Why some beekeepers fail - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    AHB is a hybrid between a domestic bee and a wild bee.
    Define "wild" and tell me which ones were used to produce AHB. Are AHB domesticated? I didn't ask you if they were a hybrid or not. Are AHB domesticated?

    Were the bees crossed w/ domestic bees kept by beekeepers? How was the hybrid produced?
    Mark Berninghausen

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  3. #62
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    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Ace - sounds to me like he is in a pretty good position to judge the merits of his own plan. What you may not realize yet is that you can either grow aggressively or you can try to make a profit, but doing both at the same time is likely to be an unrealistic expectation. Aggresive growth is an investment.

  4. #63
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    It is not about bees, it is about running a business.
    A cattle rancher is not a cattle rancher. He is a grass farmer. Cows just happen to be 4 legged combines that harvest his grass.
    A grass farmer is not really a grass farmer. He is a sunshine harvester and blades of grass just happen to be his solar collectors.
    A bee keeper is not a bee keeper, he is a honey producer or a pollen spreader or a wax producer. The bees are just his 4 winged flying honey collectors/pollinators/wax producers.

    Know thy true business!

    DarJones
    NW Alabama, 50 years, 20 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  5. #64
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    To me failure is a personal definition. It all depends on what your goals are. If you never reach them that could be failure, perhaps because of mismanagement, lack of knowledge or experience, a faulty plan, circumstances out of our control, or perhaps unrealistic goals. My goals are very different from someone who wants to make money in beekeeping.
    "...fascists divide themselves into two categories: fascists and antifascists" Ennio Flaiano

  6. #65
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Failure is both objective and subjective. Someone may look at another person a consider them a failure from their perspective. Someone may look at themselves and consider themselves a failure. If you never tried, and wanted to but didn't, maybe that is a character failure. Or maybe you didn't get around to it.

    Maybe we should be considering what it means to succeed. To me succeeding is trying and doing and continuing to learn and do. Getting better would be nice too. But, as long as the individual is satisfied, no one elses opinion matters. 'cept maybe the loan officer.
    Mark Berninghausen

  7. #66
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    But, as long as the individual is satisfied, no one elses opinion matters.
    BINGO!! If I dont have a business plan and yet I am running 20+ hives and I am happy with how things are going...........then whos business is it to tell me I should do things different??

    Now, if I am complaining that the bees are driving me into the poor house, and I didnt have a business plan to make money in the many ways that bee's can provide..............thats my fault and fire away!!

    I was in the bee yard this morning checking the hives to see how things are going and checking reserves (its all good!) and got to sit in the middle of 3 hives orientating/cleansing without a veil on.............now that there is why I love beekeeping!!
    Coyote Creek Bees

  8. #67
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    I was in the bee yard today too. Weren't any bees there tho. They are all in SC. I successfully moved a barrel of Orangeblossom honey from one bay of the building to another. I moved a pallet of deeps outdoors for the winter. I moved honey to the house for packing and shuffled some stuff around so I can fill nuc boxes w/ comb for Spring nucs. So, I wasn't a failure today. I succeeded in getting some things done. Let's see what tomorrow brings.
    Mark Berninghausen

  9. #68
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeGhost View Post
    If I dont have a business plan and yet I am running 20+ hives and I am happy with how things are going...........then whos business is it to tell me I should do things different??
    IRS if you claim it is a business with deductions.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  10. #69
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    talking rock georgia
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    I have read alot on here about buisiness plans and my plan is not wrote down it mainly cause a bee can't read anyway. I do what I need to do to make things happen and be preapared in advance. I have had to make more decisions as things get bigger and try to figure out which way to go to make money in the bees. At this time I am just shooting from the hip and as I learn more from others and see where my nitch will be I will foucus more in that area. But as far as a writen business plan I dont have one. As for making money and making a living I dont see it as brain surgery just a bee business with bee related things to sale. What do people want? I have had no trouble saleing anything yet(honey,wax candles,wood ware, bees,ect) only problem I have had is not enogh of it. I know how to fix that!! So my attitude is lets just see where it goes before I quit my day job.

  11. #70
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    IRS if you claim it is a business with deductions.
    Not claiming anything in my apiary...............everything is out of pocket and in the red............wait............what color comes after red!!LOL

    Like I said, if I was to pursue a sideliner business, then I would come up with a plan. For now, its a hobby with no money changing hands, except my money going to Mannlake!!

    Im quite sure that the IRS is not going to waste their time pursuing an income that nets under $1000 a year. Besides, isnt their a dollar amount before you have to start claiming income?? Im not a business man or know anything about the IRS, so its a legitimate question.................that is WAY off topic from the original thread.
    Coyote Creek Bees

  12. #71
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Fusion:

    My dad and all the old time ranchers told me "We're in the grass business, and the cow is the vehicle of return." I keep 28 to 40 Black Angus mothers, and it is a hobby. I use them for ag exempt purposes, but there is precious little profit in cattle. Year in and year out, if you make 100 bucks per mother cow, it is acceptable, if you make 200 bucks per mom it is exceptional. I love the land, and keeping cattle allows me to treat the land in a more natural manner.

    My bees are in the same vein, except I don't claim them on my taxes. I just love to watch them. Sometimes when returning from one of the pastures, I just pull up beside the hives and watch them.

  13. #72
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    BeeGhost - there is no dollar amount below which you don't have to report to the IRS. What I do is list my bee related income as misc income and as I am already itemizing deductions, deduct the same amount as expenses on Schedule A - the result is no tax due on my rather limited bee income. There is a threshold to meet and itemizing deductions may not be beneficial for everyone so do your own research or talk with a tax person. (The big advantage to doing it this way instead of reporting the income and Expenses on Schedule C is the avoidance of self-employment taxes. My operation is very clearly a hobby.

  14. #73
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    Sqeak:

    Most texts would disagree with you:
    I'm late to the party.

    https://www.beesource.com/resources/u...-bee-colonies/

    "Honey bees, Apis mellifera L., are kept by man in bee hives, but bees are not domestic animals in any sense of the word. Man adapted his handling and management of these insects by fitting his methods to meet their natural behavior. Bees are no different in their needs or behavior today than were the wild honey bees in the forests at the time of the cave man. When bees swarm from modern hives, they readily return to their wild condition. They have been on earth since the Jurassic period, 160 million years ago, and have survived without manís help."
    Regards, Barry

  15. #74
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Barry,
    Did you also Post this on the Thread containing the Poll:Are European Honeybees Domestic? Thanks if you did.
    Mark Berninghausen

  16. #75
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Regardless of what anyone will call them. Bees are not domesticated. You dog is domesticated, your cat is not. Think about the differences. If you took both and dumped them by the side of the road. The dog would starve the cat would not. The cat is the only undomesticated (Wild) animal that will choose to live with humans. They cannot be domesticated. Neither can the bee.

  17. #76
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    It is not that cats are not domesticated, rather that cats have domesticated humans. After all, the cat puts up with humans, is fed by humans, given a warm place to sleep by humans. Humans are definitely domesticated.... by cats.

    DarJones
    NW Alabama, 50 years, 20 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  18. #77
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    There are wild dogs (feral dogs), cats, horses, pigs, goats and bees all over this continent. People keep, hybrid, import as we see fit. Some we manage for food, some for pets and some for both.

    Any argument that can be said about bees can also be said about cats, dogs, horses, chickens and cows...

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...wild_bees.html
    National Geographic refers to them as " domesticated honeybee"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_bee
    "Apis mellifera, the most commonly domesticated species"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beekeeping
    Domestication of wild bees in 2422BCE


    Webster's
    Domesticate: to adapt (an animal or plant) to life in intimate association with and to the advantage of humans

    That would include cats, dogs, horses, chickens , cows, and bees.
    Last edited by FlowerPlanter; 12-29-2011 at 01:55 PM.

  19. #78
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    And all the different lice we carry around on our bodies? Or are we domesticated by them?
    Mark Berninghausen

  20. #79
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    You have lice

    I don't have any lice

  21. #80
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    Default Re: Why some beekeepers fail

    Maybe it's mites. I get them mixed up. heh,heh
    Mark Berninghausen

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