Why some beekeepers fail - Page 5
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  1. #81
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Maybe it's mites. I get them mixed up. heh,heh
    I understand that hops are now being used to treat for mites. You should treat yourself with a remedy using hops as an ingredient.

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  3. #82
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Systemically? Or propholactically? How do you know I haven't been already?
    Mark Berninghausen

  4. #83
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    Hamilton, Alabama
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    From a strict standpoint, all humans have a type of mites. they are microscopic and are commonly found just beneath the skin on eyelashes. Delve around on the net and you will find reference to them.

    DarJones
    NW Alabama, 50 years, 20 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  5. #84
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Not to mention the ones under your couch eating all those pieces of skin you loose every day.
    Mark Berninghausen

  6. #85
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Dewey View Post
    BeeGhost - there is no dollar amount below which you don't have to report to the IRS.
    Thanks for the insight Andrew!! I will keep that in mind if I get some extra honey to sell next year!! I know I dont want to get into trouble with the IRS, ive been there once when I was 22...........changed my claim to exempt and forgot to change it back after a couple checks (actually, the money was to good to change back!) and I ended up oweing $3000+ dollars to the IRS..............that sucked. That cut into my beer money!!
    Coyote Creek Bees

  7. #86
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Why some beekeepers fail, maybe it should read why most beekeepers fail/---JUST TOO LAZY TO DO WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE.-That is the short and long of it-PERIOD. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  8. #87
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Beekeeping is a guaranteed enerprise as long as you are willing to work, right Ted? I wonder how many comercial bee businesses there are that the owner making 6 figures doesn't work the bees?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  9. #88
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    If we define still being a beekeeper as not failing, I may know a little about that.

    I believe the single most important thing is the correct mindset. Anyone that believes they know more about bees than the bees do, is destined to fail. If you open a hive with the intent of making them do what you want them to do, you will fail. If you open the hive to see what they are telling you they need, you will succeed.

    Roland Diehnelt
    5th Gen. comnmercial beekeeper.(Christian is 6th gen)
    Linden Apiary, Est. 1852
    I enjoy walking into the Hamilton Office of Dadant and calling them "rookies", with respect.

  10. #89
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Ace, What you get in return for your work when working with honeybees is directly proportional to how much work you put into them. It is the same as any small business. And Ace, Even though I have a couple of employees, I am working bees manual. You think I would trust my help to do the job exactly the way I want it-forget it. You will find most commercial beeks are working out in the bees. Even Richard Adee dons the bee veil at critical times. Roland is right, you have to have the right mindset also. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  11. #90
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Defining failure as failure to take hold, or in other words giving up, I think that new beekeepers fail because of the expense involved of repeatedly having to buy packages.
    This is because the methods taught on an average introductory course set a beekeeper up to use chemical methods to control mites, and these chemical methods do not fit into many new beekeepers' world view.

  12. #91
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    And the average beekeeper that is brand new also does not have the beekeeping skill level to adapt chemical free methods either. So Adrian, what does a new beekeeper do then? I would suggest starting with something else beside packages. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  13. #92
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    There are a number of businesses that don't require "working in the business" to become profitable and sustainable. Franchises require a lot of hands on work to start but if you have the business sense they require very little hands on work to sustain. Most businesses owners are motivated to this goal.
    Beekeeping appears to be "nobody can replace me" attitude and that is a non sustaining business. So I would have to say that the attitude "nobody can replace me" is a big factor in beekeeping failures.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  14. #93
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Acebird,
    Were you a Chef, you would not turn all cooking responsibilities over to hired help and never go back on the line and cook. Beekeeping, and Farming in general, is one of those businesses wherein the Boss, the Owner, knows the business, and enjoys the work and likes being where the action is, where the hands on work is done.

    I don't know any beekeepers in NYS who don't have hands like the ones you will see in Michael Palmer's photos in the "How do you catch a queen?" Thread.

    Some people, older people who can no longer work bees as well as they once could have will still get out in their bees. I don't see why this is difficult to understand. Or, maybe you are just asking questions to stimulate conversation again?
    Mark Berninghausen

  15. #94
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Kretschmann View Post
    And the average beekeeper that is brand new also does not have the beekeeping skill level to adapt chemical free methods either. So Adrian, what does a new beekeeper do then? I would suggest starting with something else beside packages. TED
    The above post defines my bee delemma. I had thought of bee keeping for the past few years, as a "good thing" to do for the environment. My ranch is to a great degree a toxic free operation. I don't inject cattle with anything, and I don't use herbicides or pesticides. If the army worms show up, they get to eat my cover crops. That's OK, as in my twilight years I can afford to feed the worms. My angus cattle are sold to a “free range marketing group” for slaughter.
    With the above qualifier, a friend of mine found three complete bee hives three with deeps and 12 mediums that were filled with new frames with all the bells and whistles. The purchase price was only 250 bucks.

    I bought them in the late fall and found out it was time to immediately purchase bees. I purchased three packages from an old and well established apiary in Texas. I read a wee bit and watched some bee package installations on the internet found myself in the bee business. Then came the drought and feeding and robbing and …..

    Of course, it was my intention to raise chemical free bees. Eight months into this venture, my bees are still chemical free. What I didn’t understand, was that bees die and need to be replaced. To do this one needs to understand the various methods of making splits, rearing queens, installing new queens, formulating nucs and yada, yada, yada…….

    Beekeeping has become a lot more learning intensive than I ever envisioned. Let me emphasize that I mean a LOT more learning intensive. Hey, at 72 years of age, I can afford to buy queens, nucs and the other essentials to raise chemical free bees, so you folks haven’t seen the last of me. But, I think Ted’s above quote is one reason we lose a lot of “would-be” beekeepers.

  16. #95
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    sqkcrk, I find it amazing that you are offended that I might post an "In your opinion" unqualified comment. But you have no hesitation to think you can speak for all farmers. In fact I have an uncle that spent his entire life farming 4 sections of Kansas his entire life. And hated it. That farm was inherited in the past few years by his daughter. She loves farming and it is actually the only career she ever hoped to have. She turned the farm over to one of her cousins and his family and operates a flower shop. Maybe you should have done a little more reading on something before you spoke. or maybe owned a business or something. I am not really sure what you would consider adequate qualifications in this case. From what I can tell you need to go buy some more bees. Owning bees seems to be your only measure of a persons knowledge.

    Actually Ace is correct in his point. I would say it more like Beekeeping is heavily dependent on one person and the knowledge they posses and the quality of the decisions they make. Where other businesses may depend on a network of people all with portions of the knowledge and skills required. It is true that most business owners understand that you do not get "Rich" by working for money. and since their objective is to make money they tend toward a hands off method of business ownership. This is not an across the board way business is done. it is just one way. It happens to be the way my cousin is running her 4 square miles of farm and will soon be the way she runs her flower shop. Hopefully she will return to a more active roll in the farm since that is where she is happy. But what makes you happy and what you do for your business seldom have anything to do with each other.
    Last edited by Daniel Y; 01-01-2012 at 09:44 AM.

  17. #96
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    2600 years ago Lao Tzu said..."if an unskilled person tries to cut wood like a master carpenter, he will only succeed in cutting his hand".

    The same has got to be true for beekeeping...there are going to those first years where you just don't have a clue...and then there are going be a few years where the weather, bees, your own health, and "circumstances' just win out.

    My grandpa kept bees for 75 years he said..."success comes from having enough patience to succeed."

  18. #97
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Ace has TWO hives of bees and at the most TWO years of experience. So I ask you Daniel, how many hives do you have. There is NO comparison between the management of TWO hives AND TWO Thousand. Most commercial beekeepers and for that matter most smaller beekeepers FAIL when they do not get out and manage their bees personally. You can not depend on the hired help to do it right. You do it or the business literally dies. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  19. #98
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Since bee businesses are usually family run and maintained enterprises, most eventually have the three generational curse. Granddaddy started the business and built it up. Dad expanded it and maintained it. And the Kids, well they usually want NO part of the bee business, so they usually "whiz" it away. It is a rare operation indeed that goes for generations. Several members of these operations post regularly and irregularly on Beesource. They are the backbone of the industry. It is these people that new beekeepers should try to emulate and ask questions. By doing so, they will learn much and prevent failure. NOT somebody with two hive and two years experience. Heck, they, themselves are still learning and larvae in the honeycomb cell. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  20. #99
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Kretschmann View Post
    Why some beekeepers fail, maybe it should read why most beekeepers fail/---JUST TOO LAZY TO DO WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE.-That is the short and long of it-PERIOD. TED
    Amen to that one, Ted -- in my short time working with bees and beeks, I have seen that the folks who lose interest the most quickly are those who go into beekeeping with a romanticized idea that they will be able to have happy little bees buzzing in their gardens WITHOUT DOING ANYTHING beyond setting up a hive or two. I have acquired several complete hive bodies and some odds-and-ends equipment from people who gave up after a single season ..... they didn't get any honey and their bees weren't pollinating the flowers and/or vegetables like they expected (one lady was surrounded by acres of privet, honeysuckle, blackberry, and cotton fields - and did not understand why her flower garden had so few bees visiting it!). Heck, I'm just beginning to understand that I have gotten myself into a retirement hobby that is more work than my previous job! It just happens to be so interesting that I have yet to stop wanting to learn more - sometimes from failures - and do more.

  21. #100
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    As to my grandpa...he probably never had more than $1,000 in the bank at anytime in his 81 years of life...BUT, he was also the happiest person I have ever known. He has always been my measure of true success.

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