Splitting and not moving new hive - Page 3
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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Huntington ,VT, USA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: Splitting and not moving new hive

    Agreed. No matter how good your genetics a poorly nourished larva would seem at a disadvantage. I have heard the concerns over e-queens but do not have experience to speak to that, although I think the greater concern I have read is the age of the larva when chosen (if no eggs available) and not necessarily the available feed. You can get a e-queen in a strong well stocked hive.

    Selecting traits to propagate in any species is a crap shoot, especially for the hobbyist. As you point out you may well unknowingly sacrifice desirable traits that are not showing under the conditions during selection. But unless you are willing to go "random", the best you can do is select from those genetics that seem to demonstrate what you want. For most, a large strong productive colony would seems a good indicator.

    The pros obviously have the numbers, experience, and time to make a more educated decision.

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,139

    Default Re: Splitting and not moving new hive

    I've actually combined hives, (the queenless on top) without newspaper only because I couldn't find any to use. They were more confused than anything else, no problems. I've also taken brood frames with nurse bees on and have just placed them into a weaker hives
    with no problems. I didn't know you weren't suppose to do that. (Of course you make sure the queen is not tagging along).
    My opinions are based on a decade of beekeeping, book learning and watching YouTube videos.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: Splitting and not moving new hive

    Quote Originally Posted by windfall View Post
    For most, a large strong productive colony would seems a good indicator.
    In the commercial aspect but in the hobbyist aspect survivability might be more desirable. It is for me anyways. So what if the hive produces less honey, just add another hive.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,550

    Default Re: Splitting and not moving new hive

    >for that matter, that nucs could be made from several hives by simply picking and combining brood frames with bees all at once?

    I try to get them from at least three different hives if doing this as the added confusion helps with them not taking sides.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  6. #45
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,274

    Default Re: Splitting and not moving new hive

    I've made thousands of nucs and often use brood frames from a couple/three or four different hives. They DO NOT fight! Maybe it's a case of confusion, don't know. Fighting occurs due to robbing, but not when introducing frames of bees and brood into another hive. We also often boost weak hives by transferring frames of brood with bees to the weak hive. If fighting was normal when making splits, how the heck would you ever make an increase? If fighting was normal why do we get drifting, with tons of bees from many separate hives occupying the favored end spot? Old wives tale, easily dismissed by making a split and observing!!!

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