Bricks "language" for hive inspection
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northampton, MA
    Posts
    198

    Default Bricks "language" for hive inspection

    We had heard that some people use bricks as markers on hives, and that when the bricks are left in specific positions that it serves as an indication of the state of the hive the last time it was inspected. Can someone provide me with the key to this language?

    Thanks

    Adam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    York, PA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Bricks "language" for hive inspection

    I would also be interested in seeing it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    CAMARILLO, California, USA
    Posts
    3,649

    Default Re: Bricks "language" for hive inspection

    Bricks can be positioned in one of the 4 cornors of the cover or in the center. (5 places.)
    They can be placed down on their wider side or turned over on their narrow side.
    They can be placed up-right in their ends.
    For example, I place the brick up on it's end so that I know that nuc or hive needs a queen cell or mated queen.
    Two small rocks near the ends of the hive cover indicates it's queenless.
    One small rock on a corner means that its queenright.
    Some of us use lumber crayons or permanent markers and yes they do fade after some time.
    I have seen aluminum air conditioning tape applied to the hive and written upon with sharpies.
    And the classic method of hive conditions is using a 1"X4" X 4" board that is painted with color codes.
    The main objective is to have a simple method and not get complicated.
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tulsa OK. USA
    Posts
    833

    Default Re: Bricks "language" for hive inspection

    I don't belive that there is a set language. There is often a brick or large stone placed on a hive cover to prevent it from blowing off, so it is already handy for the beekeeper to use as a indicator of hive status. The placement of the marker may vary from beekeeper to beekeeper.
    Stop and smell the flowers, 50,000 ladies can't be wrong
    [email protected]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Port Orange, Florida, USA
    Posts
    243

    Default Re: Bricks "language" for hive inspection

    I was trying to use bricks to mark what the hives needed but kept forgetting what the posistions were supposed to mean. I have ended up carring a roll of drywall paper tape, some duct tape and a pencil in my bucket. I rip a piece of the drywall tape off the roll, write what it needs on it and stick it on the hive with the tape. All I mark my hives for are how many supers are full or if they need more room, sometimes I'll make a note about the queen or brood in a hive but I only have five hives. I could see using some type of code with bricks if you were running a bunch of hives, if they had different colors painted on each side you could just look down the row after an inspection to figure what is needed for the next visit.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northampton, MA
    Posts
    198

    Default Re: Bricks "language" for hive inspection

    I know that I came across this "language" someplace. It was in one of my books, but cannot recall which one. I suppose I just need to figure out what I want to know and make a list and then make another list of possible brick positions.

    I had wanted to avoid reinventing the wheel if there is already a standard. I want a sustem that shows what needs attention quickly, like from the wheel of the truck instead of having to walk up to a hive and read.

    I guess a brick in vertical position would mean queen less since it's the most pressing issue to be resolved.

    Maybe bricks running parralell to the front edge of the hive could mean trouble of some sort and bricks running parallel to the side meaning all is well.

    I painted three sides of 30 bricks (one wide, one narrow and one end) and will use the broad flat side to stencil a letter number unique ID for each one. That way when we have time to write records we can have a number to connect a hive to.

    If I do develop a useful pattern language I'll post it here in perhaps it can be developed into a standard.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •