MAQS result on hi mite count
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  1. #1
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    Default MAQS result on hi mite count

    Previous thread noted a count of 250 in 24 hrs on one hive and 150 on the second. This from a count about 4 weeks ago on 2nd year hives. After applying maqs last week the count improved to 100 on first and 40 on the other. Looks OK for another treatment in the fall.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    I appreciate your report. I've been waiting to hear results other than the advertising and such.
    Try living life with the attitude it's not about what you want to do but what you should do!

  4. #3
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    i copied this from Randy olivers article.

    Mites started dropping immediately after
    treatment, and by the second day there was
    considerable drop on the sticky boards beneath
    the screened bottoms. I was not interested
    in those counts, however—what I
    wanted to know was what the mite infestation
    of the bees would be after a complete
    brood cycle, so that I could see if any mites
    in the brood survived and emerged. I was
    able to take samples on Day 23, when the
    weather cleared (Fig. 9).

    what you might be seeing are mites that were killed in the brood, a count after 21 days might give a better indication of how low your mite's really are.
    mike syracuse ny
    Whatever you subsidize you get more of. Ronald Reagan

  5. #4
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    Thanks mike
    another count after the next hatch would be a wise move. beginning to learn the possible destruction caused by the varroa mite.

  6. #5
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    Maybe the available treatment is too new but seems like we should be seeing a lot more posts about the product given it is being called a silver bullet at all. I'm still not that ken on using the stuff with honey supers on. Common since tells me that just because something is natural does not make it safe in all amounts and situations. I'm waiting to see that there are no law suits on that one before I'll do it.
    Try living life with the attitude it's not about what you want to do but what you should do!

  7. #6
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    my take would be I don't know if it will kill enough mites to keep your hives alive, but I would be dumbstruck if they didn't test every possible combination of ways a beek can put the pads on a hive includeing between the honey supers, and not have any residual data. At least if I was selling it, thats what I would have done. so I'm not concerned about residual's in honey, I just want to know It will control mites in the fall so I have live hives in the spring.
    mike syracuse ny
    Whatever you subsidize you get more of. Ronald Reagan

  8. #7
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    I agree about the safety of this product. You would have to beleive that ample testing was done before marketing. And testing for honey contamination would not be that difficult.
    Would like to see more beeks comments on their use and results.

  9. #8
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    Exclamation Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    One word of caution on MAQS...do NOT use in low temps in the spring. It was applied to about 300 hives that suffered kill of all the brood in all cycles and the queen stopped laying for a couple of weeks...we thought they had also gone queenless because of this. I figure that because it was cold and there was no heat to disapate the product it concentrated in the hive which killed the brood. I told the beek to notify the manufactures of MAQS about what happened so they could put a warning on their packages, put just a heads up for those here. I would also not apply in late fall if it gets too cold.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  10. #9
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    Oregon City, Oregon
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    I believe the product already comes with a temperature range warning, I know the earlier version of mite-away did....But if people just tear open the container and wing it without reading all the small print......... I think the range is no lower than 50deg. and no higher than 80deg.
    Honeydew

  11. #10
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    It says 50 degrees, and I think it was right around there that they were applied. I personally wouldn't put it on my hives after seeing the kill unless it was at least 65 and sunny. JMHO. He runs 4500 hives so he can take a hit like that...I certainly couldn't.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  12. #11
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    it should also be noted that Randy Olivers test was done with screened bottom boards. from the NOD website.
    4) Subject: Screen Bottom Boards
    Q) Should I leave the Screen Bottom open or close it off?
    A) There was only one trial run so far with screen bottom boards open, by Randy Oliver (www.scientificbeekeeping.com). He published the results in the February 2011 issue of American Bee Journal. There was a 4 to 5 % reduction in efficacy over a solid bottom board, however, both open screen and solid bottom boards saw over 90% drop in mite loads, so it is basically up to the beekeeper.

    and from what I could see on his temp graph from a low of 45 F. to 65 F. for the first three days.

    still trying to see if they are safe to use.
    mike syracuse ny
    Whatever you subsidize you get more of. Ronald Reagan

  13. #12
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    I used the strips on both strong hives with 5 mediums and screened bottoms. Also tilted the top cover to 1/4 inch opening. I looked for bearding or other signs of bee grief but found none. Final results will only be evident in the fall or later. Temps were in the mid to hi sixties with rain and cloudy bout half the weeks treatment.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: MAQS result on hi mite count

    This is from this months WASBA newsletter.

    MAQS has been in the marketplace in Hawaii for 18 month, and now parts of the US for 2
    months. There has been a lot of interest and many phone calls. Here is a Top-10 Frequently
    Asked Questions (FAQ) list for MAQS:

    1) Subject: The paper wrap on the gel strip.
    Q) I remove the outer plastic wrap, should I peel the inner paper wrap off of the of the gel?
    A) The paper wrap stays on. It works as a wick to help control the vapour release.

    2) Subject: Examining the colony and then treating.
    Q) The label says to disturb the colony as little as possible at time of application. Can I do a full
    colony exam and then treat immediately, or should I wait and come back and treat?
    A) The bees need to have their affairs in order when treated. When running trials it was found
    out that the colony assessments were best done 3 days in advance of the application. If the
    colonies were taken apart, assessed, reassembled and then treated shortly after we saw some
    absconding. It also increased the risk of queen loss. After an exam it would be best to wait at
    least until the next day to apply MAQS.

    3) Subject: Treating with honey supers on.
    Q) Can I really treat with honey super on? Why does it not flavour the honey?
    A) Formic acid naturally occurs in honey at levels ranging up to over 2,000 parts per million (ppm).
    The formic acid concentration in hive air during MAQS treatment remains well below 100 ppm, so the levels in the honey do not go outside of naturally occurring levels.

    4) Subject: Screen Bottom Boards
    Q) Should I leave the Screen Bottom open or close it off?
    A) There was only one trial run so far with screen bottom boards open, by Randy Oliver
    (www.scientificbeekeeping.com). He published the results in the February 2011 issue of American Bee Journal.
    There was a 4 to 5 % reduction in efficacy over a solid bottom board, however, both open screen and solid bottom boards saw over 90% drop in mite loads, so it is basically up to the beekeeper.

    5) Subject: Additional entrances, cracks in the equipment.
    Q) Should I close off all entrances except the fully open bottom board entrance?
    A) The fully open bottom entrance should be seen as meeting the minimum ventilation need. Having additional entrances does not seem to affect the efficacy of the treatment. Adequate ventilation is critical with this product. For 2 brood chamber colonies some beekeepers slide back the second story to create a temporary full width entrance, and then slide the boxes back square sometime after the first 3 days.

    6) Subject: Colony response - bees bearding on the hive.
    Q) It looks like most of the bees in the hive are bearding out on hive. Is this normal?
    A) It is normal for the bees to beard out for the first day, especially under warmer conditions. See the University of Hawaii photos in their report from 2009, found at: http://www.miteaway.com/V1-wright-varroa.pdf . There may be an increase in adult bee mortality in the first three days after application. Remember natural loss of bees occurs at about the same rate as egg-laying; with the formic treatment the bees may not be able to clean away the bees as quickly as usual.

    7) Subject: Field bee activity.
    Q) Will the bees continue to forage during the treatment?
    A) Yes, the bees continue to forage.

    8) Subject: Impact on brood - reducing dose?
    Q) What is impact on the brood? Can I reduce the dose?
    A) Studies have shown that reducing the dose reduces the effectiveness, and may still cause some brood damage.
    What we know from trials conducted so far is that MAQS works best by the 2-strip dose. Any brood damage that occurs is quickly made up, the queen is laying throughout the cluster area by Day +7. There are often lots of eggs by Day+4 although they may be as far away from the strips as possible. Any damage is cleaned up by Day +7. The field bees can continue to get pollen through the whole treatment, so there are good protein reserves when all the larva need feeding. The next time that MAQS is used, even if it is months later, the bees somehow know how to cope better.

    9) Subject: Moving bee hives during treatment.
    Q) Can I move the bees during the 7-day treatment period?
    A) The bees should not be disturbed during the treatment period.

    10) Subject: Removing the strip residue after treatment.
    Q) The bees chewed up some of the strip but did not remove it all. How do I dispose of the residue?
    A) The residue from MAQS will simply compost over time. It can be handled the same way as any other organic yard-waste material.

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