Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatments - Page 7
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  1. #121
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    34,541

    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    Ted, was it AFB and Dr. Waltert Rothenbueler? He and his researchers developed a bee that was highly hygenic. So highly so that it wouldn't get AFB. But, it also didn't proiduce much honey.

    I have the 1952 USDA Yearbook of Agriculture "Insects" right here. For some reason my Father had this book on our bookshelf for years. I recall looking at it a number of times and then finally reading it when I went to OSU/ATI.
    Mark Berninghausen

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  3. #122

    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    Personally, I’m not fond of these kinds of quizzes. The only purpose I can see is for the questioner to appear knowledgeable while he/she tells responders they are wrong. If you want to share information…..why not just do it?
    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. - Emerson

  4. #123
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    Posts
    5,083

    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    I'm with Dan on this one, I want to hear the rest of the story.

  5. #124
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    2,998

    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    Who can tell me what the original research that was done many years before mites that guided scientist into the development of Varroa mite resistant bees??? TED
    The work Rothenbuhler did with hygienic behavior did not directly correlate with mite tolerance and at the time it was done was only intended to find out if breeding could solve the major problem with AFB that was a nationwide scourge in the 1920's and 1930's. Unfortunately, they found that inbreeding is the achilles heel of honeybees as the more they inbred for hygienic traits, the more susceptible the bees became to EFB. I would argue an article in the May 1936 Gleanings that described finding two highly AFB tolerant colonies presaged most of the hygienic research and showed that hygienic bees are possible.

    I will still stand by the statement that Brother Adam's account of breeding for tracheal mite tolerance precedes the hygienic research and is more directly correlated with the problems we have now with varroa. We now are reasonably sure that tracheal mite tolerance is a combination of higher pilosity and increased grooming/allogrooming behavior. I suspect that varroa tolerance is going to be linked to shorter brood development time, increased grooming behavior, and hygienic traits for removal of infested brood.

    The problem with highly hygienic bees is that they start uncapping and removing excessive amounts of brood. Eventually they have to be outcrossed or they will remove so much brood that the colony dwindles and dies. Hygienic behavior has a part to play in mite tolerance, but it will be contributory, other traits will have more significant effects.

    I did a little more digging to find some older references. The first mention I could find for grooming/allogrooming behavior in Apis Cerana was by Peng in 1987. This was followed by a description of hygienic cell cleaning of infested worker brood by Rath and Drescher in 1990. This was followed by numerious observations that shorter development times led to varroa reproductive failure.

    Rinderer summed up most of the information available on breeding for varroa tolerance in this article.

    http://www.altigoo.com/IMG/pdf/Rinde...Destructor.pdf

    DarJones
    Last edited by Fusion_power; 12-05-2011 at 05:44 PM.
    NW Alabama, 50 years, 20 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  6. #125
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    dadeville, alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,148

    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    It is not to meant as a quiz, as there a whole bunch of people out there in bee land that know a whole lot more than I. Dr. Rothenbuhler is the correct answer. When the Varroa mite first hit. The Beltsville bee lab in conjunction with Baton Rouge bee lab went back into the Rothenbuhler's old research for answers. Their thinking: if bees can be bred to uncap American Foulbrood and clean it out- a hygienic trait, then why cant we breed bees that can uncap and remove larvae infested with varroa. So the search went world wide to find strains of european bees that had been in contact with Varroa for a very long time. That had very good grooming behavior, That were hygienic. Dar, I am quite sure that if Brother Adam had lived just a little longer, he would have bred a bee that would and could handle varroa with no problem. Brother Adam was working on that towards the very end of his life. If he had succeeded, varroa would be no more than a paragraph in a beebook....Much work has gone into the development of varroa tolerant and resistant bees with success at our beelabs and by private individuals. Much more work needs to be done. I believe that the next generation of beekeepers will consider Varroa more of an occasional nuisance that needs an occasional spot treatment. While beekeeping will not be totally treatment free, honeybees will not need the blanket treatments of the past to survive. While it has not been smooth sailing, I do see distant shores on the horizon, a brighter future and a better tommorrow for beekeeping. Let us just hope that some unknown, unforeseen pestilence does not await us. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  7. #126
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    211

    Default Re: Commercial beekeeping and the historical decreasing use of harsh to soft treatmen

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Kretschmann View Post
    Let us just hope that some unknown, unforeseen pestilence does not await us. TED
    History has shown that is pretty much a guarantee.

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