hive beetles
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Thread: hive beetles

  1. #1
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    Default hive beetles

    does anyone know if this will kill bees http://www.bugspray.com/catalog/products/page2209.html i have beetles and dont know what to do to get rid of them

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    Effect on beneficial arthropods. Synthetic pyrethroids are broad spectrum insecticides and are notorious for killing and repelling beneficial arthropods. However, since pyrethrum residues on the plant break down quickly, the effect on natural enemies is reduced. Pyrethrum is highly toxic to bees. The average lethal dose (LD50) for honeybees was measured at .022 micrograms per bee (Casida and Quistad 1995). Direct hits on honeybees and beneficial wasps are likely to be lethal (Cox 2002).

    The above can be found at:

    http://web.pppmb.cals.cornell.edu/re...0pyrethrum.php

  4. #3
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    ok thank you im glad i didnt use that on my bees do you know any other ways to get rid of shb without using the beetle traps

  5. #4
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    You have no choice but to use some type of trap. The only other sure way to be rid of them is to let them kill off the hive and they'll eventually move out into another hive, maybe someone else's! The type of plan is up to you. They do not go away on their own!

  6. #5
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    The cd jewel case traps work well for me.I always find a few dead in the traps when I do inspections and almost never see a beetle loose in the hive.I use a little bit of bait/poison in the case.The poison I am using now is "Combat"active ingredient Fipronil.I put 5 small dots around the center.Kills em and best of all its cheap.
    You can find plans on this site.They are simple to make.Even I could do it.
    Last edited by gone2seed; 12-03-2011 at 02:41 PM. Reason: edited to add...plans can be found on this site

  7. #6
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    We have lots of "guests" in Florida. Keep the hive in full sun. Keep it crowded so the bees can defend it. Use traps that go between the frames and an oil tray under the screened bottom board. Reduce the entrance year-round. When they overwhelm the hive or have larva in the comb use Checkmite +, Coumaphos. Use Gardstar on the ground around the hive. Some believe putting the hive over landscape fabric or a solid surface helps but they crawl over 150 feet to pupate in the soil. Last but certainly not least, try Buckfast or another bee that chases the suckers out!
    americasbeekeeper.com
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  8. #7
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    "try Buckfast or another bee that chases the suckers out! "

    I have some hives where the bees very actively chase the SHB. I will select hives for splits which have this characteristic and are not glueing up the traps ( I use AJ beetle traps but glueing is an issue with all traps) - as well as being "good" producers,

  9. #8
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    with the between frame traps, run your hive tool down both sides to crush the beetles that are hiding between the frame and trap, then pry the traps up with your hive tool
    Yes, my Belgian Buckfast are better than the old Abbey Buckfast. They have more of an African component that have been exposed to SHB all their life.
    americasbeekeeper.com
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  10. #9
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    from my research i have come to understand that small hive beetles lay their eggs in the soil, the larva then make their way to the hive to live. as such you can limit the beetle numbers, assuming that your hive stand is on four legs and not cinder blocks. you put the legs of your hive stand inside of coffee cans and add a little motor oil to the cans, this also keeps ants out.

    I built my stands from angle iron and mounted it to a single pipe leg that i cemented into the ground, the pipe has a bowl
    shaped piece welded to it that will hold oil.
    i use ratchet straps to prevent wind or animals from knocking my hives over. they are about two feet about the ground so i have limited problems with skunks etc. the bowl of oil stops shb and ants. the only pest problem that my hive stand doesn't help with is mites and wax moths.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    Quote Originally Posted by diablod3 View Post
    from my research i have come to understand that small hive beetles lay their eggs in the soil, the larva then make their way to the hive to live. as such you can limit the beetle numbers, assuming that your hive stand is on four legs and not cinder blocks.<snip rest of message>
    Er, do you per chance work for a government research lab?

    You probably need to go back and review your research. SHB *fly* into the hive, lay their eggs in a recess/crevice/crack/whatever. The eggs hatch and the larvae begins it's sliming of the hive. Once the larvae mature to a certain age they crawl out of the hive, fall to the ground, either burrow into the ground at that spot or crawl (sometimes quiet a distance) to another spot and burrow into the ground. They pupate in the ground and emerge as an adult beetle...once again to take wing and *fly* into the hive. The protected legs of the hive stand will not help against shb. Some of the things that help are in-hive beetle traps, ground treatments, strong colonies, and honey bees that are sensitive/aggressive towards beetles.

    I've been known to be wrong, but I think the above is pretty close to being correct.

    Best wishes,
    Ed

  12. #11
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    lol, no i don't work for the gov. just what i have read before i started beekeeping. granted i only started last year. I have never seen anything about the beetles flying, that's good to know.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    went back and read again, it says that the larva leave the hive when they are ready to pupate which they do in the soil, they then return to the hive to lay eggs,etc. my various sources don't specify that they can fly so i just assumed that they walked, i guess the oil kills the larvae when they try to leave the hive. assuming that they crawl down the legs of the hive and don't simply crawl off the edge of the bottom board.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: hive beetles

    Do some more reading! The larva don't crawl down the legs of the hive. They move out the entrance and fall to the ground, by the thousands. Believe me; I've witnessed this more times than I care to talk about. The bottom board oil traps will kill some but not all of them by any stretch of the imagination. You will only watch one hive with this condition before deciding that the best way is to kill the adults in the hive before they lay enough eggs to destroy the hive. BTW, they can fly up to 5-6 miles per day.

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