangerous drug and I would caution anyone thinking about keeping one around to administer to someone to whom it was not prescribed. Prescription drugs are intended to be taken by only the person receiving the prescription. Just my two cents.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
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    1,300

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by A10fuelfxr View Post
    Prescription drugs are intended to be taken by only the person receiving the prescription.
    In most states, there are "good samaritan laws" protecting any well-meaning, non-medically-licensed people from being sued for trying to help somebody who gets hurt/sick/whatever. That said, most "good samaritan laws" do NOT cover anything criminal that you do...dispensing prescription medications without a license, or prescription directing it to be used as it was used, on the person it was used on, is (I think) a felony act; which then opens you up to the possibility of both being sued, and going to jail. That said, if it IS an actual "life or death" scenario, sometimes it's worth it to save a life, but I can't make that decision for you, jsut help you be informed about making it yourself.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arlee MT USA
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    547

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Don't get me wrong, epi is a good drug and can save lives but like all drugs you HAVE to know when to use it, wether you are licensed or not you can be sued for misusing it on another person.

    Hypothetically if you have an epi pen and someone else nearby starts having a sever allergic reaction the safest thing to do (legally) is to offer them the pen and inform them that if they use it that it is their responsibility. Its not iron clad legal protection but it will help if it goes to court.

    If the person has lost consciousness and you truly feel that this is a life or death situation the very best thing to do is to call your nearest ER and ask for medical control. The 911 dispatcher usually does not have the authority to tell you to use epi. However, asking for medical control will give you a direct line to an ER doctor without any waiting or the usually screwing around. Tell them that the ambulance is on the way and tell them exactly what is happening. Only use this for an absolute medical emergency. This is the red telephone of the hospital that connects directly the highest authority.

    Medical control DOES have the authority to instruct you to administer epi even if its for someone other than the prescription is written for. You will be operating under the doctors license and his malpractice insurance which will offer a great deal of protection PROVIDED that you have already called 911 and that you follow the doctors instructions precisely.

    The signs and symptoms of a true anaphylactic shock are unmistakeable and it is extremely unlikely that you will be prosecuted for any treatment you provide IF it is indeed shock. Before you consider doing such a thing do everything you can to learn the symptoms and how to distinguish them from a mild reaction or a panic attack.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Liberty, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    178

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Only beekeepers could turn this into a conversation more anal than a group of pharmacists. Do what ye will. I do not go through my life worrying about good sumaratin laws and felony convictions. I will have to look into it, but at least in Indiana, I don't think you would be looking at a felony. An epi-pen is what is called a "legend drug". Getting caught with that would be about the same as having your grandma's blood pressure medicine. The police are calling all of the time for me to identify pills that they pick up on people. I will ask......

    If you don't help someone clearly having an anaphylactic reaction, because you are afraid of "the law", you can live with that. If someone is truely anaphylactic and you are more than 15-20 minutes from medical aid, you can call 911. Let us all know how it works out for you and the poor SOB that you first see turning pink, then blue. I will take my chances.

    There is a lot of diversion of medications out there. The police don't have enough resources to keep the controlled medications from being diverted. Epi-pens are going to be low on the totem pole. They are a medication, and you need to not inject the thing in your thumb, but I have known of 8 year olds who carry them everywhere due to sensitive allergies. It's not rocket science.
    Jason Bruns
    LetMBee.com YouTube

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    brownwood, TX, USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    My son coaches a 12 year old girl that keeps an epipen on her person 24/7 when out doors. As stated above, it must not be rocket science. This is in Texas. There is a group of neighborhood kids that swim in my pool. One of them carries an epipen with him. My yard is saturated with yellowjackets and bees. If he was to go into shock before using the epipen, I will inject him with his epi.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Outagamie County, Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    1,214

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    If I was a parent of a child who needed an epi pen to deal with a life threatening bee sting, I would have them go thru the desensitization process so eventually having that epi pen with them at all times would no longer be necessary.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Corvallis, OR
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    The topic of epi-pens comes up on BeeSource fairly regularly, with arguments as to 1) whether it is a good idea to have one if you're not allergic and 2) whether it is OK to use your epi-pen on someone else experiencing an allergic reaction.

    I posted this back in February, and it is relevant here:
    The risk of adverse reaction from Epi-Pen injection is relatively low. Of nearly 16,000 accidental Epi-Pen injections reported to poison control centers, about 8% obtained medical treatment (mostly due to injection into a bad location such as a finger). 0.2% reported "severe effects." There was no mention of any fatalities. There have been two reports of direct injection into fingers ultimately requiring amputation due to vasoconstriction, though such effects are very rare even with accidental finger injections.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20159254

    The risk of death from untreated anaphylaxis is quite high, in the sense that 40-50 people die from sting reactions in the US each year. Roughly half of these people had no previous history of reaction, and so likely had no Epi-Pen on hand. Legal issues aside, I would not hesitate to use my pen on someone who was clearly experiencing a reaction.
    Epi-pens may suffer from frequent unnecessary/accidental use, but realistically when you give children a sharp object and tell them to carry it at all times, accidents are going to happen. I'm not convinced that there will be a high frequency of unnecessary use among beekeepers. Beekeepers know what a normal sting reaction looks and feels like, and when someone is getting hives (the red, itchy kind) all over or having trouble breathing that is when it's good to have an epi-pen handy and know how to use it.

    That said, there is at least one BeeSource member who is hypersensitive to epinephrine, and for whom an epi-pen injection might be as dangerous as anaphylaxis.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Andover, KS
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Okay Shiela, I just found your post because I searched for "itching bee sting after a week." I am a beginning beekeeper and I was actually already a member here on beesource. Exactly 7 days ago, I received two minor stings through my clothes while doing a huge cut-out of a feral hive by myself which was also my very first experience with any bees, let alone, 20,000 of them. Needless to say, after reading this entire thread, I am now a bit concerned about future stings. I was wondering if you have received stings since and how you reacted when you got them. I wanted to get an epi-pen but they only come in a 2-pack now and they're like $260! For something that saves lives, these things should be free. Anyway, please let me know how your future stings went. Thanks.

    - John

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
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    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    John,

    The primary use for an epi-pen is to "buy time" until an orally administered dose of benadryl, or other fast-acting antihistamine will take effect. With that said, I personally take benadryl FIRST, before I get into a situation where I am likely to get stung; that way, if I *were* going to have an anaphylactic type reaction, I already have the antihistamine working, so the reaction stays local, and milder.

    As a former medical professional, I must ask that you NOT take my opinion, or what I do as medical advice. It's simply what I do myself, as an informed individual; what you do yourself is a personal decision, and should be made in an informed manner, preferably with input from your physician.

  12. #31
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    Jun 2012
    Location
    Spicewood, Texas, USA
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    235

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Sheila:
    Were you ever tested for bee venom allergy? I went to an allergist, got tested, tested negative but was given an epi-pen just to be safe.

    Sondra

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    brownwood, TX, USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Dang, It is so impressive that your first ever experience with bees was performing a cut-out. Second, If epi-pens save lives for $260.00, they are dirt cheap. It's still amazing to me that you or anyone else would expect someone to provide you a free epi-pen. Who goes begging so that you can have an epi-pen?

    Thirdly, I would at least visit with my family doctor if a bee sting itched for a week. Some of my family members swell and inch for a couple of days, but a week is the longest I have heard of anyone itching from a bee sting. Be careful. Good luck. Congrats of being a rough and rowdy ready to brawl cutout guy.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    John,

    I was very worried about it as well after everything I got as a response here. But I love my bees so I went in again of course. I few months later I did get stung again. (I must say I always make sure there is someone nearby when I'm in my hives) that second time I immediately took an antihistamine. I had an initial reaction of the regular itching but nothing more after that. So now I just make sure I have an antihistamine near by and I'm good. I hope that answers your question.

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    If you tell your doctor you are a beekeeper, they will give you a prescription for an epi pen. Insurance will cover it. My stings always take several weeks to heal completely, but taking benydryl right away helps. Epi pen is for super emergency, someone can't breath,.they need help right away before an ambulance can arrive. Chances are, you will never need an epi pen. Pain does not require am epi pen.

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Andover, KS
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Okay, thanks Shiela. That gives me a little comfort, especially since I will be visiting a commercial apiary this weekend. I'm sure someone will have an epi-pen there, but I really hope I don't have any sort of crazy reaction if I get stung. Good grief, leave it to me to be allergic to my own bees. I was even hoping to do some bee sting therapy for my arthritis.

    - Qualtelmon, I would gladly pick up an epi-pen except the health insurance that I have does not cover them at all. It all comes out of my pocket. I will keep looking to see if I can find some cheaper than $260.

  17. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,774

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Once in a while I get bad swelling. Twice I've had my ankle sweel so much I could barely walk. There is a reason it's called "venom"... but usually, after all these years, I can't find where I got stung five minutes later...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Haysi, VA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Sheila View Post
    Hello all,

    Easter weekend my mom and I got our first packages and installed them. We didn't have much of a problem installing them besides the 3 (well deserved) stings I got. I didn't have much of a reaction to the stings at first. I was actually relieved at how little it actually hurt. Exactly a week later one of the spots I got stung swelled up, turned red, and itched extremely bad! At the time I figured I had a spider bite or something. The next day the 2 other spots did the same thing and that's when I realized it must have had something to do with the bee stings. My mom also got stung once that day but she didn't have any reaction at all.

    So, my questions is, has anyone else had this happen? Should I be concerned?

    Thanks all,

    Sheila
    I get itching and swelling after 24 hours. Usually when I wake up. Its super bad. A woman told me a applachia remedy where u take vinegar and wrap it around the sting for a few minutes and I thought it wouldn't work but after a few hours of itching I caved. Idk how it does it but it works. It wouldn't hurt to try but I swear by it.

  19. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    NE SD
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    87

    Default Re: First stings delayed reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by DPLONG View Post
    Sometimes a sting site on my body will get really itchy around day 3. It doesn't happen all the time, usually on my inner upper arm or anywhere there is softer tissue. I don't have any immediate reactions, just the itching 2 to 3 days later and sometimes it really sucks. Make sure you get the stingers out and I would carry and epipen just in case. I always have one in my truck.
    I'm like you, usually takes 24-36 hrs for any reaction at all. Then I get a big red 12" ring around the sting and some fluid retention in that area. I got one last sunday on my bicep, through my suit!! It swelled down past my elbow and my tricep looked like an old ladies all jiggly with fluid in it.

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